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JANUARY

Milt Dunnell, 102

Toronto Star sports columnist for more than half a century, he covered New York Yankees pitcher Don Larsen's perfect game in the 1956 World Series, Northern Dancer's Kentucky Derby win in 1964, Muhammad Ali's Thrilla in Manila in 1975 and a lot more before and after.

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Sir Edmund Hillary 88

A "no-hoper" at university, he became the most famous beekeeper in New Zealand when he and Tenzing Norgay, his Sherpa guide, conquered Mt. Everest on May 29, 1953, a feat that was announced the day Elizabeth II was crowned. Everest was the peak in a lifetime of exploration--pioneering a new route to the South Pole on a modified farm tractor, searching for the Yeti in Tibet, jet-boating up the Ganges to its source--that some attribute to his childhood passion for the meringue pinnacles on his mother's Pavlova.

Philip Agee, 72

CIA spy and suspected KGB double agent, he turned against the agency and wrote the exposé Inside the Company: CIA Diary.

Dusty Cohl, 78

Cowboy-hatted film buff and world class schmoozer, he co-founded the Toronto International Film Festival.

Judah Folkman, 74

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A vascular biologist, whose theory that malignant tumours can be starved by choking their blood supply, encouraged the development of drugs such as Avastin.

Bobby Fischer, 64

By defeating Soviet chess master Boris Spassky in 1972, in a match that was trumpeted as the triumph of democracy over communism, the media shy Mr. Fischer became a reluctant American hero and the game soared in popularity.

John McHale, 86

He brought the Expos to life in Montreal and ran the club for nearly two decades.

Talivaldis Kenins, 88

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Latvian-born music teacher and innovator, he composed chamber music, symphonies, concertos, and cantatas.

Robert Lemieux, 66

Lawyer and sovereigntist, he negotiated for the FLQ after the kidnapping of James Cross and the murder of Pierre Laporte and unsuccessfully defended the accused as "political prisoners."

Heath Ledger, 28

Named after Heathcliff, Emily Bronte's tragic romantic hero, the Australian actor ( Brokeback Mountain, The Dark Knight) was remembered by his parents as "the most amazing 'old soul' in a young man's body" after he died of an accidental drug overdose.

Suharto, 86

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The self-styled "Smiling General," and president of Indonesia (1967-1998), was lauded in the West until the collapse of the Soviet Union turned a critical flashlight on his flagrant human-rights abuses and the Asian financial crisis exposed his regime's corruption and nepotism.

Robert Weaver, 87

Literary editor and CBC Radio producer who nurtured the nascent talent of Alice Munro, Mordecai Richler, Mavis Gallant, Margaret Laurence and Al Purdy.

Here is the annotated list of the people who died in 2008 and whose lives were commemorated in obituaries in The Globe and Mail in January.

  • Erich Kaestner, 107, German WWI veteran, Jan 1
  • Ed Barroll, 84, oil executive, Jan. 1
  • Robert L'Herbier, 86 broadcaster, Jan 1
  • James Tedlie, 91, soldier, Jan. 1
  • Joyce Carlson, 84, Disney cartoonist, Jan 2
  • Gerry Staley, 87, pitcher, Jan 2
  • Petru Dugulescu, 62, Romanian cleric, Jan 3
  • Robert Fitzhenry, 89, publisher, Jan 3
  • Milt Dunnell, 102, sports journalist, Jan 3
  • Mllungisi Sisulu, 42, grandson of ANC leader Walter Sisulu, Jan 3
  • John Ashley, 77, NHL referee, Jan 5
  • Edward Klosinski, 65, Polish cinematographer, Jan 5
  • Heinz Niederhauser, 72, baker, Jan 5
  • Don Robertson, 82, TV producer, Jan. 6
  • Philip Agee, 72, spy, Jan 7.
  • Bill Belew, 76, costumer, Jan 7
  • Buddy Leroux, 77, Red Sox owner, Jan 7
  • Bozo Miller, 89, glutton, Jan 7
  • Ernie Avrith, 82, retailer, Jan. 8
  • Jim Dooley, 77, football coach, Jan 8
  • Gilbert Harrison, 92 editor of The New Republic, Jan 8
  • Johnny Grant, 84, booster, Jan 9
  • Jacques Langlais, 86, priest Jan 9
  • Richard Ruggles, 84, cartographer, Jan. 9
  • Joseph Shaw, 87, actor, Jan. 9
  • Ike Shulman, 91, lawyer, Jan 9
  • Lew Spence, 87, composer and lyricist Jan. 9
  • Christopher Bowman, 40, skater, Jan 10
  • Allan McEachern, 81, judge, Jan 10
  • Sir Edmund Hillary, 88, mountaineer, Jan 11
  • Maila Nurmi, 85, actress, Jan 10
  • Dusty Cohl, 78, TIFF co-founder Jan 11
  • Jim Faraday, 65, musician, Jan. 12
  • Gabriel Osorio, 82 Spanish poet Jan 12
  • Chuck Weir, 73, writer, Jan 12
  • Joe Burk, 93, sculler, Jan. 13
  • Johnny Podres, 75, pitcher, Jan 13
  • Don Cardwell, 72, pitcher, Jan 14
  • Judah Folkman 74, oncologist, Jan. 14
  • Richard Knerr, 82, hula hoop inventor, Jan 14
  • Jim Panton, 93, broad jumper, Jan. 14
  • Peter Staudhammer, 73, engineer, Jan. 14
  • Michael Pyryt, 54, educator, Jan. 15
  • Brad Renfro, 25, actor, Jan 15
  • Artyom Sergeyev, 86, Soviet general Jan 15
  • Ernie Holmes, 59, football player, Jan 17
  • Bobby Fischer, 64, chess master, Jan 17
  • Edward Dentinger Hoch 77 crime fiction writer Jan 17
  • Mildred Callaghan Jones, 64, flag maker, Jan 17
  • John McHale 86 Expos mgr. Jan 17.
  • Madeleine Milhaud, 105, librettist, Jan. 17
  • Michelle Jackson, 34, filmmaker Jan. 18
  • Jimmy James, 92, veteran and POW, Jan 18
  • Lois Nettleton, 80, actress, Jan 18
  • Frances Lewine, 86, journalist, Jan 19
  • Suzanne Pleschette, 70, actress, Jan 19
  • Eugene Sawyer, 73, Mayor Chicago Jan. 19
  • Louis de Cazenave, 110, French WWI vet, Jan 20
  • Marie Smith Jones, 89, native leader, Jan 21
  • Talivaldis Kenins, 88, composer, Jan. 21
  • Robert Lemieux, 66, FLQ lawyer, Jan 21
  • Kenneth Parnell, 76, child molester, Jan 21
  • Rudolph Spruengli, 88, Swiss chocolate heir, Jan 21
  • Mike Cacic, 71, football player Jan. 22
  • Heath Ledger, 28, actor, Jan. 22
  • Miles Lerman, 88, resistance fighter, Jan 22
  • Louis Martin, 72, journalist, Jan 22
  • Helena Weider, 101, entrepreneur, Jan 22
  • David Askevold, 67, artist, Jan 23
  • Steve Duplantis, 35, caddie, Jan 23
  • Conrad Furey, 53, artist, Jan 23
  • Brad Davis, 34 lawyer and politico Jan 24
  • Louis-Phillippe de Grandpre, 90, judge, Jan 24
  • Wally West, 92, photographer, Jan. 24
  • Milton Wolff, 92, U.S. volunteer in the Spanish Civil War, Jan 24
  • Louisa Horton, 87, actress, Jan 25
  • Zhang Hanzhi, 73, interpreter, Jan 26
  • Shannon Bloomfield 12, equestrian, Jan. 27
  • Robert Weaver, 87, Canlit anthologist and mentor Jan 27
  • Gordon Hinckley, 97, Mormon, Jan 27
  • Dalton Robertson, 80, journalist, Jan 27
  • James Sorenson 86, inventor Jan 27
  • Suharto, 86, President of Indonesia, Jan 27.
  • Louis Welch, 89, mayor of Houston Jan. 27
  • Archbishop Christodoulos, 69, church leader, Jan 28
  • Adrian DiCastri, 55 architect, Jan 29
  • Raymond Jacobs, 82, Iwo Jima marine Jan 29
  • Margaret Truman Daniel, 83 U.S. President Harry Truman's daughter, Jan 29
  • Miles Kington, 66, humorist, Jan 30
  • Marcial Maciel, 87, Catholic priest, Jan 30

FEBRUARY

Barry Morse, 89

As the implacable policeman Philip Gerard, he relentlessly chased David Janssen, the wrongly accused murderer on The Fugitive, the hit 1960s television show, and made himself universally loathed. "I got more hate mail than anyone since Adolf Hitler," Mr. Morse complained cheerfully. A versatile and prolific veteran of the fledgling days of CBC TV, the actor was also briefly the artistic director of The Shaw Festival.

Maharishi Mahesh Yogi, 91

Guru to the Beatles, he originated the Transcendental Meditation movement in the 1950s and later bought two islands off the coast of Nova Scotia where he planned, but never erected, an international peace palace.

Willie P. Bennett, 56

A reluctant star, Willie P. Bennett was a singer songwriter in the 1970s folk music scene that made headliners of Bruce Cockburn and Stan Rogers. His hits included White Line and Music in Your Eyes.

William F. Buckley Jr., 82

A libertarian and a public intellectual, he founded the biweekly conservative magazine National Review, hosted Firing Line, the Emmy-winning TV interview show for more than three decades, and wrote a nationally syndicated newspaper column. On the side, he was a prolific and erudite writer of novels and polemics, beginning with God and Man at Yale, his first and best known book.

Earl Butz, 98

Secretary of Agriculture under Richard Nixon, he was forced to eat his own words when his vulgar and racist remark about the clothing tastes and personal hygiene habits of African Americans was so widely reported that the President fired him.

