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Speaker of the House John Boehner listens as U.S. President Barack Obama talks as he hosts a luncheon for bi-partisan Congressional leaders in the Old Family Dining Room at the White House in Washington, Nov. 7.

LARRY DOWNING/Reuters

A White House lunch aiming for co-operation boiled into a fresh dispute with newly empowered Republicans over immigration reform Friday, with GOP leaders warning President Barack Obama to his face not to take unilateral action. The president stood unflinchingly by his plan to act.

Republicans attending the post-election lunch at Obama's invitation said they asked him for more time to work on legislation, but the president said his patience was running out. He reiterated his intent to act on his own by the end of the year if they don't approve legislation to ease deportations before then and send it to him to sign.

The Republicans' approach, three days after they resoundingly won control of the Senate in midterm elections, "seemed to fall on deaf ears," Sen. John Cornyn of Texas said in a telephone interview. "The president instead of being contrite or saying in effect to America, 'I hear you,' as a result of the referendum on his policies that drove this last election, he seems unmoved and even defiant."

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"I don't know why he would want to sabotage his last two years as president by doing something this provocative," said Cornyn.

The White House said that Obama laid out three areas where he and Congress could work together before the end of the year — emergency funding to combat the Ebola outbreak, approval of a federal budget and quick action on spending to fight the Islamic State militant group. And the White House said, "The president reiterated his commitment to taking action on immigration reform in light of the House's inability to pass a comprehensive bill."

The meeting was tense at times, according to a senior House Republican aide. The aide was not authorized to describe the back-and-forth publicly by name and spoke only on condition of anonymity.

Senate Democratic leader Harry Reid, about to lose his grip on the upper chamber, barely said a word. The aide said at one point as House Speaker John Boehner was making an argument on immigration, Obama responded that his patience was running out and Vice-President Joe Biden interrupted to ask how long Republicans needed. Obama angrily cut Biden off, the aide said.

In public, Obama's tone had been more upbeat as he opened the gathering. He pledged to work on ending long-running partisan gridlock and to be open to Republican ideas. The president said the lunch was a chance to "explore where we can make progress" after Americans showed in the midterm elections that they wanted to see more accomplished in Washington.

"They'd like to see more co-operation," Obama said, sitting at the middle of 13 lawmakers in the Old Family Dining Room set with the Truman china. "And I think all of us have the responsibility, me in particular, to try to make that happen."

Reporters were ushered out before any lawmaker spoke or lunch was served. Republican descriptions of the meeting were provided after it ended, with aides speaking only on condition of anonymity.

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For the record, Boehner's office said he suggested that the president should back a Republican jobs bill as a starting place for bipartisan action.

Obama said at the start he was interested in "hearing and sharing ideas" for compromise on measures to boost the economy, then mentioned his personal priorities of college affordability and investment in road and building projects. He also touted improved monthly job growth numbers out Friday as evidence his economic policies are working, saying, "We're doing something right here."

Briefings on Ebola and the Islamic State from Pentagon officials dominated much of the meeting, and the immigration debate was said to have lasted about half an hour. Sen. John Barrasso, R-Wyo., said Republicans told Obama that any executive order, particularly on immigration but any issue, would be a "toxic decision."

"He still hasn't come to grips with the reality of the election and the consequences of the election," Barrasso said. "His tone and tenor didn't seem to reflect that of somebody whose policies were just significantly rejected all across the country just three days ago."

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