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Change is hard – everyone knows that. The problem is that the status quo, while comforting, can also be dangerous. If you refuse to move forward, you may be left behind.

It is far easier to dismiss an idea if you discredit the person who espouses it as nothing more than a lazy millennial whiner. But this results in good ideas being ignored. By over-diagnosing an entire generation as lazy whiners, law firms are giving themselves an easy excuse not to change. The irony is that tech-savvy millennials (who also understand how other millennials think) are well suited to help firms adapt to the changing landscape. Full story.

Banff businesses brace for surge of visitors
 

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Businesses in Banff are bracing for a banner year as numerous factors drive tourists to the mountain town, including the federal government's offer of free admission to all national parks to mark Canada's 150th anniversary. Full story.

Modern furniture retailer faces classic kinks in customer service
 

When Victor Tam bought a condo in 2010, he wanted to furnish it in Scandinavian style without falling for the familiar trappings of IKEA. Looking around, he found that many retailers were "ridiculously priced," with sofas so costly he thought he could otherwise furnish an entire room. Full story.

Small businesses can be easy targets for hackers

As more organizations make the shift to digital, the threat of contracting viruses or suffering a data breach increases. Arguably the most vulnerable organizations are small businesses and non-profits, who often do not have dedicated IT teams in-house to shield and protect against threats or guide employees toward digital best practices. Full story.

Toronto bar owner settles legal dispute over partner's debts

A continuing legal action brought by Royal Bank of Canada against the owner of a popular downtown Toronto bar has come to an end.

The bank and Rachel Conduit have settled a dispute in which RBC obtained a court order that she repay over $70,000 that stemmed from the personal debts of her former business partner and not the bar they operated. Full story.

Uber co-founder's startup accelerator expands to Vancouver

A Silicon Valley startup accelerator known for its deep pockets and high-profile leadership is expanding to Vancouver.

Expa Labs, which grew out of a company started by Uber co-founder Garrett Camp, launched last year in New York and San Francisco. Earlier this month, it begun recruiting the first group of companies for its Canadian program, which will begin in June. Full story.

More small business news from around the web

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Rags to riches? Why the privileged are more likely to become entrepreneurs

When 28-year old Cam Worth had the idea for his agency SharpEnd three years ago, he knew he would struggle to get it off the ground. Investors weren't interested in a company specialising in advising businesses about the internet of things in 2014 and, although he was working full time, he had no money, assets or savings to back it himself. Full story.

How small firms can defuse a political threat and blunt a boycott

One winter's day, Nicole Morgenthau received an email that jolted her. She owns Finch Knitting and Sewing Studio in Leesburg, Va., and the note threatened her beloved store with a potential boycott. Full story.

Two retirees create marijuana packaging business in Colorado

Deb Baker, a retired high school teacher, and Barb Diner, a former marketing executive, found the relaxed retirement life a bit dull, so they would often bat around ideas that might be interesting to pursue and that could supplement their income. Full story

Why you should hire whole teams instead of one by one

After Endeavour Mining acquired True Gold Mining last April, the junior company's executive team in Vancouver found itself out of a job. It was not as though they'd failed—quite the opposite. "We took that company from 18¢ [per share] to over a dollar in a year," says Christian Milau, True Gold's suddenly ex-CEO. The team had brought a mine into production in Burkina Faso, hardly an easy operating environment, and felt it had something special going on. Full story.

Compiled by Sarah Efron

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