Top Business Headlines
 

March 30, 2020

 
 
Top news
 
Canadian companies retool to meet demands on front lines of pandemic
Canadian companies retool to meet demands on front lines of pandemic
 

Tu Thanh Ha

North of Toronto, a car-parts manufacturer is retooling its assembly line to enable it to mass produce the components for medical face shields. In Montreal, a maker of surgical garments is rushing to import fabric and gowns by air rather than sea. In their different ways, both companies illustrate the industrial transformation caused by the outbreak of COVID-19 and the resulting shortage of medical equipment.

 
In the short term, hospitals are turning to their communities to donate unused respirators and protective gear – or even sew homemade masks for visitors so hospitals can ration professional masks for medical personnel. But to truly meet the mounting demands for supplies, Canada’s medical system requires companies to pivot into new areas of production while learning to comply with medical safety standards.

 
 
Full Story
 
 
 
More stories below advertisement
 
 
 
Editor's picks
 
Airlines seek subsidies, loans and tax relief from Ottawa
  Airlines seek subsidies, loans and tax relief from Ottawa
 

Nicolas Van Praet and Eric Atkins

 
Full Story
 
For graduating students, high anxiety as COVID-19 decimates job market
For graduating students, high anxiety as COVID-19 decimates job market
 

Matt Lundy

 
Economics Reporter
 
Full Story
 
Quality stocks to target, safety plays amid dividend cuts and is it time to buy? What you need to know in investing this week
  Quality stocks to target, safety plays amid dividend cuts and is it time to buy? What you need to know in investing this week
 

S.R. Slobodian

 
Full Story
 
 
Latest posted news
 
Detroit auto show cancelled, centre to be used as hospital
 
Full Story
 
Big Oil’s interest in renewable energy investments expected to waver, report says
 
Full Story
 
  Billionaire brothers feud over proposed sale of London’s Ritz hotel
 
Full Story
 
 
Opinion
 
  The coronavirus pandemic is the management crisis of our lifetime
 

Harvey Schachter

Managers have certain moments when their skills are tested to the ultimate – the busy season, or during a takeover bid, or when a new challenger with a superior offering enters the marketplace. But in the past few weeks – and the weeks, if not months, to come – all managers, in every field, at all levels, are being tested, simultaneously, as their operations must adjust, usually quite radically, to the pandemic threat. Our whole world is being turned upside down.

 
We have heard much in recent years about the need for disruption and change. Now we have it – but managers are not in control, they’re trying to make the best of a bad situation. And even when the situation offers opportunities, such as for manufacturers of disinfectant, it requires all their skills to respond.

 
This is the management challenge – the management crisis – of our lifetime. Some organizations are facing tougher decisions than companies have tackled since the Second World War or even the Great Depression.

 
At work, most of us try to find an acceptable balance between some conflicting tensions. We want to do well personally. We want the organization to do well. We want to help others – our colleagues, and the clients we serve. And we want to be good for the community and world – be socially responsible, as much as possible. That balance is being challenged in various ways by COVID-19. Donna Gillespie, head of the economic development commission in Kingston, Ont., where I live, tells of the small-business owner who moaned: “I’m conflicted between moral responsibility and going bankrupt.”

 
 
Full Story
 
 
Energy and resources
 
  Russia calls for new deal with OPEC to tackle collapse of oil markets
 
Full Story
 
 
financial services
 
  OSFI brings in additional measures to assure liquidity in banking system
 
Full Story
 
 
Inside the Market
 
  Cash is the best asset class during this coronavirus crisis
 
Full Story
 
 
Economy
 
IMF says global economy already in recession
 
Full Story
 
 
Technology, telecom and media
 
Telecom entrepreneur JR Shaw built a family empire
 
Full Story
 
 
International business
 
South Africa sees IMF loan to fight coronavirus as last resort
 
Full Story
 
 
Small business
 
  Report on Small Business Newsletter: Small businesses shuttered by COVID-19 push for eviction protection
 
Full Story
 
 
Careers
 
I’m pregnant and afraid of the coronavirus. What are my options?
 
Full Story
 
 
In case you missed it
 
Visa, Mastercard’s plan to freeze swipe fees may deal another blow to Canadian merchants
Visa, Mastercard’s plan to freeze swipe fees may deal another blow to Canadian merchants
 

Rita Trichur and Susan Krashinsky Robertson

 
Full Story
 
 
Politics Briefing Newsletter
 
Stay informed about Canadian politics with Chris Hannay's Politics Briefing newsletter. For subscribers.
 
View More
 
 
About this newsletter
The Top Business Headlines Morning Edition newsletter helps you keep up with the morning's business stories. It is sent Monday to Saturday.

To unsubscribe, use the link at the bottom of every email communication. Or log in to manage your Communication Settings.

Can't log in yet? Registration is free and allows you to read more for free. Tips to stay logged in.

For feedback email Mike Snider.