Skip to main content
The Globe and Mail
Support Quality Journalism.
The Globe and Mail
First Access to Latest
Investment News
Collection of curated
e-books and guides
Inform your decisions via
Globe Investor Tools
Just$1.99
per week
for first 24 weeks

Enjoy unlimited digital access
Cancel Anytime
Enjoy Unlimited Digital Access
Canada’s most-awarded
newsroom for a reason
Stay informed for a
lot less, cancel anytime
“Exemplary reporting on
COVID-19” – Herman L
$1.99
per week
for 24 weeks
Get full access to globeandmail.com
Just $1.99per week for the first 24weeks
Just $1.99per week for the first 24weeks
var select={root:".js-sub-pencil",control:".js-sub-pencil-control",open:"o-sub-pencil--open",closed:"o-sub-pencil--closed"},dom={},allowExpand=!0;function pencilInit(o){var e=arguments.length>1&&void 0!==arguments[1]&&arguments[1];select.root=o,dom.root=document.querySelector(select.root),dom.root&&(dom.control=document.querySelector(select.control),dom.control.addEventListener("click",onToggleClicked),setPanelState(e),window.addEventListener("scroll",onWindowScroll),dom.root.removeAttribute("hidden"))}function isPanelOpen(){return dom.root.classList.contains(select.open)}function setPanelState(o){dom.root.classList[o?"add":"remove"](select.open),dom.root.classList[o?"remove":"add"](select.closed),dom.control.setAttribute("aria-expanded",o)}function onToggleClicked(){var l=!isPanelOpen();setPanelState(l)}function onWindowScroll(){window.requestAnimationFrame(function() {var l=isPanelOpen(),n=0===(document.body.scrollTop||document.documentElement.scrollTop);n||l||!allowExpand?n&&l&&(allowExpand=!0,setPanelState(!1)):(allowExpand=!1,setPanelState(!0))});}pencilInit(".js-sub-pencil",!1); // via darwin-bg var slideIndex = 0; carousel(); function carousel() { var i; var x = document.getElementsByClassName("subs_valueprop"); for (i = 0; i < x.length; i++) { x[i].style.display = "none"; } slideIndex++; if (slideIndex> x.length) { slideIndex = 1; } x[slideIndex - 1].style.display = "block"; setTimeout(carousel, 2500); } //

Sherpas walking all night were able to reach the body of a Canadian woman who died on Mount Everest and carry it most of the way down.

The body of Shriya Shah-Klorfine was brought to Camp 2, which can be reached by helicopter. An attempt Monday was scuppered by weather but there are plans to try again Tuesday.

Expedition manager Ganesh Thakuri, who has been spearheading the recovery, said from Nepal that his team brought her from about 7,800 metres down to 6,500. He called it a "very, very hard job."

Story continues below advertisement

"It's much harder than climbing to do this kind of mission," he said. "I don't want to say climbing Everest is easy. It's very hard. But comparing carrying the body and just climbing Everest, [there's]a big difference."

Ms. Shah-Klorfine's husband, Bruce Klorfine, has arrived in Nepal to receive her remains, which will be cremated there. He could not be reached Monday but others close to the climber were relieved she was coming down.

Bikram Lamba called his friend's retrieval important to bring "closure" to the incident. "She conquered Mount Everest, but Mount Everest is a cruel opponent and it took her," he said.

Ms. Shah-Klorfine struggled but reached the summit of Everest last week. She died on the descent. The rest of the team left her where she collapsed, routine practice at the highest and most dangerous parts of the mountain.

"When she was going my wife knitted her a sweater with a Canadian flag on the front," remembered Mr. Lamba, explaining that he and his wife had a family-like relationship with Ms. Shah-Klorfine, who was orphaned young.

"She was wearing it when she summitted, and when she died ... even now, that sweater is on the body."

The dangers of retrieving dead climbers means that recovery efforts often are not mounted. Scores of bodies have been left to lie on the mountain, a macabre sight that hikers must pass on their way to the peak. But several of those close to Ms. Shah-Klorfine said the retrieval was crucial because of the importance of cremation in the Hindu faith.

Story continues below advertisement

"I'm really happy because I was really worried," said Priya Ahuja, a friend. "If they don't do a cremation the soul won't have peace."

Mr. Thakuri said he was keen to retrieve her to minimize the mess on the mountain, which is notoriously littered with climbers' garbage. He said he funded the first retrieval attempt and shared the cost of the second with Ms. Shah-Klorfine's family, who are said to have insurance.

The recovery came in the nick of time. The ropes and ladders installed every season on the mountain to help people climb will be removed within days. Without them, any recovery effort would have been postponed until the fall.

Retrieving her body came after a series of delays and problems, raising questions about the risks being taken to get her down.

"I know it's risky but we didn't force anybody," Ms. Ahuja said. "We didn't make them. We said only 'if it is possible'."

Sherpas were able to reach the body, which was lying at about 8,300 metres, and brought it down about 500 metres on Saturday. But one Sherpa suffered a long fall and the weather turned against them. They left the body there and went down to Camp 3 to sleep. In the face of continuing bad weather they returned to base camp.

Story continues below advertisement

Mr. Thakuri said the Sherpa had not been injured badly. But he struggled Sunday to arrange a fresh team from among the people at base camp All were exhausted from a season of climbing and it would take too long to get rested people to the site. He managed to assemble the crew and they set out as soon as they could.

"They left in the evening time," he said Monday. "The whole night the team walked to South Col."

Your Globe

Build your personal news feed

  1. Follow topics and authors relevant to your reading interests.
  2. Check your Following feed daily, and never miss an article. Access your Following feed from your account menu at the top right corner of every page.

Follow the author of this article:

View more suggestions in Following Read more about following topics and authors
Report an error Editorial code of conduct
Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

If you do not see your comment posted immediately, it is being reviewed by the moderation team and may appear shortly, generally within an hour.

We aim to have all comments reviewed in a timely manner.

Comments that violate our community guidelines will not be posted.

UPDATED: Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

To view this site properly, enable cookies in your browser. Read our privacy policy to learn more.
How to enable cookies