Skip to main content
The Globe and Mail
Support Quality Journalism.
The Globe and Mail
First Access to Latest
Investment News
Collection of curated
e-books and guides
Inform your decisions via
Globe Investor Tools
Just$1.99
per week
for first 24 weeks

Enjoy unlimited digital access
Enjoy Unlimited Digital Access
Get full access to globeandmail.com
Just $1.99per week for the first 24weeks
Just $1.99per week for the first 24weeks
var select={root:".js-sub-pencil",control:".js-sub-pencil-control",open:"o-sub-pencil--open",closed:"o-sub-pencil--closed"},dom={},allowExpand=!0;function pencilInit(o){var e=arguments.length>1&&void 0!==arguments[1]&&arguments[1];select.root=o,dom.root=document.querySelector(select.root),dom.root&&(dom.control=document.querySelector(select.control),dom.control.addEventListener("click",onToggleClicked),setPanelState(e),window.addEventListener("scroll",onWindowScroll),dom.root.removeAttribute("hidden"))}function isPanelOpen(){return dom.root.classList.contains(select.open)}function setPanelState(o){dom.root.classList[o?"add":"remove"](select.open),dom.root.classList[o?"remove":"add"](select.closed),dom.control.setAttribute("aria-expanded",o)}function onToggleClicked(){var l=!isPanelOpen();setPanelState(l)}function onWindowScroll(){window.requestAnimationFrame(function() {var l=isPanelOpen(),n=0===(document.body.scrollTop||document.documentElement.scrollTop);n||l||!allowExpand?n&&l&&(allowExpand=!0,setPanelState(!1)):(allowExpand=!1,setPanelState(!0))});}pencilInit(".js-sub-pencil",!1); // via darwin-bg var slideIndex = 0; carousel(); function carousel() { var i; var x = document.getElementsByClassName("subs_valueprop"); for (i = 0; i < x.length; i++) { x[i].style.display = "none"; } slideIndex++; if (slideIndex> x.length) { slideIndex = 1; } x[slideIndex - 1].style.display = "block"; setTimeout(carousel, 2500); } //

Steven Pieczynski is seen in this police handout photo.

A U.S. man known as the Facebook Burglar, who allegedly illegally entered Canada by kayak last year, was caught after his wife used the social networking website to track him to Toronto, she told a U.S. blog.

Steven Pieczynski, 38, allegedly used acquaintances' Facebook status updates to determine that the occupants of a house were on holiday before he burglarized it.

He allegedly fled charges in New Jersey by sneaking into Canada by kayak last fall and was arrested in east-end Toronto one year ago.

Story continues below advertisement

Now, Mr. Pieczynski's ex-wife is speaking out about how she used Facebook to give him a dose of his own medicine.

After her husband disappeared, Kellie Fry said police told her they had traced his cellphone to a tower in Toronto. She began combing through their home computer and discovered he had created a new Facebook account that had just one friend – a Toronto woman. She used the website to gather information about the woman and forwarded it to police.

"Within two days, I received a phone call from Border Control: We arrested Steve!" she told SimpliSafe, a U.S. home security company which features security-related stories on its blog.

The moral of the story, Ms. Fry says, is: "Be careful what you put on Facebook."

After spending months in custody in Canada, Mr. Pieczynski was deported to the U.S. on Sept. 28 on three burglary-related charges, said Ed Davis, chief warrant officer for the Sheriff's Office in Hunterdon County, N.J. He is currently in jail awaiting trial.

"This is winding through the system," he said.

Mr. Pieczynski faces the charges in relation to a burglary in which jewellery was stolen on Aug. 31, 2012, in West Amwell township in New Jersey.

Story continues below advertisement

"What he did was he broke into a place and then he took off and then he kayaked into Canada," Mr. Davis said.

Mr. Pieczynski's Facebook notoriety started when a family from Wrightstown Township, north of Philadelphia, were away on a trip in September, 2011.

According to U.S. media accounts, someone broke into the home and absconded with jewels, gift cards, coins and DVDs. Neighbours reported seeing a suspicious Toyota with New Jersey plates near the house. This led police to Mr. Pieczynski, who lived a 20-minute drive away in New Jersey.

Investigators later found that Mr. Pieczynski was a Facebook friend of the victims and saw on his own account pictures of his car, which matched the description of the Toyota.

Police say that Mr. Pieczynski used the social-networking site to plan his burglaries. A search of his house led to further charges that he burglarized the homes of two neighbours while power was out during Hurricane Irene's passage in August, 2011.

Your Globe

Build your personal news feed

  1. Follow topics and authors relevant to your reading interests.
  2. Check your Following feed daily, and never miss an article. Access your Following feed from your account menu at the top right corner of every page.

Follow the author of this article:

Follow topics related to this article:

View more suggestions in Following Read more about following topics and authors
Report an error Editorial code of conduct
Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

If you do not see your comment posted immediately, it is being reviewed by the moderation team and may appear shortly, generally within an hour.

We aim to have all comments reviewed in a timely manner.

Comments that violate our community guidelines will not be posted.

UPDATED: Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

To view this site properly, enable cookies in your browser. Read our privacy policy to learn more.
How to enable cookies