Skip to main content
The Globe and Mail
Support Quality Journalism.
The Globe and Mail
First Access to Latest
Investment News
Collection of curated
e-books and guides
Inform your decisions via
Globe Investor Tools
Just$1.99
per week
for first 24 weeks

Enjoy unlimited digital access
Enjoy Unlimited Digital Access
Get full access to globeandmail.com
Just $1.99 per week for the first 24 weeks
Just $1.99 per week for the first 24 weeks
var select={root:".js-sub-pencil",control:".js-sub-pencil-control",open:"o-sub-pencil--open",closed:"o-sub-pencil--closed"},dom={},allowExpand=!0;function pencilInit(o){var e=arguments.length>1&&void 0!==arguments[1]&&arguments[1];select.root=o,dom.root=document.querySelector(select.root),dom.root&&(dom.control=document.querySelector(select.control),dom.control.addEventListener("click",onToggleClicked),setPanelState(e),window.addEventListener("scroll",onWindowScroll),dom.root.removeAttribute("hidden"))}function isPanelOpen(){return dom.root.classList.contains(select.open)}function setPanelState(o){dom.root.classList[o?"add":"remove"](select.open),dom.root.classList[o?"remove":"add"](select.closed),dom.control.setAttribute("aria-expanded",o)}function onToggleClicked(){var l=!isPanelOpen();setPanelState(l)}function onWindowScroll(){window.requestAnimationFrame(function() {var l=isPanelOpen(),n=0===(document.body.scrollTop||document.documentElement.scrollTop);n||l||!allowExpand?n&&l&&(allowExpand=!0,setPanelState(!1)):(allowExpand=!1,setPanelState(!0))});}pencilInit(".js-sub-pencil",!1); // via darwin-bg var slideIndex = 0; carousel(); function carousel() { var i; var x = document.getElementsByClassName("subs_valueprop"); for (i = 0; i < x.length; i++) { x[i].style.display = "none"; } slideIndex++; if (slideIndex> x.length) { slideIndex = 1; } x[slideIndex - 1].style.display = "block"; setTimeout(carousel, 2500); } //

French police released these photos of Hayat Boumeddiene and Amedy Coulibaly, suspected of being involved in the killing of a policewoman in Paris’s Montrouge area.

AFP / Getty Images

What began 48 hours ago with two gunmen murdering journalists at the satirical weekly Charlie Hebdo has now been turned into a major terrorist crisis in France, with two different hostage-taking unfolding in the greater Paris area.

(Follow The Globe's live coverage of the French standoffs)

Following a two-day manhunt, the two suspects in the Charlie Hebdo attack, were holed up with at least one hostage in a print shop in the small town of Dammartin-en-Goële, northeast of the capital.

Story continues below advertisement

At the same time, 40 kilometres to the south, an acquaintance of the brothers took at least five people – some of whom are reported to have been wounded – hostage in a kosher supermarket on the eastern outskirts of Paris.

The second crisis started Thursday morning, when a policewoman, Clarissa Jean-Philippe, was shot dead when she and her patrol partner intervened to the scene of a car crash at an intersection in the southern suburb of Montrouge.

It wasn't immediately if the shooter was about to strike a target in the neighbourhood, but the Yaaguel Yaacov Jewish school is 200 metres north of the shooting scene.

The gunman ran away on foot. He is now believed to be the hostage taker at the kosher grocery.

A police official said that the man declared "You know who I am" after opening fire at the market.

Just like the Charlie Hebdo shooting, the latest incident appeared aimed at creating maximum impact. Police at the scene noted that the gunman targeted the kosher store hours before the Jewish Sabbath when it would be crowded.

The supermarket hostage taker is believed to be a 32-year-old man, Amedy Coulibaly.

Story continues below advertisement

Mr. Coulibaly and a 26-year-old woman believed to be his spouse, Hayat Boumeddiene, have been named in a police bulletin as armed, dangerous suspects wanted in connection with the Montrouge killing.

Mr. Coulibaly is reported to be connected with Said and Cherif Kouachi, the two brothers who are the suspected gunmen in the Charlie Hebdo attack.

The three are connected to a radical group known as the Buttes Chaumont network, named after a Paris area where dozens of people were radicalized a decade ago. Around 2004, several from that group left for Iraq to fight American troops.

Other members of the Buttes Chaumont network made headlines in 2010 when French authorities broke up a plot to free a convicted bomber from jail.

Cherif Kouachi and Mr. Coulibaly were seen together in 2010 while visiting Djamel Beghal, the mastermind of the failed prison-break plot.

French media are reporting that Mr. Coulibaly was just released last year after serving a five-year sentence in the jailbreak conspiracy, while Cherif Kouachi was arrested in the same investigation but freed for lack of evidence.

Story continues below advertisement

The man they were trying to break out was Algerian Islamist Smain Ait Ali Belkacem, who was sentenced to life imprisonment in 2002 for a bombing at the Musée d'Orsay metro station in Paris in October 1995 that left around 30 injured.

With reports from Jill Mahoney and Associated Press

Your Globe

Build your personal news feed

  1. Follow topics and authors relevant to your reading interests.
  2. Check your Following feed daily, and never miss an article. Access your Following feed from your account menu at the top right corner of every page.

Follow the author of this article:

Follow topics related to this article:

View more suggestions in Following Read more about following topics and authors
Report an error Editorial code of conduct
Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

If you do not see your comment posted immediately, it is being reviewed by the moderation team and may appear shortly, generally within an hour.

We aim to have all comments reviewed in a timely manner.

Comments that violate our community guidelines will not be posted.

UPDATED: Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

To view this site properly, enable cookies in your browser. Read our privacy policy to learn more.
How to enable cookies