Top Business Headlines
 

August 2, 2021

 
 
Top news
 
Mining industry’s ‘green metals’ are a fallacy, experts say
 

CAROLINE THIRION/Getty Images

  Mining industry’s ‘green metals’ are a fallacy, experts say
 

Niall McGee

 
Mining reporter
The mining industry is promoting a growing number of metals as green. The label is popping up everywhere: on the landing pages of company websites, in speeches from mining executives at conferences, and in pitch meetings with investors.
 
“Every nickel project is now green, every copper project is green,” said Doug Pollitt, analyst with Pollitt & Co. “The resource sector is making the most out of this.”
 
 
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Editor's picks
 
Canadian companies emerge from COVID-19 pandemic with new diversity and inclusion plans
 

Fred Lum/The Globe and Mail

  Canadian companies emerge from COVID-19 pandemic with new diversity and inclusion plans
 

Takara Small

 
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Sun Life CEO Dean Connor looks back on a decade at the helm
 

Tannis Toohey for Globe & Mail/The Globe and Mail

  Sun Life CEO Dean Connor looks back on a decade at the helm
 

Clare O’Hara

 
Wealth Management Reporter
 
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Toronto’s Playmaker Capital bets it can win big by driving sports fans to gambling websites
 

Jessica Lee/The Globe and Mail

  Toronto’s Playmaker Capital bets it can win big by driving sports fans to gambling websites
 

Simon Houpt

 
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Latest posted news
 
  Companies rethink office design and purpose as return to in-person work draws nearer
 
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China quietly sets new ‘buy Chinese’ targets for state companies, U.S. sources say
 
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  Oil falls on concerns over demand and OPEC supply boost
 
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Opinion
 
Rising from the ashes of a corporate culture apocalypse
 

Adam Froman

Adam Froman, founder and chief executive officer of Delvinia, a research technology company
 
It’s no surprise that most chief executive officers are working with their management teams to determine what their companies will look like as the pandemic eases. How they will address the change in employee attitude regarding returning to their physical offices, and how will they attract and retain talent.
 
While many businesses try to figure out how to recover from the economic impact of COVID-19, the technology sector has seen significant growth accelerated by the increased adoption of technology and digital transformation in business. For tech CEOs, this has been a long 16 months, and many have had to manage their own emotional challenges leading their companies through unprecedented growth and the health crisis.
 
While employees are struggling with mental health challenges because of the pandemic, more than three-quarters of private and public sector leaders are reporting exhaustion, and about 80 per cent say they are working more hours than normal. The emotional struggle has taken its toll on all levels of organizations and has led to one of the untold consequences of the pandemic – the destruction of the corporate culture that CEOs rely on to attract and retain talent and define their organization’s purpose.
 
 
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Energy and resources
 
  Enbridge says Line 3 pipeline replacement to be in service by end of year, despite legal challenges
 
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financial services
 
The Bank of Canada discovers that a little post-recession inflation is a good thing
 
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Inside the Market
 
The close: U.S. stocks reverse to red, oil slips amid Delta variant anxiety
 
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Economy
 
Canadian dollar hits two-week high as Federal Reserve stance bolsters sentiment
 
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Technology, telecom and media
 
  Zoom reaches $85-million settlement of lawsuit over user privacy, ‘Zoombombing’
 
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International business
 
  European Union investigates Facebook’s proposed purchase of Kustomer
 
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Small business
 
What it’s like to be a fast-food worker on the front line
 
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Careers
 
  How can I help a co-worker get recategorized for better pay?
 
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In case you missed it
 
Increasing taxes on capital gains would be stifling for Canadian investors
 

cacaroot/Getty Images/iStockphoto

Increasing taxes on capital gains would be stifling for Canadian investors
 

Tim Cestnick

 
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