Roy Scheider, 75

A former boxer, whose broken nose and pugnacious style earned him kudos in The French Connection, he uttered the famous line, "You're gonna need a bigger boat," as Martin Brody, the traumatized police chief in a resort town terrorized by a killer shark in Steven Spielberg's film Jaws.

Buddy Miles, 60

He played drums for Jimi Hendrix and later had the hit song Them Changes.

Milt Harradence, 85

As a criminal lawyer, he learned his courtroom techniques by aping a pro - his childhood hero and family friend, John George Diefenbaker. A mentor to young lawyers, including the boxer Willie de Wit, he sat on the Alberta Court of Appeal and, as a private citizen, collected and flew vintage airplanes, including an F-86 Sabre - at a time when many good-sized countries were still using it as a fighter plane in their armed forces.

Here is the annotated list of the people who died in 2008 and whose lives were commemorated in obituaries in The Globe and Mail in February.

  • Floyd Boring, 92, presidential bodyguard, Feb. 1
  • Verita Bouvaire, 89, actress, Feb. 1
  • Frank Butler, 65, athletic director, Feb 1
  • Shell Kepler, 49, actress, Feb 1
  • David Stogdon, 89, boat designer, Feb. 1
  • Earl Butz, 89, politician, Feb 2
  • Joshua Lederberg, 82, physician, Feb. 2
  • Barry Morse, 89, actor, Feb. 2
  • Samuel Pennington, 78, collector, Feb. 2
  • Ed Vargo, 79, umpire, Feb. 2
  • Ernesto Lilly, 82, coffee mogul, Feb 3
  • Tata Guines, 77, Cuban drummer, Feb. 4
  • Harry Landis, 108 WWI vet, Feb. 4
  • William Lindsay, 87, surgeon, Feb. 5
  • Maharishi Mahesh Yogi, 91 Transcendental Meditation guru, Feb. 5
  • Bill Stapleton, 92, artist, Feb. 5
  • John Alvin, 59, illustrator, Feb. 6
  • Ruth Stafford Peale, 101, guru Feb. 6
  • Tony Rolt, 89, POW and car racer, Feb. 6
  • Fra Andrew Bertie, 78, Knights of Malta Feb. 7
  • Janis Spence, 61, dramaturge, Feb. 7
  • Frank Dixon, 87, immunologist, Feb. 8
  • Robert Jastrow, 82, physicist, Feb. 8
  • Phyllis Whitney, 104, writer, Feb. 8
  • Freddie Bell, 76, singer, Feb. 10
  • Inga Nielsen 61, singer, Feb 10
  • Ron Leavitt, 60, actor, Feb. 10
  • Roy Scheider, 75, actor, Feb. 10
  • Shakh Aivazov, 52, Georgian businessman, Feb. 11
  • Boris Celovsky, 84, double agent, Feb. 11
  • Len Gibson, 81, choreographer, Feb. 11
  • Tom Lantos, 80, politician, Feb. 11
  • Torakichi Nakamura, 92, Japanese golfer, Feb. 11
  • Frank Piasecki, 88, helicopter engineer, Feb. 11
  • David Groh, 68, actor, Feb. 12
  • Saul Harris, 89, holocaust survivor, Feb. 12
  • Michele Greco, 83, Mafiosa, Feb. 13
  • Kon Ichikawa, 92, film director, Feb. 13
  • Vuk Obradovic, 61, Yugoslav General, Feb. 13
  • Henri Salvador, 90, singer, Feb. 13
  • Louis Shevon, 92, hockey timekeeper, Feb. 13
  • Lionel Smith, 62, actor, Feb. 13
  • Sam Estwick, 92, Black veteran, Feb. 13
  • Roger Louis Voisin, 89, trumpeter, Feb. 13
  • John McMulkin, 92, engineer, Feb 18
  • Sidney Watters, 90, trainer, Feb. 14
  • Cyril Abery, 71 Nfld bureaucrat, Feb. 15
  • Willie P. Bennett, 56, folk singer, Feb. 15
  • Jerry Karl, 66, Indy 500 driver, Feb. 15
  • Elizabeth Mawson, 81, actress, Feb. 16
  • James Orange, 65, civil rights activist, Feb. 16
  • Erna Wallisch, 85, Nazi guard, Feb. 16
  • Moises Castillo, 86, Guatemalan thug, Feb. 17
  • Bill Juzda, 87, hockey player, Feb. 17
  • Morris Miller, 83, economist, Feb. 17
  • Val Ross, 57, journalist, Feb. 17
  • Alain Robbe-Grillet, 85, writer, Feb. 18
  • Vuniew High, 92, schoolteacher, Feb. 18
  • Elspie Shaver, 95, pediatrician, Feb. 18
  • Natalia Bessmertnova, 66, dancer, Feb. 19
  • Bob Howsam, 89, baseball GM, Feb. 19
  • Peter Johnston, 86, diplomat, Feb 19
  • Ted Macero, 82, music producer, Feb. 19
  • Lydia Shum, 60, entertainer, Feb. 19
  • Jordan Pearlson, 83, Rabbi, Feb. 19
  • David Watkin, 82, cinematographer, Feb. 19
  • Ben Chapman, 79, actor, Feb. 21
  • Neil Chotem, 87, pianist, Feb. 21
  • Magda Cordell McHale, 86, painter, Feb. 21
  • Robin Moore, 82, thriller writer, Feb. 21
  • Johnnie Carr, 99, civil rights activist, Feb. 22
  • Eagle Day, 75, football player, Feb. 22
  • Len Walters, 76, boxer, Feb. 22
  • Charles Willis, 90, RCAF pilot, Feb. 22
  • Janez Drnovsek, 57, Slovenian Pres., Feb. 23
  • Douglas Fraser, 91, UAW Pres., Feb. 23
  • Jimmy Kilburn, 85, hockey player, Feb. 23
  • Denis Lazure, 82, politician, Feb. 23
  • Pearl Cornioley, 93, spy, Feb. 24
  • Nancy Fleming, 76, book publishing executive, Feb. 24
  • Genoa Leilani Keawe, 89, Hawaiian singer, Feb. 25
  • William F. Buckley Jr., 82, pundit, Feb. 26
  • Frank Howard, 77 journalist, Feb. 26
  • Buddy Miles, 60, drummer, Feb. 26
  • Dan Shomron, 70, Israeli Commander, Feb. 26
  • Boyd Coddington, 63, hot rod driver, Feb. 27
  • Myron Cope, 79, sports announcer, Feb. 27
  • Bill Heinz, war correspondent, Feb. 27
  • Brian Jones, 57, painter, Feb. 27
  • Ray Kane, musician, Feb. 27
  • Michelle Swenarchuk, 59, activist, Feb. 27
  • Mev Berman, 81, musician, Feb. 28
  • Bud Downing, 84, liquor executive, Feb. 28
  • Milt Harradence, 86, judge, Feb. 28
  • Joseph Juran, 103, consultant, Feb. 28
  • Katoucha Niane, 47, model, Feb. 28
  • Len Peterson, scriptwriter, Feb. 28
  • Mike Smith, 64, singer, Feb. 28
  • Buddy Dial, 71, football player, Feb. 29
  • Vitaly Fedorchuk, 89, KGB head, Feb. 29
  • Samuel Hamrick, 78, spy novelist, Feb. 29
  • Ralph Hansch, 85, hockey player, Feb. 29
  • Tsuneyo Toyonaga, 113, oldest Japanese, Feb. 29

MARCH

Simon Reisman, 88

As a young Communist sympathizer in Montreal, or as Brian Mulroney's tough-talking, cigar- chomping, free-trade negotiator with the Americans, he spoke with brutal frankness to his superiors, his colleagues and his subordinates. Underneath, he was loyal and true. Born the son of a factory worker, Mr. Reisman earned two economics degrees, served as a troop commander in the Italian campaign during the Second World War, and then joined the federal civil service where he earned his stripes working on the GATT treaty and the Auto Pact. He took early retirement in 1975, but was called back to negotiate the FTA talks in the mid 1980s.

Jeff Healey, 41

Cancer robbed him of his eyes when he was a baby, but it didn't stop him from learning to play the guitar as a toddler, by stretching the instrument across his lap. His hits included Angel Eyes, Hideaway, and a cover of the Beatles' While My Guitar Gently Weeps. But he grew weary of bands, bars and the rock scene and began playing American jazz from the 1920s and 1930s. He returned to rock for the album, Mess of Blues, which was released a month after he died of cancer.

Arthur C. Clarke, 90

A visionary, he gave the world HAL 9000 (Heuristically programmed ALgorithmic Computer) the sentient artificial intelligence aboard the spaceship Discovery. Stanley Kubrick turned Mr. Clarke's 2001: A Space Odyssey saga into the film with Canadian actor Douglas Rain playing Hal's soft, discursive, voice. Mr. Clarke, the British-born son of an engineer, moved to Colombo in 1956 to think about the universe and to plumb the ocean along the coast of Sri Lanka.

Anthony Minghella, 54

A writer as well as a director, he transformed Michael Ondaatje's poetic novel, The English Patient, into a cinematic treasure - despite breaking his own ankle during shooting - that won nine Oscars, including direction and best picture. He also directed The Talented Mr. Ripley, Cold Mountain and Breaking and Entering.

Geoffrey Pearson, 80

His poker face belied his dry wit and, at school, earned him the nickname Joker. He followed his famous father, Liberal prime minister Lester B. Pearson, into External Affairs, where the diplomat eventually became Ambassador to Moscow and Pierre Trudeau's special representative on nuclear arms control.

