Top Business Headlines
 

January 27, 2022

 
 
Top news
 
Dye & Durham accused in class-action lawsuit of misleading customers on price freeze
 

Justin Tang/The Canadian Press

  Dye & Durham accused in class-action lawsuit of misleading customers on price freeze
 

Jaren Kerr

 
Mergers and Acquisitions Reporter
A Toronto litigation firm has launched a $200-million class-action lawsuit against Dye & Durham Ltd. DND-T for allegedly violating federal competition laws by misleading customers about a price freeze the company promised last year.
 
The lawsuit, filed by Charney Lawyers, argues that D&D, a legal-technology provider, “reneged” on a promise by increasing the transaction fee on its Unity conveyancing software a year after telling clients that the price would not increase for three years.
 
The action, which seeks $200-million in damages, was filed on behalf of all Unity customers who used the software at the time of the first price hike in January, 2021, and continued to use it afterward.
 
 
Full Story
 
 
 
More stories below advertisement
 
 
 
Editor's picks
 
The Bank of Canada is set to raise interest rates in March. Here’s what it means for your finances and the economy
 

Ashley Fraser/The Globe and Mail

  The Bank of Canada is set to raise interest rates in March. Here’s what it means for your finances and the economy
 

Matt Lundy

 
Economics Reporter
 
Full Story
 
Canada has the natural gas, but can’t get LNG to Europe
 

Handout

  Canada has the natural gas, but can’t get LNG to Europe
 

Brent Jang

 
Full Story
 
Picasso heirs to sell more than 1,000 NFTs linked to never-before-seen ceramic work
 

Boris Heger/The Associated Press

  Picasso heirs to sell more than 1,000 NFTs linked to never-before-seen ceramic work
 

Jamey Keaten

 
Full Story
 
 
Latest posted news
 
  Mastercard’s quarterly profit tops expectations as cross-border spending rises
 
Full Story
 
WhatsApp has until end of February to clarify changes to its privacy policy, EU says
 
Full Story
 
  U.S. economy grew at fastest pace in nearly 40 years in 2021, bouncing back from 2020 recession
 
Full Story
 
 
Opinion
 
  Don’t misread the Bank of Canada’s decision as inaction. Interest rates will rise, and quickly
 

David Parkinson

If the degree to which the Bank of Canada has rolled up its sleeves is indicative of how intensely it’s about to get to work on quelling the inflation problem, then brace yourselves. Those sleeves are balled right up to the shoulder after Wednesday’s interest rate decision.
 
Don’t misread the bank’s decision to not actually start that process for a few more weeks. Everything else about Wednesday’s announcement, and accompanying quarterly Monetary Policy Report (MPR), screamed the case to raise rates. Probably more quickly than many pundits were thinking.
 
“The Bank [of Canada] did a very good job at producing a ‘hawkish hold’ today,” CIBC Capital Markets strategist Ian Pollick said in an e-mail on Wednesday.
 
 
Full Story
 
 
Energy and resources
 
  Oil at seven-year high as Ukraine crisis overshadows Federal Reserve
 
Full Story
 
 
financial services
 
It’s hard to tell when the crypto bubble will burst, or if there is one
 
Full Story
 
 
Inside the Market
 
  Utilities stocks to underperform as bond yields rise: Credit Suisse
 
Full Story
 
 
Economy
 
  Mortgage rundown: Variable-rate borrowers get a short reprieve
 
Full Story
 
 
Technology, telecom and media
 
  Zymeworks stock slumps after struggling Canadian biotech sells US$100-million in highly dilutive share offering
 
Full Story
 
 
International business
 
  Top investment banks scramble to change their Federal Reserve rate calls after hawkish shift
 
Full Story
 
 
Small business
 
  Canadian yacht and private jet makers brace for cancelled orders under Liberal luxury tax
 
Full Story
 
 
Careers
 
  How understanding stages helps you make sense of where you are in your career
 
Full Story
 
 
In case you missed it
 
How Canada’s fragile food supply chain is being disrupted
 

Christopher Katsarov/The Globe and Mail

  How Canada’s fragile food supply chain is being disrupted
 

Ann Hui, Susan Krashinsky Robertson and Eric Atkins

 
National Food Reporter
 
Full Story
 
 
Introducing Women and Work
 
The weekly Women and Work newsletter shines a spotlight on the perspectives of women in workplaces across Canada. Sign up today!
 
View More
 
 
About this newsletter
The Top Business Headlines Morning Edition newsletter helps you keep up with the morning's business stories. It is sent Monday to Saturday.

To unsubscribe, use the link at the bottom of every email communication. Or log in to manage your Communication Settings.

Can't log in yet? Registration is free and allows you to read more for free. Tips to stay logged in.

For delivery issues related to this newsletter, please contact Digital Support.