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U.S. ELECTION 2016

Trump is president. What happens now? A morning-after guide to the U.S. election

JIM WATSON/AFP/GETTY IMAGES

It was one of the most stunning upsets in U.S. politics: Donald Trump brought the Republicans to victory, defying the polls, defeating Hillary Clinton and shocking the world. Here's a complete primer on how he won, what his rivals are saying, how markets reacted and why American democracy may never be the same


Watch President-elect Trump: ‘I will be president for all Americans’

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Here's what's America looked like the morning after:

  • Celebrating his victory early Wednesday morning, president-elect Donald Trump said he would seek to “bind the wounds” of a divided country and that it was time for the country to come together as “one united people.” Read his full victory speech here.
  • In a concession speech on Wednesday, Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton urged her supporters to make way for an orderly transition of power. “Donald Trump is going to be our President and we owe him an open mind and a chance to lead,” she said.
  • Markets were rocked by the news of Mr. Trump’s victory, though didn’t collapse at the open as initially thought. Here’s a primer on how the market was unfolding on Wednesday.
  • U.S. President Barack Obama congratulated Mr. Trump on Wednesday and invited him to a Thursday meeting at the White House to discuss the transition of power.
  • Congratulations from other foreign leaders began to pour in on Wednesday morning, including Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau. Here’s an overview of how world leaders are taking the news.
  • Reaction in Europe was cautious as Britons saw another Brexit-like stunner in the United States, Paul Waldie reports from London.
  • Mr. Trump won four of the key battleground states: Pennsylvania, Ohio, Florida, and North Carolina. But the real shocker of the night was how he broke the Democrats’ so-called Blue Wall of safe states like Wisconsin.
  • Donald Trump has 290 electoral college votes with wins in: Wisconsin, Pennsylvania, Iowa, Utah, Georgia, Ohio, Idaho, Missouri, Montana, Louisiana, Texas, Arkansas, Wyoming, North Dakota, South Dakota, Kansas, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Kentucky, Indiana, Tennessee and Mississippi.
  • Hillary Clinton has 218 electoral college votes with wins in: Nevada, California, Washington, Oregon, Colorado, Virginia, New Mexico, New York, Connecticut, Vermont, Maryland, Delaware, Massachusetts, New Jersey, Rhode Island, Illinois and the District of Columbia.

GLOBAL REACTION

How the world is getting used to the new Trump reality


A photograph of Mr. Trump is displayed by activists belonging to ‘Hindu Sena,’ or Hindu Army, a local organization in India, in New Delhi on Nov. 9, 2016.

A photograph of Mr. Trump is displayed by activists belonging to ‘Hindu Sena,’ or Hindu Army, a local organization in India, in New Delhi on Nov. 9, 2016.

MANISH SWARUP/ASSOCIATED PRESS

Messages of congratulations – some cautiously worded, others openly enthusiastic – came in to Mr. Trump on Wednesday from leaders around the world. Here’s a primer from Globe foreign correspondents and wire services on who’s saying what.

Here’s the statement Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau issued Wednesday:


On behalf of the Government of Canada, I would like to congratulate Donald J. Trump on his election as the next President of the United States. Canada has no closer friend, partner, and ally than the United States. We look forward to working very closely with President-elect Trump, his administration, and with the United States Congress in the years ahead, including on issues such as trade, investment, and international peace and security. The relationship between our two countries serves as a model for the world. Our shared values, deep cultural ties, and strong integrated economies will continue to provide the basis for advancing our strong and prosperous partnership.”

The election result also got warm praise from Kelly Leitch, one of the candidates for leadership of Canada’s Conservative Party. In a fundraising e-mail to supporters, she suggested Canadians follow Mr. Trump’s lead:


Tonight, our American cousins threw out the elites and elected Donald Trump as their next president. It’s an exciting message and one that we need delivered in Canada as well.




REACTION

How markets are reacting to a Trump presidency


Traders from ETX Capital work in central London react after the U.S. election result on Nov. 9, 2016.

Traders from ETX Capital work in central London react after the U.S. election result on Nov. 9, 2016.