Paul Scofield, 86

A British stage actor, who never lived more than 15 kilometres from the village where he was born in West Sussex, he often turned down roles because he didn't want to leave home. A contemporary of Laurence Olivier and John Gielgud, he practised the art of stillness - the ability to convey complex emotions and thoughts with a twitch, a glance or a pause. His greatest fame came from reprising his stage role as Sir Thomas More, the Tudor statesman executed for treason in 1535, after clashing with King Henry VIII, in the film version of A Man for All Seasons.

Here is the annotated list of the people who died in 2008 and whose lives were commemorated in obituaries in The Globe and Mail in March.

  • Bhanubhakta Gurung, 86, VC winner, March 1
  • Jeff Healey, 41 guitarist, Mar 2
  • Frederick Seitz, 96, physicist March 2
  • Ramon Barquin, 93, March 3
  • Giuseppe Di Stefano, 86, opera singer, March 3
  • Malcolm McKenna, 77, academic, March 3
  • Paul Raymond, 82, pornographer, March 3
  • Margaret Kidd, 89, day care advocate, March 4
  • Leonard Rosenman, 83, composer, March 4
  • George Walter, 79, politician, March 4
  • Jim Skelton, 97, tennis player, March 5
  • Joseph Weizenbaum, 85, computer scientist, March 5
  • Leon Greenman, 97, POW, March 6
  • Stanislav Konopasek, hockey player, March 6
  • Mona O'Hearn, 86, actor, March 6
  • Malvin Wald, 90, screenwriter, March 6
  • David Gale, 86, mathematician, March 7
  • Raymond LeBlanc, 81, busker, March 7
  • Ron Nelson, 84, hockey player, March 7
  • Francis Pym, 86, politician, March 7
  • Donald C. MacDonald, 94, politician, March 8
  • Remi Tourangeau, 69, Catholic brother, March 8
  • Richard Paudyn, 86, Polish patriot, March 9
  • Simon Reisman, 88, trade negotiator, March 9
  • Dick Burke, bike inventor, March 10
  • Otto Schnellbacher, 84, football player, March 10
  • Dave Stevens, comic, March 10
  • Michael J. Todd, Manchester Police Chief, March 11
  • Mickey Walker, 90, hockey player, March 11
  • Michael Sohn, actor, March 12
  • Rafael Tufino, 85, painter, March 13
  • Tom Tuohy, 90, chemist, March 12
  • Lazare Ponticelli, French WWI veteran, March 12
  • Harriet Winspear, 103, philanthropist, March 13
  • Chiara Lubich, Catholic activist and founder of Focolare Movement, March 14
  • Niles Jordan, 82, baseball player, March 15
  • David Low, 52, astronaut, March 15
  • Vicki Van Meter, child pilot, March 15
  • Ken Reardon, hockey player, March 15
  • Ivan Dixon, actor, March 16
  • Mary Meader, 91, aviator, March 16
  • Armando Vasquez, 86, baseball player, March 16
  • Liza Samuel, volunteer, March 16
  • Metropolitan Laurus, Russian Orthodox church, March 16
  • Roland Arnall, 68, banker, March 17
  • Lionel Harrison, 78, chemist, March 17
  • Claus Luthe, 75, car engineer, March 17
  • John Basmajian, 86, doctor, March 18
  • Laurie Cashin, 67, negotiator, March 18
  • Ross Clouston, 85, fishmonger, March 18
  • Peter Johnston, diplomat, 86, March 18
  • Anthony Minghella, 54, film director, March 18
  • Geoffrey Pearson, 80, diplomat, March 18
  • Sam Walsh, 91, politician, March 18
  • Arthur C. Clarke, 90, scientist and writer, March 19
  • Hugo Claus, novelist, March 19
  • Bill Fisher, 90, industrial designer, March 19
  • Philip Jones Griffiths, 72, photojournalist, March 19
  • Michael Lesch, 68, doctor, March 19
  • Paul Scofield, 86, actor, March 19
  • Carl Grauer, 90, lacrosse player, March 20
  • Edith Strauss, 88, designer, March 20
  • Clayton Derstine, 79, writer, March 21
  • George Gross, 85, Toronto Sun sports editor, March 21
  • William Kraushaar, 87, astronomer, March 21
  • Margery Cambon Quail, 90, nurse, March 21
  • Waltrude Schleyer, 92, widow of crime victim, March 21
  • Rafael Azcona, 81, novelist, March 22
  • Franz Stigler, 92, Luftwaffe pilot, March 22
  • George Finlayson, 80, Judge, March 23
  • Bernard Jesse, 90 WWII POW, March 23
  • George Switzer, 92, scientist, March 23
  • Neil Aspinall, 66, Beatles Road Manager, March 24
  • Haydn Davies, 86, sculptor, March 24
  • John Herlitz, 65, car designer, March 24
  • Richard Widmark, actor, March 24
  • Art Aragon, 80 boxer, March 25
  • Jack Cross, 96, civil servant, March 25
  • Abby Mann, scriptwriter, March 25
  • Philippe Garigue, 90, bilingualism advocate, March 25
  • Herb Peterson, Egg McMffin inventor, March 25
  • Lyle Thurston, 70, Greenpeace doctor, March 25
  • Ivan Toms, 55, doctor, March 25
  • Robert Fagles, 74, classicist, March 26
  • Manuel Marulanda, FARC guerrilla leader, March 26
  • Billy Consolo, 73, baseball player, March 27
  • Norman Crossman, 74 New Brunswick politician, March 27
  • Angus Fairhurst, painter, March 29
  • Harvey Picker, 92, physicist and health care advocate, March 29
  • Ralph Rapson, 93, architect, March 29
  • Sean LeVert, 39, singer, March 30
  • Katsuyuki Sugita, 65, Japanese banker, March 30
  • Nikolai Baibakov, 97, commissar, March 31
  • Jules Dassin, 96, film director, March 31
  • Peter Gutowski, 72, pilot, March 31
  • Jean Herbiet, 77, NAC artist director, March 31

APRIL

Beryl Plumptre, 99

With stagflation rampant, prime minister Pierre Trudeau named the 64-year old Mrs. Plumptre chair of the Food Prices Review Board. Her appointment was ridiculed until the rotten-egg scandal of 1974. The Canadian Egg Marketing Agency, established by tough-talking agriculture minister Eugene Whelan, had created such "eggflation" that warehouses were bulging with 28 million rotten eggs. Overnight, Mrs. Plumptre, who had lobbied to have marketing boards dismantled, was transformed from scapegoat into champion.

Charlton Heston, 84

Devoutly religious and a fervent supporter of frontier values and the right to bear arms, Mr. Heston got his break as an actor because of his looks, not his beliefs. In the early 1950s, Cecil B. DeMille saw the young actor's muscular physique and steely gaze and cast him as Moses in The Ten Commandments. Specializing in macho characters, including Judah Ben Hur, Michelangelo, and John the Baptist, he once said: "I have played three presidents, three saints and two geniuses. If that doesn't create an ego problem, nothing does."

Maggy Reeves, 85

Born Margarethe Weisz in Austria, she found her name and her vocation in Canada. With backing from her client, Reva Joseph, she opened the Maggy Reeves Salon in Toronto in 1957. Her signature designs were embellished with beading, quilting and embroidery and she once made a cream coloured jacket for publisher Jack McClelland decorated with the names, titles and cover designs of his favourite M&S authors.

Edward Lorenz, 90

An American meteorologist, he tried unsuccessfully to predict the weather using computer models and in analyzing his failure he pioneered chaos theory, the concept that small disturbances can create enormous consequences, or "the butterfly effect."

Albert Hofmann, 102

While studying the medicinal uses of a common fungus, the chemist isolated lysergic acid diethylamide-25 in a Swiss lab in 1938. When he repeated the experiment five years later, he spilled some LSD on his finger, an accident that induced "wonderful visions." Three days later he took a larger dose and experienced the world's first scientifically documented bad trip. He hoped that LSD would contribute to psychiatric research, but its greatest fame came when Timothy Leary urged everybody to "turn on, tune in and drop out" in the 1960s.

Here is the annotated list of the people who died in 2008 and whose lives were commemorated in obituaries in The Globe and Mail in April.

