Globe Style
 

September 22, 2019

 

EDITOR'S NOTE Those crisp fall mornings mean it's time for a wardrobe shift. Start planning with this month's issue of Style Advisor, where we look at that autumn staple, purple, plus heavy metal accessories and Japanese beauty brands. Follow @globestyle on Instagram for more.

 
Need to know
 
Style news: Rose City Goods captures the Instagram aesthetic in housewares
  Style news: Rose City Goods captures the Instagram aesthetic in housewares - Also: Pink Tartan founder Kimberley Newport-Mimran launches evening line; and 13th season of Atlantic Fashion Week takes place Sept. 19 to 22
 

Caitlin Agnew

Toronto boutique Rose City Goods is named after owner Christine Pinese’s hometown of Windsor, Ont., an homage that Pinese says is not without irony. “I really liked the juxtaposition between the shop being full of ethical, handmade goods where Windsor is a very industrial town,” she explains. With several years of fashion retail experience under her belt, Pinese decided to leave the corporate world to open her own store, switching gears to focus on her passion for home decor and taking an ethical, sustainable approach.

 
With an aesthetic Pinese describes as a “modern take on seventies decor,” it’s no accident that Rose City Goods looks like an Instagram feed come to life. “I had the vision in my head for so long. It was basically the brands I was following and obsessing over on Instagram,” Pinese says. The result is a mix of home goods, apothecary, stationery and accessories that are mostly handmade by female entrepreneurs. “It’s really important that, as a female entrepreneur, I’m also supporting other female-owned businesses, having that network and building that community.”

 
 
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What to wear
 
Purple reign: The colour of autumn has a long history
  Purple reign: The colour of autumn has a long history
 

Nathalie Atkinson

According to The Secret Lives of Colour author Kassia St. Clair, the story of purple is bookended by the discovery of two great dyes. The first is Tyrian, the organic dye that was, for centuries, made from mollusks. The time and expense involved in creating Tyrian restricted the ownership of purple attire to the wealthy and privileged, and is one of the reasons it is the symbolic colour of nobility, opulence and religious dignitaries across many cultures. In Japan, for example, deep-purple murasaki was a restricted colour, forbidden to all but the ruling class.

 
The second is the accidental development of mauveine, the first synthetic chemical dye, in 1856. While attempting to formulate an affordable anti-malarial drug, the young British chemist William Perkin accidentally created the process for purple pigment. That same year, Empress Eugénie of France, then Europe’s leading fashionista, started a style craze for purple when she decided lilac would be the colour of the season. Britain’s Queen Victoria followed suit and wore the shade to her daughter’s wedding. Thanks to Perkin’s discovery, the commercial mass production of purple textiles was possible for the first time and the colour trend swiftly expanded from courtly circles to common civilians.

 
 
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Heavy metal: Look for serious hardware embellishing handbags and jewellery this fall
  Heavy metal: Look for serious hardware embellishing handbags and jewellery this fall
 
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Beauty trends
 
Advances in dermatology offer a window into how genetics can predict disease
  Advances in dermatology offer a window into how genetics can predict disease
 

Caitlin Agnew

Having an interest in skin care is often derided as a superficial pursuit, but that’s most certainly not the case in the medical world. Studying the surface of the body means that results of new treatments are both visible and easily quantifiable to doctors and patients. “Skin is a particular opportunity for studying genetics because it’s like a window to cellular mechanisms that are going on inside the body,” says Dr. Sara Brown, professor of molecular and genetic dermatology at the University of Dundee in Scotland.

 
She explains that many common skin diseases, such as eczema, psoriasis, skin cancer and acne, are controlled in part by genetics and in part by the environment. While environmental choices can be managed to an extent, there are major advantages to figuring out the genetics of a disease. “If you can understand the genetic code and how this gives information to the skin, leading to healthy skin or causing disease, then potentially you can design treatments based on [that], rather than just looking at the final results of the disease and trying to reverse it,” she says.

 
 
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With Shiseido’s new research lab, Japan’s influence on the cosmetics world grows
  With Shiseido’s new research lab, Japan’s influence on the cosmetics world grows
 

Caitlin Agnew

 
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Design and decor
 
Ask a designer: I’m bored of my white kitchen cabinets. How do I go bold with colour?
Ask a designer: I’m bored of my white kitchen cabinets. How do I go bold with colour?
 

Beth Hitchcock

Like a crisp, collared shirt, the white kitchen is a classic. But I’m with you: White cabinets are so safe, they’re a little stale. The personality-packed kitchens we’re all ooh-ing and ahh-ing over and keeping in our inspiration files have two things in common, more often than not – a strong decorative point of view and colour.

 
First, give some thought to whether you’re a warm- or cool-colour person. Simple preference plays a role here, as does the size of your space and the quality of natural light it receives. Observe how the movement of the sun changes the mood of the kitchen throughout the day and try the exercise again with paint chips taped to your wall or, better yet, swatch tests painted onto poster board.

 
 
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A treasure trove of Coco Chanel’s furniture has landed in an antique store in Vancouver
  A treasure trove of Coco Chanel’s furniture has landed in an antique store in Vancouver
 

Dave McGinn

 
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Galas
 
Party of the week: TIFF’s inaugural Tribute Gala
  Party of the week: TIFF’s inaugural Tribute Gala
 

Nolan Bryant

 
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Style Advisor Magazine
 
Read the September 2019 issue of Style Advisor, exclusively for subscribers
 
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