DANIEL LEAL-OLIVAS/AFP/GETTY IMAGES

Stock markets plunged in the immediate aftermath of Mr. Trump’s election victory, but then started to recover Wednesday morning. Here’s how the Canadian dollar and commodity prices responded to the news:






As far as global markets are concerned, a Trump presidency may not be a total economic disaster in the short term, Eric Reguly explains (for subscribers):


Broadly speaking, he wants America to retreat from globalization and somehow revive the U.S. rust belt, which has been a marvel of deindustrialization for close to half a century. He wants to erect a wall along the Mexico-United States border and punish U.S. companies, such as car makers, that shift production to low-wage Mexico. The alphabet soup of transatlantic and transpacific trade deals on the drawing board – TTIP and TPP – seem doomed. In other words, Fortress America is coming. Exporting countries beware. ... On the other hand, president-elect Trump has also vowed to ramp up infrastructure spending, cut corporate and personal taxes and reform the insanely complex U.S. tax code, which encourages rich companies, like Apple, to park hundreds of billions of dollars of cash overseas. Mr. Trump is a businessman.


But as far as Canada is concerned, a Trump victory could be a worst-case scenario: His protectionist rhetoric and pledges to renegotiate global trade deals throws the Canada-U.S. relationship into uncertainty, Barrie McKenna explains (for subscribers):


A Trump presidency is bad news for Canada if he manages to put his protectionist rhetoric into practice, dragging down growth, economists warn. That could undermine Canadian exports and the smooth functioning of the integrated North American economy, particularly in industries such as autos.

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ELECTION NIGHT

How Tuesday night unfolded

by Christina Pellegrini


Guests at Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton's election night rally watch the big screen television at the Jacob Javits Center glass enclosed lobby in New York.

Guests at Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton’s election night rally watch the big screen television at the Jacob Javits Center glass enclosed lobby in New York.

Matt Rourke/AP

A calm and gracious Donald Trump delivered a victory speech at the Hilton Hotel in New York City just before 3 a.m. (ET) on Wednesday. He told his supporters Hillary Clinton had just called to congratulate him. He applauded her: “She fought very hard. Hillary has worked very long and very hard over a long period of time and we owe her a major debt of gratitude for her service to our country. I mean that very sincerely.”


After a lengthy campaign that was bitter and divisive, Mr. Trump said he would seek to “bind the wounds” of a divided country, adding it was time for Americans to come together as “one united people.” He said he would aim to rebuild the country and renew the American dream. “The forgotten men and women of our country will be forgotten no longer,” he added.


The president-elect sought to reassure the international community and calm investors, who sent global markets in a panic as a Trump win became probable: “I want to tell the world community that while we will put American interests first, we will deal fairly with everyone,” Mr. Trump said.


He thanked his family, campaign staff and key surrogates, including: Rudy Giuliani, Governor Chris Christie, Senator Jeff Sessions, Dr. Ben Carson and Republican National Committee chairperson Reince Priebus. Finally, he thanked his running mate, Mike Pence of Indiana.


Ms. Clinton did not give a concession speech.


Around 2 a.m. (ET), her campaign manager, John Podesta, told supporters gathered at the Javits Center in New York to go home, as some votes were still being tallied and “every vote should count,” he said. “She has done an amazing job and she is not done yet.” Ms. Clinton is expected to speak Wednesday morning.


Mr. Trump turned some historically blue states into red ones.


He won battleground states Pennsylvania, Ohio, Florida and North Carolina. The Clinton campaign invested heavily in all those states, with regular visits by Ms. Clinton and President Barack Obama, and get-out-the-vote rallies headed by a full slate of celebrities, including Jay Z and LeBron James. But the real shocker of the night was how he broke the Democrats’ so-called Blue Wall of safe states like Wisconsin.


Ms. Clinton put Virginia, Colorado and Nevada in her column. But the night increasingly went in Mr. Trump’s favour, shocking many pollsters and pundits who incorrectly predicted a landslide Clinton victory.


With a report from Affan Chowdhry


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THE STATES

The key states that swung Trump's way – and why

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by Adrian Morrow, Evan Annett and Associated Press


A supporter holds up a sign as Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump speaks during a campaign rally in Sarasota, Fla., on Nov. 7, 2016.

A supporter holds up a sign as Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump speaks during a campaign rally in Sarasota, Fla., on Nov. 7, 2016.

CARLO ALLEGRI/REUTERS

Both Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump's campaigns brought their heavy firepower in the campaign's final days to traditional battleground states such as Florida, Ohio, North Carolina and Pennsylvania, all of which Mr. Trump won. Hillary Clinton lost nearly every southern state that may have been in play; only in Virginia (with its many Washington, D.C. suburbs) went her way.

But Mr. Trump also made major incursions into the so-called Blue Wall – the base of reliable support that Team Clinton had been counting on to win – coming ahead in Wisconsin and Michigan. With Electoral College votes from Rust Belt states full of white, blue-collar voters, Mr. Trump reached and exceeded the magic number – 270 votes – needed to take the presidency.