  • Sherry Britton, 89 burlesque dancer. Apr. 1
  • Sam Gesser, 78, impresario, Apr. 1
  • Harry Levine, 89, dept. store head, Apr. 1
  • Jake Warren, 87, diplomat, Apr. 1
  • Ray Poole, 86, football player, Apr. 2
  • Peter Baczako, 56, weightlifter, Apr. 2
  • Sabin Balasa, 76, Romanian painter, Apr 2
  • Wayne Frost, 44, dancer, Apr. 3
  • Bill Giokas, 80, hockey player, Apr. 4
  • Corinne McLuhan, 95, wife, Apr. 4
  • Beryl Plumptre, 99 consumer advocate, Apr. 4
  • Charlton Heston, 84, actor, Apr 5
  • Kaku Yamanaka, 113, Japanese oldest person, Apr. 5
  • Ruth Greenglass, 84, spy, Apr 7
  • Cedella Booker, 81 Bob Marlee's Mom, Apr. 8
  • Lois Murphy, 91, pediatric oncologist, Apr. 8
  • Burt Gunn, 82, photojournalist, Apr. 9
  • Daniela Klemenschits, 25, tennis player, Apr. 9
  • Maggy Reeves, 85, couturier, Apr. 9
  • Ernesto Corripio Ahumada, 88, cleric, Apr. 10
  • Nona Beamer, 84, Hawaiian entertainer, Apr. 10
  • Merlin German, 22, soldier, Apr. 11
  • Hans Mohr, 80, social scientist, Apr. 11
  • Cecilia Colledge, 87 Olympic skater, Apr. 12
  • Polly Tunney, 100, socialite and wife, Apr. 12
  • Jerry Zucker, 58, American who bought The Bay, Apr. 12
  • Wally Kleine, 43, football player, Apr. 13
  • David Morgan, 78, peace activist, Apr. 13
  • John Wheeler, 96, black hole physicist, Apr. 13
  • Frank Carson, 79, businessman, Apr. 14
  • Jamaica Jackson, 26, football player, Apr. 14
  • Ollie Johnston, 95, Disney cartoonist, Apr. 14
  • Werner Groebli, 92, skater, Apr. 14
  • Tommy Holmes, 91 baseball player, Apr. 14
  • Hazel Court, 82, actress, Apr. 15
  • Edward Lorenz, 90, chaos theorist, Apr. 16
  • Joseph Solman, 99, painter, Apr. 16
  • Bob Bierman, 86, cartoonist, Apr. 17
  • Aime Cesaire, 94, poet, Apr. 17
  • Danny Federici, 58, Springsteen band, Apr. 17
  • Clem Hiltz, 96, fisherman, Apr. 17
  • Peter Howard, 80, musician, Apr. 18
  • Kate Phillips, 94, actress, Apr. 18
  • John Marzano, 45, baseball player, Apr. 19
  • Errol Wintmute, 91, lumber man, Apr. 19
  • Keith Hunt, 88, CN tower engineer, Apr. 21!
  • Claude Joncas, 77, judge, Apr. 21
  • Geoff Polites, 60, Ford executive, Apr. 21
  • Ed Chynoweth, 66, WHL president, Apr. 22
  • William Stewart, 86, U.S. surgeon-general, Apr. 22
  • Dick Dillon, 87, soldier and civil servant, Apr. 23
  • Joe Feeney, 76, tenor, Apr. 23
  • Darell Garretson, 76, NBA referee, Apr. 23
  • Martha Kostuch, 58, veterinarian, April 23
  • William Irvine, 66, political scientist, Apr. 23
  • Bill Burk, 75, columnist, Apr. 24
  • Tristram Cary, 82, electronics designer, Apr 24
  • Harry Geris, 60 Olympic wrestler, April 24
  • John McConnell, 84, steel magnate, Apr. 25
  • Joy Page, 83, actress, Apr. 25
  • Henry Brant, 94, composer, Apr. 26
  • Yossi Harel, 90, Zionist, Apr. 26
  • Phil Harison, 82, golfer, Apr. 27
  • Eric Layman, 64, writer, Apr. 27
  • Sallie Wilson, 76, dancer, Apr. 27
  • Frances Yeend, 95, soprano, Apr. 27
  • Hans Eder, 81, Olympic skier, Apr. 28
  • Ed Marion, 81, linesman, Apr. 28
  • Will Robinson, 96 coach, Apr. 28
  • Diana Barnato Walker, 90, pilot, Apr. 28
  • Cameron Argetsinger, 87, car racing promoter, Apr 29
  • Albert Hofmann, 102, LSD chemist, Apr. 29
  • Peter Roberts, 63, doctor Apr. 29
  • Bo Yang, 88, writer, Apr. 29

MAY

Buzzie Bavasi, 93

His parents called him Emil, but his sister dubbed him Buzzie because he was "always buzzing around." General manager of the Dodgers from 1951 to 1968, his clubs won eight National League pennants and four World Series with star players such as Sandy Koufax, Don Drysdale, Jackie Robinson, Duke Snider, Roy Campanella and Maury Wills.

Charles Caccia, 78

Known as the environmental conscience of the Liberal Party, the Italian-born trade analyst and politician was elected in the Trudeaumania sweep of 1968 and served as an MP and cabinet minister for the next three decades.

Arthur Kroeger, 75

The son of Mennonites from Ukraine, he grew up hungry in Alberta during the Depression, won a Rhodes Scholarship in the mid-1950s, and then joined the Canadian Civil Service. Known as the "dean of deputy ministers," he served for more than three decades, offering wise and prudent counsel to prime ministers of varying political persuasions.

Robert Rauschenberg, 82

A prolific American artist who blurred the boundaries between painting, photography, printmaking and sculpture, he combined objects and media in an effervescently intuitive and inventive way. Broke and unknown, he made collages out of junk he found in the streets; later, when he was rich and famous, he worked on vast international collaborations but always with the same experimental spirit.

Eddy Arnold, 89

Country singer, actor and canny investor, Mr. Arnold, "The Tennessee Plowboy," once advised a young singer, "Get a good lawyer, a good accountant and be on time." His mellow baritone delivered hits with That's How Much I Love You (1946), I'll Hold You in My Heart (1947), Bouquet of Roses (1948) and Make the World Go Away (1965).

Robert Mondavi, 94

After a row with his younger brother, he quit Charles Krug, his family's modest wine business and started his own winery in the Napa valley in 1966. A stellar salesman and promoter, he organized the "Judgment of Paris" a decade later, a blind tasting in which several Californian wines beat out French vintages. Once the sixth-largest winery in the U.S., Mondavi went public in 1993 and was sold to Constellation in 2004.

Jack Duffy, 81

A ringer for Frank Sinatra, he sang with the Tommy Dorsey band in the 1940s, appeared regularly on The Perry Como Show in the 1960s and was a fixture on Canadian variety shows, including the long running Party Game in the 1970s.

Hamilton Jordan, 63

A whiz kid political strategist, he managed Jimmy Carter's campaign for governor of Georgia and helped propel the peanut farmer into the White House. After losing his own race for a Senate seat, he became disillusioned with big-party politics and supported maverick Ross Perot's presidential bid in 1992.

Sydney Pollack, 73

An actor and director with a penchant for appearing in his own movies, Mr. Pollack won an Oscar for Out of Africa, starring Meryl Streep and Robert Redford, and was nominated as a director for several more including They Shoot Horses, Don't They? with Jane Fonda and Tootsie with Dustin Hoffman. In Michael Clayton, his last big film, he was both producer and actor, playing the sinister lawyer who browbeats George Clooney.

Here is the annotated list of the people who died in 2008 and whose lives were commemorated in obituaries in The Globe and Mail in May.

  • Buzzie Bavasi, 93, Dodgers GM, May 1
  • Philipp von Boeselager, 90, German patriot, May 1
  • Jim Hager, 66, comic, May 1
  • Ian Berry, 65, musician, May 2
  • Martha Coughlin, 94, war widow, May 2
  • Mildred Loving, 68, activist, May 2
  • Bob Couchman, 71, social welfare activist, May 3
  • Don Doner, 85, soldier, May 3
  • Ted Key, cartoonist, May 3
  • Charles Caccia, 78, politician, May 3
  • Leopold Sotelo, 82, Spanish prime minister, May 3
  • Morgan Sparks, 91, scientist, May 3
  • Frederic Baur, 89, Pringles can inventor, May 4
  • Alvin Colt, 91, costumer, May 4
  • Tony Eng, 61, magician, May 4
  • Bill Hargrove, 106, athlete, May 5
  • Irvine Robbins, 90, Baskin-Robbins co-founder, May 5
  • Jerry Wallace, 79, singer, May 5
  • Witold Woyda, 68, Polish fencer, May 5
  • D.C. Minner, 73, blues singer, May 6
  • Joseph Egan, 53, engineer, May 7
  • Eddy Arnold, 89, singer, May 15
  • Murray Jarvik, 84, invented nicotine patch, May 8
  • Leyla Gencer, 80, soprano, May 9
  • Paul King, 72, journalist, May 9
  • Arthur Kroeger, 75, civil servant, May 9
  • Beverlee McKinsey, 72, actress, May 9
  • Nuala O'Faolain, 68, writer, May 9
  • Helen Parsons Shepherd, 85, visual artist, May 9
  • Jessie Jacobs, 17, actress, May 10
  • Paul Haeberlin, 84, chef, May 10
  • Dottie Rambo, 74, gospel singer, May 11
  • John Rutsey, 55, RUSH drummer, May 11
  • Robert Rauschenberg, 82, artist, May 12
  • Irena Sendler, 98, social worker, May 12
  • John Philip Law, 70, actor, May 13
  • Dennis Roberts, 82, university administrator, May 13
  • Noel MacDonald Robertson, 94, basketball player, May 13
  • Alexander Courage, 88, star trek composer, May 15
  • Willis Lamb, 94, physicist, May 15
  • Claude Théberge, 73, visual artist, May 15!
  • Robert Mondavi, 94, vintner, May 16
  • David Mitton, 69, TV director, May 16
  • Jesse Edwards, 96, cardiac pathologist, May 18
  • Shelley Goldberg, 54, jewellery salesman, May 18
  • Lloyd Moore, 95, car racer, May 18
  • Joseph Pevney, 96, Star Trek director, May 18
  • Ernest Chadwick, 87, navy vet WWII, May 19
  • Jack Duffy, 81, singer/actor May 19
  • Huntington Hartford, 97, playboy, May 19
  • Barbara Rockefeller, 91, divorcee, May 19
  • Howard Dill, 73, pumpkin grower, May 20
  • C.W.J. Eliot, 80, president of University of PEI, May 20
  • Zelma Henderson, 88, civil rights activist, May 20
  • Hamilton Jordan, 63, politico, May 20
  • Ron Wallace, 91, Halifax Mayor, May 20
  • Brian Keenan, 66, IRA terrorist, May 21
  • Ted Lanyon, 68, hockey player, May 21
  • Siegmund Nissel, 86, violinist, May 21
  • Len Reilly, 95, politician, May 21
  • Cornell Capa 90, photographer, May 23
  • Tony Humphreys, 69, B.C. functionary, May 23
  • Thelma Keane, 82, inspiration for family circus comic strip, May 23
  • Ken Mew, 92, cleric, May 23
  • Utah Phillips, 73, folk singer, May 23
  • Jimmy McGriff, 72, jazz organist, May 24
  • Earl Eaton, 85, Vail ski resort, May 25
  • Dorothy Fleming, 90, model, May 25
  • Earle Hagen, 88, musician, May 25
  • Alvin Marks, 97, inventor, May 25
  • J.R. Simplot, 99, frozen French Fry king, May 25
  • Ernst Stuhlinger, 94, physicist May 25
  • Rudy Kay, 65, wrestler, May 26
  • Roy Koerner, 75, explorer, May 26
  • Dick Martin, 86, Laugh-In comedian, May 26
  • Sydney Pollack, 71, filmmaker, May 26
  • Kermit Scott, 71, Kermit inspiration, May 26
  • Dianne Odell, 61, polio victim, May 28
  • Mona Campbell, 89, businesswoman, May 29
  • Harvey Korman, 81, actor, May 29
  • Thomas McEntee, 84, Montreal priest, May 29
  • Bob Trevis, 90, groundskeeper, May 29
  • George Finstad, 73, CBC broadcaster, May 30
  • Lorenzo Odone, 30, Lorenzo's Oil inspiration, May 30
  • Boris Shakhlin, 76, Olympic gymnast, May 30
  • Detlef Gromoll, 70, mathematician, May 31
  • Hugh Jarrett, 78, singer, May 31
  • Bob MacGregor, 74, CBC broadcaster, May 31

