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Flowers are placed in of the Krudttonden cultural centre in Copenhagen on Feb. 16, 2015.

SCANPIX DENMARK/REUTERS

Two Danish sources close to the investigation have confirmed to Associated Press that the slain gunman behind two deadly shooting attacks in Copenhagen last weekend was Omar Abdel Hamid El-Hussein.

The sources spoke on condition of anonymity because Copenhagen police have not named the gunman, who they said was a 22-year-old Dane. Several Danish media have already named him.

The attacks in Copenhagen killed two people and wounded five police officers.

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Two men suspected of helping the gunman were jailed for 10 days Monday as Danes mourned the victims of a shooting spree that authorities said may have been inspired by last month's terror attacks in Paris.

They were accused of helping the gunman evade authorities and get rid of a weapon during the manhunt that ended early Sunday when the attacker was killed in a shootout with police, said Michael Juul Eriksen, the defence attorney for one of the two suspects.

Prosecutors had asked a judge to place them in four weeks of solitary confinement and the relatively short period of detention suggests the case against the men is "thin," added Juul Eriksen's assistant, Anders Rohde.

Rohde was speaking to reporters after a four-hour custody hearing held behind closed doors for the men, who were not named.

Two people were killed in the weekend attacks, including a Danish filmmaker attending a free speech event and a Jewish security guard shot in the head outside a synagogue in Copenhagen. Five police officers were wounded in the attacks. Police said Monday they are in good condition and are expected to be released from hospital this week.

Denmark's red-and-white flag flew at half-staff from official buildings across the capital Monday. Mourners placed flowers and candles at the cultural centre where documentary filmmaker Finn Noergaard, 55, was killed and at the synagogue where Dan Uzan, a 37-year-old security guard, was gunned down.

There was also a smaller mound of flowers on the street at the location where the gunman was slain.

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The prime ministers of Denmark and Sweden were expected to join thousands of people at memorials in Copenhagen on Monday evening.

Denmark has been targeted by a series of foiled terror plots since the 2005 publication of 12 caricatures of the Prophet Muhammad in the newspaper Jyllands-Posten. The cartoons triggered riots in many Muslim countries and militant Islamists called for vengeance.

One of the participants in the free speech event targeted Saturday was Swedish artist Lars Vilks, who caricatured the prophet in 2007. Vilks, who was whisked away by his bodyguards and was unharmed, told Associated Press he thought he was the intended target of that attack.

Other participants said they dropped to the floor, looking for places to hide as the shooting started. The gunman never entered the cultural centre but sprayed it with bullets from outside in a gun battle with police.

World leaders, including British Prime Minister David Cameron, German Chancellor Angela Merkel and UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, condemned the Copenhagen attacks.

French President François Hollande visited the Danish embassy in Paris on Sunday and Paris Mayor Anne Hidalgo was in Copenhagen on Monday in a show of solidarity.

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"The terrorist attacks have the same causes in Paris and Copenhagen," Hidalgo said. "Our cities are symbols of democracy, Paris and Copenhagen. We are here and we are not afraid."

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