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The Rio de Janeiro community, once a one-word shorthand for Latin America's worst problems, has stabilized

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Rocinha’s narrow roads becoming congested with bus traffic at rush hour.

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The ‘pacifying police,’ known in Portuguese as the UPP, took over control of Rocinha in 2011. Their presence has been controversial.

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Cristian Gomes de Sousa, 39, works in his parents’ shoe store in Rocinha. He had to move out of the neighbourhood when his rental house washed away in heavy rains.

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Helena and Felix Gomes de Souza outside their shoe store.

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Maria de Barros Araujo 40, was granted an apartment through a public housing lottery.

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Roberto Araujo, 43, owns and runs a hardware store. He has worked in Rocinha for 27 years.

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Foreigners visit Rocinha in a Jeep on a favela tour.

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A boy passes a mural in Rocinha.

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The Zuzu Angel tunnel carries evening commuters past a main entrance to Rocinha.

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