JUNE

Sheela Basrur, 51

Before SARS made her famous as Toronto's calm, authoritative voice of reason and information, Dr. Basrur had an extensive public health career, including working on rural health projects in India and Nepal. Acutely aware that social factors affect health and well-being, she pushed for restaurant inspections, no-smoking policies, pesticide controls, intervention on childhood obesity, and clear, timely and informative dialogues with the public as the first chief medical officer of health ever appointed by the Ontario Legislature.

Yves Saint Laurent, 71

The Algerian-born Mr. Saint Laurent was only 18 when Christian Dior spotted him at a Parisian design school. Three years later the protégé was head of the House of Dior. As a couturier, Mr. Saint Laurent put women in trousers - tuxedos for evening, white pants and pea jackets for day - and gave them the power to be both themselves and fashionable in clothes that were inspired by art, the animal kingdom and the zeitgeist.

Bo Diddley, 79

Before Elvis, there was Bo Diddley with his signature syncopated beat - three strokes/rest/two strokes, a rollicking rhythm that fans called "bone" music because that's where you felt it. And before Mick Jagger, Mr. Diddley, who was born Otha Ellas Bates, was kicking his heels and leaping and strutting about the stage.

John Templeton, 95

A Yale graduate, a Rhodes Scholar, an audacious investor who made billions in his globally diversified Templeton funds, he was also an open-minded Presbyterian and philanthropist. In business he practised the creed of "buy low, sell high," but he never failed to begin annual meetings of his mutual funds investment company with prayers. What better way to clear the minds of shareholders, he was fond of observing.

James Reaney, 81

The complete creative spirit, Mr. Reaney was a poet, playwright, short-story writer, musician and scholar. The tumultuous history of his "Sowesto" roots were the conduits to his imagination in monumental works including The Donnellys, a theatrical trilogy based on a feud in Tipperary, Ireland, that culminated in the murders of James Donnelly and five members of his family near Lucan, Ont. The story allowed Mr. Reaney to mine ideas about myth, innocence and guilt.

Tim Russert, 58

Felled by a heart attack while recording voiceovers for Meet the Press, the NBC Sunday morning program, Mr. Russert's death shocked the journalistic world into momentary silence. The former NBC News Washington bureau chief, who was the epitome of the hard-working, tough-minded patriotic American, was the author of Big Russ and Me, a memoir of growing up in a working class neighbourhood as the son of a Second World War veteran.

Cyd Charisse, 86

The legs went on forever, and the rest of her wasn't bad either. She danced with Gene Kelly in Singin' in the Rain and with Fred Astaire in The Band Wagon. He called her, "beautiful dynamite."

George Carlin, 71

The Grammy-winning comedian made irreverence funny as he mocked the quotidian absurdities of life, busted the boundaries of good taste and championed free speech in routines such as Seven Words You Can Never Use on Television.

Here is the annotated list of the people who died in 2008 and whose lives were commemorated in obituaries in The Globe and Mail in June.

  • Donnie DeLeskie, 62, steelworker, June 1
  • Bert Houle, 94, won DFC in WWII, June 1
  • Alton Kelley, 67, artist, June 1
  • Yves Saint Laurent, 71, fashion designer, June 1
  • Sheela Basrur, 51, public health doctor, June 2
  • Jerry Daniel, 69, broadcaster, June 2
  • Bo Didley 79, musician, June 2
  • Mel Ferrer, 90, actor/director June 2
  • Ruth Makpii Ipalook, 97, Karluk survivor, June 2
  • Paul Sills, 80, Second-city co-founder, June 2
  • Bill Trimble, 87, pacifist, June 2
  • Jack Carey, 95, naturalist, June 3
  • Jack Lucas, 80, WW II marine, June 3
  • Matthew Bruccoli, 76, literary critic, June 4
  • Jack Lucas, 80, WWII hero, June 5
  • Bobby Anderson, 75, actor, June 6
  • Jimmy Croll, 88, horse trainer, June 6
  • Sherrill Cheda, 72, librarian, June 7
  • Mustafa Khalil, 88, Egyptian Prime Minister, June 7
  • Jim McKay, 86, ABC broadcaster at Munich Olympics, June 7
  • Dino Risi, 91, director, June 7
  • Horst Skoff, 39, tennis player, June 7
  • June Laurent Lamer, 77, ophthalmologist, June 8
  • Franz Russell, 71, actor, June 8
  • Red Shea, 70, Gordon Lightfoot back up singer, June 10
  • John Rauch, 80, athlete, June 10
  • Ove Andersson, 70, Swedish rally driver, June 11
  • Brian Budd, 56, soccer player, June 11
  • Mitch Frerotte, 43, football player, June 11
  • Adam Ledwon, 34, Polish soccer player, June 11
  • James Reaney, 81, poet and dramatist, June 11
  • Ward Boston, 84, lawyer, June 12
  • Stewart Mott, 70, GM heir, June 12
  • Gunther Stent, 84, molecular biologist, June 12
  • Jack Pelech, 74, Chair Canada Games, June 13
  • Tim Russert, 58, Meet the Press broadcaster, June 13
  • Wilf Hamson, 88, lacrosse player, June 14
  • Johnny Buzhardt, 71, baseball pitcher, June 15
  • Arthur Galston, 88, botanist, June 15
  • Ray Getliffe, 94, hockey player, June 15
  • Dennis Murphy, 64, NFB producer, June 15
  • Tony Schwartz, 84, negative ad man, June 15
  • Stan Winston, 63, special effects, June 15
  • John Fox, 80, visual artist, June 16
  • Michael Douglas Meeking, 47, clown, June 16
  • Cyd Charisse, 86, dancer and actress, June 17
  • John Ko Bong, 95, Victoria volunteer, June 17
  • Stanley Biggs, 94, WWII veteran and lawyer, June 17
  • Jean Delannoy, 100, filmmaker, June 18
  • Austin McCarthy, 90, baseball player, June 18
  • Tasha Tudor, 92, illustrator, June 18
  • Michael Ballantyne, 63, NWT politician, June 19
  • Bea Firth, 62, Yukon MLA, June 20
  • Kermit Love, 91, costumer, June 21
  • Ron Simpkins, 66, visual artist, June 21
  • William Vince, 44, film producer, June 21
  • George Carlin, 71, comedian, June 22
  • Dody Goodman, 93, actress, June 22
  • Klaus Grueber, 67, German opera director, June 22
  • Maurice Brown, 95, publisher of Northern Miner, June 24
  • Leonid Hurwicz, 90, Nobel prize economics, June 24
  • Jozef Szajna, 86, playwright, June 24
  • Ernest Edwards, 90, Nova Scotia businessman, June 25
  • Doug Maher, 87, hockey player, June 25
  • Bill Robinson, 86, West Jet exec, June 25
  • Charles Parkhurst, 95, soldier, June 26
  • Marie Castello, 93, U.S. fortune teller, June 27
  • Leonard Pennario, 83, pianist, June 27
  • Michael Turner, 37, graphic artist, June 27
  • Irina Baronova, 89, dancer, June 28
  • William Buchan, 91, son of Cdn. G.G. Lord Tweedsmuir, June 28
  • Nicolae Linca, 79, Olympic boxer, June 28
  • Robert Seamans, 89, NASA engineer, June 28
  • Nancy Tokaryk, 59, field hockey, June 28
  • Don Davis, 65, actor, June 29
  • Diane Hebert, 51, Quebec heart lung transplant patient, June 29
  • Daihachi Oguchi, 84, drum master, June 29
  • Len Butler, 96, geneticist, June 30
  • Arthur Smith, 89, veteran and politician, June 30
  • Angel Tavira, Mexican composer, June 30

JULY

Hamilton Southam, 91

After turning his back on the family newspaper business, he embarked on a diplomatic career in the Pearsonian heyday at External Affairs and later became a visionary cultural figure. The founding general director of the National Arts Centre, inaugural chair of Canada Day celebrations and a force behind the Canadian War Museum, he died peacefully on Canada Day.

Jesse Helms, 86

The right-wing senator from North Carolina and powerful chair of the foreign relations committee was against school integration, voting rights for African-Americans, gay rights, foreign aid, welfare, modern art, abortion, communism and doing business with Fidel Castro - to the dismay of Canadian business interests.

Michael Debakey, 99

As a cardiovascular surgeon, he performed more than 60,000 operations on the famous - Russian president Boris Yeltsin and movie actress Marlene Dietrich - and the unknown and trained scores of doctors, many of whom withered under his scathing criticism. He also invented more than 50 devices and techniques to repair broken heart valves, clogged blood vessels and ruptured arteries beginning, at age 23, with the roller pump, an essential component of the heart-lung machine.