Here's a look at some of the hardest-fought state races in the presidential election:


The wave of support from visible minority, urban and millennial voters in the South didn't bring Ms. Clinton the windfall many expected. In an election where Mr. Trump defied virtually every rule of politics and logic, he also put the lie to any notion that changing demographics would inevitably favour the Democrats. Instead, Mr. Trump seems to have put together the Republican base with disenchanted white voters who had either previously supported the Democrats or not voted at all.

In battleground Florida, the election also challenged widely held ideas that Mr. Trump's base was economically marginal white voters, Doug Saunders explains from Sarasota, Fla. Instead, prosperous Americans also did their part to bring Mr. Trump to power:

‘We’re doing pretty well for ourselves, sure, but we’re really mad about what Obama’s doing to this country,’ real estate agent Dave Mattson, 66, said as he and his wife, Wendy, anxiously watched the results at a seaside hotel. He, like almost everyone else here, is white, older, and a more-than-comfortable member of the middle class. And, it turns out, he’s pretty close to being an average Donald Trump voter. It appears that the Trump movement was much more about people like the Mattsons than it was about the poverty-stricken victims of globalization portrayed by the Trump campaign.

Here's some of The Globe's recent on-the-ground reporting from the battleground states Mr. Trump won on Tuesday:

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TROUBLE BREWING

Isolated violence in an otherwise peaceful display of voting across the country


At a Minneapolis rally on Nov. 6, a Trump supporter’s T-shirt joking about killing journalists went viral.

At a Minneapolis rally on Nov. 6, a Trump supporter’s T-shirt joking about killing journalists went viral.

JONATHAN ERNST/REUTERS

Civil-rights groups had been bracing for violence and voter-suppression measures after Donald Trump urged his supporters to monitor polling sites for voter fraud. Mr. Trump's request inspired white nationalist groups, factions of the Ku Klux Klan and militia groups to mobilize their members to monitor the polls. There was one casualty in election-day violence, Rachelle Younglai reports: One person was killed and two were injured when a gunman opened fire in Azusa, a city east of Los Angeles. Civil-rights groups also saw a bigger picture of voter suppression at work:

Before the shooting, civil rights groups reported an increase in vote suppression and intimidation tactics in Texas and New York, as well as in battleground states such as Florida, North Carolina, Ohio and Pennsylvania. ‘It is clear that we are seeing and experiencing the resurgence of voter discrimination and voter suppression in many communities,’ said Kristen Clarke, president of the Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law.

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WHOSE HOUSE?

GOP retains the House and U.S. Senate

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Birds fly over the Lincoln Memorial, the Washington Monument and the U.S. Capitol at sunrise on Election Day in Washington.

Birds fly over the Lincoln Memorial, the Washington Monument and the U.S. Capitol at sunrise on Election Day in Washington.

KEVIN LAMARQUE/REUTERS

The Republicans will retain control of the U.S. House of Representatives – and while the race for the Senate remained too close to call Tuesday night, the Republicans appeared to have stalled Democratic gains in several of the tightest contests, Kelly Cryderman reports:

While Republicans such as Mr. Ryan have had a fractious relationship with Donald Trump, momentum from his presidential campaign and his populist, anti-Washington appeal likely aided at least some Congressional races on Tuesday. For his part, [House Speaker Paul] Ryan he has said he wants to stay on as House Speaker. For this reason alone, he may eventually have to find kind of peace with Mr. Trump.

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REFERENDUMS

Legalized marijuana set to be big winner of U.S. election


Several states have referendums on marijuana laws on election day.

Several states have referendums on marijuana laws on election day.

BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/GETTY IMAGES


Ballot initiatives – state-level referendums that allow residents to vote directly on policy issues – have fallen below the radar during the high-stakes presidential election. But they have historically proven to be important barometers of shifting public sentiment on social issues that have deadlocked Congress and state legislatures. Marijuana was one of the winners of an otherwise bitterly divisive presidential election campaign, as voters in several states voted to support measures that would permit some legal use of the drug, Tamsin McMahon reports:

Voters in three of the most populous states – California, Florida, Nevada and Massachusetts – backed plans to relax marijuana laws. Voters in California, Nevada and Massachusetts supported legalizing marijuana for recreational use, while Floridians supported measures to expand the number of conditions that can be treated with medical marijuana.

OPINION AND ANALYSIS

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