Randy Pausch, 47

A computer scientist, he became famous, and perhaps immortal, when The Last Lecture, a talk he gave about living life to the fullest, was broadcast on the Internet and turned into a bestselling book. "Context is everything," he cheerfully admitted. "If I'd given that lecture, but I weren't dying [of pancreatic cancer]it wouldn't have had the gravitas."

Fenwick Lansdowne, 70

Contracting polio as a baby hobbled his movement, but it probably heightened his sensory perceptions. A self-taught Audubon-style water colourist, he had a precise and capacious visual memory, acute hearing and a sensitivity to movement and colour. Unlike most formal bird art, which often looks frozen, his work conveyed the spirit of the bird.

Here is the annotated list of the people who died in 2008 and whose lives were commemorated in obituaries in The Globe and Mail in July.

  • Len Bramson, 82, WWII veteran and head of The Movie Network, July 1
  • Clay Felker, 82, editor of New York magazine, July 1
  • Joanne McWilliam, 79, priest, July 1
  • Agnes Miller, 86, volunteer, July 1
  • Hamilton Southam, 91, NAC founder and culture maven, July 1
  • Dennis Cocke, 84, B.C. politician, July 2
  • Julius Richmond, 91, pediatrician, July 2
  • William Sanders 82, anthropologist, July 2
  • Larry Harmon, 83, clown, July 3
  • Kathleen Kinkade, 77, hippie and writer, July 3
  • Oliver Schroer, 52, fiddler, July 3
  • Jesse Helms, 86, politician, July 4
  • Evelyn Keyes, 9, actress and Scarlett's sister on GWTW, July 4
  • Simone Ortega, 89, Spanish chef, July 4
  • Lutz Dille, 85, photographer, July 6!
  • Ron Jackson, 74, baseball player, July 6
  • Nonna Mordyukova, 82, Russian actress, July 6
  • Mando Ramos, 59, boxer, July 6
  • Francois Saucier, 47 physicist, July 6
  • Bruce Conner, 74, artist, July 7
  • Dorian Leigh, 91, supermodel, July 7
  • Clem McSpadden, 82, rodeo announcer, July 7
  • Gordon Butterwick, 90, WWII pilot won DFC, July 8
  • John Templeton, 95, mutual fund investment guru, July 8
  • Charles Joffe, 78, Woody Allen's producer, July 9
  • David Rubinoff, 95, businessman, July 9
  • Walter Tilden, 80, rent-a-car maven, July 9
  • Arthur Weinstein, 60, Studio 54 owner, July 9
  • Mike Souchak, 81, golfer, July 10
  • Hayward Carbo, 82, baritone, July 11
  • Michael Debakey, 99, cardiovascular heart surgeon, July 11
  • Archie McCardell, 81, International Harvester CEO, July 11
  • Anatoly Pristavkin, 76, Russian novelist, July 11
  • Rob Guinn, 32, hockey player, July 12
  • Bobby Mercer, 62, baseball player and broadcaster, July 12
  • Terry Murphy, 8, judge, July 12
  • Lefty Schaeffer, 84, baseball player, July 12
  • Tony Snow, 53, White House press secretary, July 12
  • Les Crane, 74, talk show host, July 13
  • Fred Hill, 87, WWII vet and Regina businessman, July 13
  • Dave Ricketts, 73, baseball player and coach, July 13
  • Bob King, 83, nightclub owner, July 14
  • Red Foley, 79, baseball writer and scorer, July 14
  • Breno Mello, 76, actor, July 14!
  • Ross Irwin, 87, WWII veteran, July 15
  • Gyorgy Kolonics, 36, Olympic canoeist, July 15
  • Steve Peterson, 58, NASCAR official, July 15
  • John (Peanuts) O'Flaherty, 90, hockey player, July 16
  • Jo Stafford, 90, singer, July 16
  • Donald Bews, 96, doctor, July 17
  • Dominique Clift, 78, journalist, July 17
  • Larry Haines, 89, actor, July 17
  • Yardley Chittick, 107, patent attorney, July 18
  • Harold Latham, 94, doctor, July 18
  • Hugh MacCallum, 80, literary theorist, July 18
  • Dercy Goncalves, 101, Brazilian comedian, July 19
  • Jerome Holtzman, 82, baseball journalist, July 19
  • Ellen Tallman, 80, Vancouver literati, July 19
  • Dinko Sakic, 87, war criminal, July 20
  • Artie Traum, 65, songwriter, July 20
  • Charles Wick, 90, chief of VOA, July 20
  • Paul Bentley, 87, arrested Lee Harvey Oswald, July 21
  • Sid Craig, 76, co-founder Jenny Craig, July 21
  • Erik Dowling, 92, WWII POW, July 21
  • Barbara Ann Teer, 71, actress, July 21
  • Dick Billes, 79, son of Cdn. Tire founder, July 22
  • Helen Gardiner, 70, ceramics museum founder, July 22
  • Estelle Getty, 84, actress, July 22
  • Victor McKusick, 86, cardiologist, July 22
  • Jamie Cook, 36, baseball player, July 23
  • Frank Schweihs, 78, criminal, July 23
  • Jamie MacGregor, 84, veteran, son of war hero, July 24
  • Joe Beck, jazz guitarist, July 22
  • Harriet Burns, 79, Disney imagineer, July 25
  • Jimmy Chagra, 63, drug dealer, July 25
  • Michael Daly, 83, U.S. Vet WWII, July 25
  • Randy Pausch, 47, computer scientist, July 25ƒo
  • Peter Buckley, 74, CP news editor, July 26
  • Fenwick Lansdowne, 70, bird painter, July 26
  • Youssef Chahine, 82, Egyptian filmmaker, July 27
  • Bob Crampsey, 78, soccer historian, July 27
  • John Russell Gibson, 69, baseball player, July 27
  • Otto Fuerbringer, 97, journalist, July 28
  • Walter Gray, Globe journalist, July 28
  • Johnny Griffin, 80, saxophonist, July 28
  • David Monson, 91, Rabbi and WWII veteran, July 28
  • Mete Parlov, 59, Croatian boxer, July 29
  • Anne Armstrong, U.S. Ambassador to Britain, July 30
  • Vittorio Fiorucci, 75, visual artist, July 30
  • Jim Mitchell, 92, bomber pilot, July 30
  • Porter Vaughan, 89, baseball player, July 30
  • Leif Pettersen, 57, football player, July 31
  • Lee Young, 94, drummer, July 31

AUGUST

Alexander Solzhenitsyn, 89

His literary career began where his military one ended: in prison. As an artillery captain in the Red Army, he groused about the way "the whiskered one," Joseph Stalin, was conducting the war. He was arrested, tortured and sent to a labour camp for seven years and then to internal exile. One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich, his novella about life in "the human meat grinder" was published just as Khrushchev launched his destalinization campaign. The Gulag Archipelago earned Solzhenitsyn the Nobel Prize - and exile. After the collapse of the Soviet Union, he returned, but his disgust with capitalism was out of sync with the new Russia.

Isaac Hayes, 65

An early rapper and disco enthusiast, he not only wrote and sang the theme for the blaxploitation film Shaft, he looked the part with his shaved head, gold chains and sunglasses.

Ted Medland, 80

As head of Wood Gundy, he weathered the 1987 stock-market crash and then co-founded the Ontario Teachers' Pension Plan, still a major investment player.

Killer Kowalski, 81

Despite his sinister moniker and his penchant for eye gouging, twisting his Iron Claw around an opponent's head and leaping from the ropes onto a supine victim, the 6-foot-7, 275-pound hulk was a mild-mannered vegetarian who composed poetry and eschewed tobacco and alcohol.

Here is the annotated list of the people who died in 2008 and whose lives were commemorated in obituaries in The Globe and Mail in August.

  • Paul Hahn, 86, piano store owner, Aug. 1
  • Geoffrey Ballard, 75, fuel cell promoter, Aug. 2
  • Skip Caray, 68, sports broadcaster, Aug. 3
  • Erik Darling, 74, folk singer, Aug. 3
  • August Mohan Raheja, 70, Indian filmmaker, Aug. 3
  • Alexander Solzhenitsyn, 89, writer, Aug. 3
  • Lou Teicher, 83, pianist, Aug. 3
  • Robert Maheu, 90, hired gun, Aug. 4
  • Robert Hazard, 59, songwriter, Aug. 5
  • Ray Mason, journalist, Aug. 5
  • Simon Gray, 71, playwright, Aug. 6
  • Karl Kuehl, 70, Expos manager, Aug. 6
  • Aloysius O'Brien, 93, Nfld. Gaelic speaker, Aug. 6
  • Anthony Russo, 71, Pentagon Papers whistleblower, Aug. 6
  • Reg Whitehouse, 75, football player, Aug. 6
  • Andrea Pininfarina, Italian car mogul, Aug. 7
  • Orville Moody, 74, golfer, Aug. 8
  • Theodore Solotaroff, 79 editor, New American Review, Aug. 8
  • Mahmoud Darwish, 67, Palestinian poet, Aug. 9
  • Bernie Mac, 50, comedian, Aug. 9
  • Larry Pennell, 93, Ont. judge, Aug. 9
  • Jake Tootoosis, 42, aboriginal land claims expert, Aug. 9
  • Wu Shun-Wen, 94, Taiwanese auto maker, Aug. 9
  • Hartwell, Bowsfield, 86, historian, Aug. 10
  • Isaac Hayes, 65, singer, Aug. 10
  • Colin McCullough, 78, journalist, Aug. 10
  • Frantisek Tikal, 75, Czech hockey player, Aug 10
  • George Furth, 75, actor, Aug. 11
  • Don Helms, 81, guitarist, Aug. 11
  • Darren (Bo) Taylor, 42, reformed Crips gang member, Aug. 11
  • Gilles Bilodeau, 53, hockey player, Aug. 12
  • Bruce Rathie, 62, singer/guitarist, Aug. 12
  • Sandy Allen, 53, tallest woman, Aug. 13
  • Jack Weil, 107, promoted cowboy clothing, Aug. 13
  • Frank Ledwell, 78, PEI poet, Aug. 14
  • Charles Whitten, 86, sickle cell expert, Aug. 14
  • Gladys Powers, 109, WWI vet, Aug. 15
  • Jerry Wexler, 91, R&B record producer, Aug. 15
  • Darrin Winston, 42, baseball player, Aug. 15
  • Ronnie Drew, 73, Irish singer, Aug. 16
  • Johnny Moore, 70, trumpeter, Aug. 16
  • Don (Pappy) Snider, 89, DFC winning Cdn. bomber pilot , Aug. 16
  • Dave Freeman, 47, author of 1000 things to do..., Aug. 17
  • Maudie White Hopkins, 93, married Civil War vet, Aug. 17
  • Ted Medland, 80 Wood Gundy executive, Aug. 17
  • Franco Sensi, 82, oil tycoon and soccer club owner, Aug. 17
  • Pervis Jackson, 70, R&B singer, Aug 18
  • LeRoi Moore, 46, saxophonist, Aug. 19
  • Levy Mwanawasa, 59, Zambian politician, Aug. 19
  • Binyamin Gibli, 89, Israeli spymaster, Aug. 20
  • Hua Guofeng, 87, Chinese politician, Aug. 20
  • Gene Upshaw, 63, football player, Aug. 20
  • Fred Crane, 90, actor, Aug. 21
  • Buddy Harman, 79, session musician, Aug. 21
  • Rod Macdonald, 87, WWII veteran, Aug. 21
  • Eldon Rathburn, 92, composer, Aug. 21
  • Wolfgang Voegel, 82, cold War negotiator, Aug. 21
  • Wilf Creighton, 104, survived Halifax explosion, Aug. 22
  • Jim Kearney, 86, journalist, Aug. 22
  • Ralph Young, 90, singer, Aug. 22
  • William Cowan, 89, lawyer and Paul Martin's father-in-law, Aug. 23
  • Yuri Nosenko, 81, double agent, Aug. 23
  • Thomas Weller, 93, Nobel Prize for polio, Aug. 23
  • Jerry Ford, 83, head of modelling agency, Aug. 24
  • Tad Mosel, 86, Pulitzer winning TV and screenwriter, Aug. 24
  • Kevin Duckworth, 44, basketball player, Aug. 25
  • Jabir Herbert Muhammad, 79, Muhammad Ali's mgr, Aug. 25
  • Philomena Gotti, 96, mother of criminal John Gotti, Aug 26
  • Kay Graham, 94, visual artist, Aug. 26
  • Leslie Harris, 78, Pres of Memorial U. in Nfld., Aug. 26!
  • Edip Secovic, 50, boxer, Aug. 26
  • Hazel Warp, 93, stuntwoman, Aug. 26
  • Barbara Warren, 65, triathlete, Aug. 26
  • Del Martin, 87, gay activist, Aug 27
  • Abie Nathan, 81, Israeli peace activist, Aug. 27
  • Olavo Setubal, 85, Brazilian politician and banker, Aug. 27
  • Robin Bell-Irving, 84, gerontologist, Aug. 28
  • Phil Hill, 81, race car driver, Aug. 28
  • Michel Vastel, 68, Quebec journalist, Aug. 28
  • Jacqui Landrum, 64, choreographer, Aug. 29
  • Tommy Bolt, 92, golfer, Aug. 30
  • Killer Kowalski, 81, wrestler, Aug. 30
  • Yuri Nosenko, 81, spy, Aug. 30
  • Ken Campbell, 66, actor, Aug. 31
  • Ike Pappas, 75, journalist, Aug. 31
  • Ross Purse, 89, CNIB exec., Aug. 31
  • Jerry Reed, 71 singer/actor, Aug. 31

SEPTEMBER

Paul Newman, 83

On screen, he played the cad with such grace and sexiness that you almost forgot that falling for him wasn't worth the heartache. Off screen, he played himself - an amateur race-car driver and the devoted husband of Joanne Woodward, living away from the Hollywood glare in Connecticut, and raising millions for charity with his recipe for salad dressing. Private life wasn't all wine and roses - a broken first marriage and an adult son who committed suicide - but his persona and his celebrity melded into a memorable human being.

Thomas Bata, 93

He fled Czechoslovakia ahead of the Nazis, leaving behind the shoe empire he had inherited, but he, and the families he brought with him, built a new one in Canada and made Bata an international synonym for shoes, especially in Africa.

Eph Diamond, 87

A smart boy from a poor immigrant family, he made millions transforming the postwar urban and suburban landscape as a co-founder of Cadillac Fairview, the real estate developer behind the Eaton Centre in Toronto, the Pacific Centre in Vancouver and dozens of other apartment, office and shopping complexes.

Erik Nielsen, 84

Political tough guy and brother of comedian Leslie Nielsen, Yukon Erik, who won the DFC as a pilot in the Second World War, served in the governments of prime ministers John Diefenbaker, Joe Clark and Brian Mulroney.

Richard Monette, 64

As an actor he bared all in Oh! Calcutta and broke boundaries in Michel Tremblay's Hosanna, drawing upon his Québécois accent and his mother's mannerisms to play the troubled transvestite who dresses up as Elizabeth Taylor in Cleopatra. As a director, he earned raves for his production of Taming of The Shrew and gratitude from audiences and actors for re-energizing the Stratford Festival and keeping it afloat during his 14 years as artistic director.

David Foster Wallace, 46

A virtuoso writer with a capacious intellect, he captured the deeply meaningless weirdness of contemporary life in America in essays, short stories and his tour de force novel, Infinite Jest, but he was unable to conquer his own suicidal despair.

Ron Lancaster, 69

Although stumpy in stature, he was a dramatic passer, an evasive runner and such a powerful leader on the field and behind the bench he was called the Little General. He played quarterback for the Rough Riders or the Roughriders, depending on whether he was in Ottawa or Regina, but he won a Grey Cup for both teams and later displayed his Cup-winning ways as a coach with the Edmonton Eskimos and the Hamilton Tiger Cats.

Dora de Pedery Hunt, 94

A Hungarian émigrée, who was befriended by sculptors Frances Loring and Florence Wyle, she galvanized the art of medal making in this country, created symbolic decorations for many of our highest honours and moulded the image of a "mature" sovereign on our coins.

Here is the annotated list of the people who died in 2008 and whose lives were commemorated in obituaries in The Globe and Mail in September.

  • Thomas Bata, 93, shoe magnate, Sept. 1
  • Don Lafontaine, 68, voiceover actor, Sept. 1
  • Todd Cruz, 52, baseball player, Sept. 2
  • Bill Melendez, 91, cartoonist, Sept. 2
  • David Vice, 75, Northern Telecom exec, Sept. 2
  • Michael Hammer, 60, Management guru, Sept. 3
  • Earle Lunsford, 74, football player, Sept. 3
  • Ron Rivera, 60, potter, Sept. 3
  • Eph Diamond, 87, co-founder Cadillac Fairview, Sept 4
  • Dick Enderle, 60, football player, Sept. 4
  • Earl Lunsford, 74, football player, Sept. 4
  • Erik Nielsen, 84, politician, Sept. 4
  • Jean Gordon, 89, Yukon politician, Sept. 5
  • T.J. Norbu, 86, Dalai Lama's brother, Sept. 5
  • Annette Herscovics, 70, Holocaust survivor and scientist, Sept. 6
  • Allan Lawrence, 83, politician, Sept. 6
  • Anita Page, 98, actress, Sept. 6
  • Bill Parnell, 80, runner and track coach, Sept. 6!
  • Larry Shaben, 73, Muslim politician, Sept. 6
  • John Griffin, 85, RCAF pilot, Sept. 7
  • Gregory Mcdonald, 71 crime fiction writer, Sept. 7
  • Tashi Namgyal, 85, Tibetan monk who settled in Victoria, Sept. 7ƒo!
  • Nathan Gordon, 92, U.S. WWII vet and politician, Sept. 8
  • Ralph Plaisted, 80 polar explorer, Sept. 8
  • Evan Tanner, 37, boxer, Sept. 8
  • Eddie Crowder, 77, football coach, Sept. 9
  • Alex Garcia, 74 Islamist leader, Sept. 9
  • Richard Monette, 64, actor and artistic director of Stratford Festival, Sept. 9
  • Gerald Beaudoin, 79, constitutional expert and senator, Sept. 10
  • Vernon Handley, 77, British conductor, Sept. 10
  • Frank Mundus, 82, fisher who inspired Quint in Jaws, Sept. 10
  • Ruedi Rymann, 75, yodeller, Sept. 10
  • Bennett Campbell, 65, PEI Premier, Sept. 11
  • Gerry Gagne, 78, WWII pilot Sept. 11
  • Martin Tytell, 94, typewriter collector, Sept. 11
  • Simon Hantai, 85, artist, Sept. 12
  • David Foster Wallace, 46, writer, Sept. 12
  • James Snow, 79, Ont. politician, Sept. 13
  • Jack Falla, 62, sports academic, Sept. 14
  • Georgi Kitov, 65, archeologist, Sept. 14
  • Jules Loeb, grocer, Sept. 15
  • Richard Wright, 65, Pink Floyd keyboardist, Sept. 15
  • Marion Dewar, 80, Ottawa Mayor, Sept. 15
  • Norman Whitfield, 67, Motown songwriter, Sept. 16
  • James Crumley, 68, crime fiction writer, Sept. 17
  • Jeremiah McKay, 76, First Nations Chief, Sept. 17
  • Humberto Solas, 66, Cuban filmmaker, Sept. 17
  • Mary Flaherty, 92, Finance Minister's mother, Sept. 18
  • Earle Hushagen, 81, curler, Sept. 18
  • Peter Kastner, 64, actor, Sept. 18
  • Ron Lancaster, 69, football legend, Sept. 18
  • Mauricio Kagel, German composer, Sept. 18
  • Henry Steinway, 93, piano maker, Sept. 18
  • Ned Harkness, 89, hockey coach, Sept. 19
  • Earle Palmer, 83, session drummer, Sept. 19
  • Nappy Brown, 78, blues singer, Sept. 20
  • David Haber, 81, arts administrator and impresario, Sept. 21
  • Don Haldane, 93, NFB filmmaker, Sept. 21
  • Pat Thomas, 90, bat boy, Sept. 21
  • Thomas Doerflein, 44, zookeeper, Sept. 22
  • Connie Haines, 87, singer, Sept. 22
  • Dale Auger, 50, Cree visual artist and educator, Sept. 23!
  • Wally Hilgenberg, 66, football player, Sept. 23
  • Joane Humphrey, 71, aka J.J. McColl, CBC producer, Sept. 23
  • Ronald Kornblum 74, L.A. coroner, Sept. 23
  • Irene Dailey, 88, actress, Sept. 24
  • Mickey Vernon, 90, baseball player, Sept. 24
  • Mickey Vernon, 90, first baseman and baseball coach, Sept. 24!
  • Kat Armstrong, 87, dancer, Sept. 25
  • Gordon Dunphy, 74, wood carver, Sept. 25
  • Mike Gurr, 26, drummer, Sept. 25
  • Ken Matthews, 86, Nova Scotia judge, Sept 25
  • Ralph Sazio, 86, Tiger Cats Coach, Sept. 25
  • Vince Bagnato, 76, boxing promoter, Sept. 26
  • Aggie Kukulpwicz, 75, hockey translator, Sept. 26
  • Marian McQuade, 91, founded grandparents day, Sept. 26
  • Paul Newman, 83, actor, Sept. 26
  • George Wydell Jones, 71, singer/songwriter, Sept. 27
  • Jack Faulkner, 82, football executive, Sept. 28
  • Aaron Katz, 92, Rosenberg activist, Sept. 28
  • Dora de Pedery-Hunt, 94, medal sculptor, Sept. 29
  • Stan Kann, 83, vacuum cleaner collector, Sept. 29

OCTOBER

Constance Rooke, 65

Literary critic, anthologist and human-rights activist, she co-founded the Eden Mills Literary Festival with her husband Leon Rooke.

Frankie Kerr, 52

Born to be punk, the front man for Teenage Head changed his name to Venom when the mother of one of his band mates, disturbed by the sounds emanating from her basement, said: "That Frankie is full of venom." And that's the way audiences, who tended to riot after performances, liked him for more than 30 years.

Ben Weider, 85

With his brother Joe, he launched a global bodybuilding and fitness empire that attracted an unknown Austrian muscleman named Arnold Schwarzenegger. Even now, as Governor of California, the former movie star credits his success to the Weider brothers, calling them father figures. Besides muscles, Mr. Weider, who was fascinated by Napoleon, built up an impressive collection of Bonaparte memorabilia, which he donated it to the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts.

Charley Fox, 88

A train-busting Spitfire pilot, he won the DFC and bar for bravery and is credited with strafing German Field Marshal Erwin Rommel's car after the Allied invasion of Normandy in 1944.

Charles Dubin, 87

A highly skilled lawyer who could argue a criminal case one day and a civil one the next, he presided over the federal inquiry into doping in amateur sport after Ben Johnson was stripped of his gold medal at the Seoul Olympics. His recommendations are still in force today.

Studs Terkel, 96

Trained as a lawyer, he worked in radio before finding his métier as an interviewer recording ordinary people's memories of the past. Among Mr. Terkel's books are the Pulitzer Prize-winning, The Good War: An Oral History of World War Two, Hard Times: an Oral History of the Great Depression and Race: How Blacks and Whites Think and Feel About The American Obsession.

Here is the annotated list of the people who died in 2008 and whose lives were commemorated in obituaries in The Globe and Mail in October.

  • Bill Creaghan, 86 New Brunswick judge, Oct. 1
  • Allen Kelly, 105, folklorist, Oct. 1
  • Nick Reynolds, 75, Kingston trio member, Oct. 1
  • Boris Yefimov, 109, journalist, Oct. 1
  • Nancy Sirett, 90, bacteriologist, Oct. 3
  • Al Gallodoro, 95, saxophonist, Oct. 4
  • Servando Gonzalez, 85, Mexican director, Oct. 4
  • Constance Rooke, 65, literary critic and co-founder Eden Mills Literary Festival, Oct. 4
  • Saul Laskin, 90, mayor of Thunder Bay, Oct. 4
  • Ted Briggs, 85, survivor of sinking of HMS Hood, Oct. 4
  • Marial Mosher, 91, anthropologist, Oct. 4
  • Richard Stephen Heyser, 81, U2 pilot, Oct. 6
  • Bruce Dal Canton, 66, baseball player and coach, Oct. 7
  • George Kissell, 88, baseball coach, Oct. 7
  • DeWayne McKinney, 47, wrongly convicted, Oct. 7
  • George Palade, 95, Nobel Prize-winning cell biologist, Oct. 7
  • House Peters, 92, Mr. Clean, Oct. 8
  • Alexei Prokurorov, 44, Russian skier, Oct. 8
  • Lillian Doerksen, 87, missionary, Oct. 9
  • Eva Lester, 85, McGill psychiatrist, Oct. 10
  • Donald Thexton, 86, WWII veteran, Oct. 10
  • William Claxton, 80, photographer, Oct. 11
  • Gordon Earl, 54, Medicine Hat police chief, Oct. 11
  • Kevin Foster, 39, baseball player, Oct. 11
  • Neal Hefti, 85, trumpeter and composer, Oct. 11
  • Guillaume Depardieu, 37, troubled actor son of Gérard Depardieu, Oct. 13
  • Frank Rosenthal, 79, gaming exec, Oct. 13
  • Adrian Sada Trevino, 88, Mexican glassmaker, Oct. 13
  • Robert Furman, 93, engineer/spy, Oct. 14
  • Stanislav Hlucka, 88, Czech pilot, Oct. 14
  • Edie Adams, 81, actress, Oct. 15
  • Frankie Venom, 52, Teenage Head musician, Oct. 15
  • Chris Mims, 38, football player, Oct. 15
  • Jack Narz, 85, game show host, Oct. 15
  • Ed Turney, 79, microchip pioneer, Oct. 15
  • Wang Yung-Ching, 91, Taiwan tycoon, Oct. 15
  • style="list-style: none">LI>Jeanette Heller, 97 Rockette, Oct. 16
  • Hugh McCullum, 76, advocate, Oct. 16
  • Tom Tresh, 71, baseball player, Oct. 16
  • Courtney Gilliatt, 87, Brigadier General, Oct. 17
  • George Keller, 84, Chevron merger, Oct. 17
  • Pete Newell, 93, basketball player and coach, Oct. 17
  • Levi Stubbs, 72, singer Four Tops, Oct. 17
  • Ben Weider, 85, body builder and Napoleon memorabilia collector, Oct. 17
  • Charley Fox, 88, DFC and bar Spitfire pilot, strafed Rommel, Oct. 18
  • Xie Jin, 84, Chinese film director, Oct. 18
  • Evelyn Ay Sempier, 75, Miss America, Oct. 18
  • Dee Dee Warwick, 63, singer and sister of Dionne Warwick, Oct. 18
  • Richard Blackwell, 86, worst dressed list, Oct. 19
  • John Campbell, 67, U.S. timber boss, Oct. 19
  • Marilyn Ferguson, 70, New Age writer, Oct. 19
  • Harold Kant, 77, lawyer, Oct. 19
  • Calvin Kruk, 43, mayor of Dawson Creek, Oct. 19
  • Larry Mangurian, 82, owned Boston Celtics, Oct. 19
  • Rudy Ray Moore, 81, musician, Oct. 19
  • Robert Nett, 86, U.S. war hero, Oct. 19
  • Gianni Raimondi, 85, tenor, Oct. 19
  • Sister Emmanuelle, 99, Belgian nun, Oct. 20
  • Vittorio Foa, 98, Italian politician, Oct. 20
  • Gene Hickerson, 73, football player, Oct. 20
  • Pat Kavanagh, 68, literary agent and wife of Julian Barnes, Oct. 20
  • Rowland Smith, 70, Univ. administrator, Oct. 20
  • Al Pelletier, 86, CEO Mack Trucks, Oct. 21
  • Robert Sprott, 82, musician and broadcaster, Oct. 21
  • Ram Ruhee, 81, IOC exec, Oct. 21
  • Norm Gray, 78, hockey player, Oct. 22
  • Martin Hanson, 81, environmentalist, Oct. 22
  • Sherry Milne, 65, prop queen of Vancouver theatre, Oct. 22
  • Merl Saunders, 74, keyboardist, Oct. 24
  • David Shirriff, 86, scion of jelly and jam family, WWII veteran and plastics manufacturer, Oct. 24
  • Helmut Zilk, 81, Vienna mayor, Oct. 24
  • Gerard Damiano, 80, porn filmmaker, Deep Throat, Oct. 25
  • Frederico Luzzi, 28, tennis player, Oct. 25
  • Muslim Magomayev, 66, Soviet opera singer, Oct. 25
  • Ian McColl, 81, Scottish soccer player, Oct. 25
  • Estelle Reiner, 94, actress in When Harry Met Sally and mother of Ron Reiner, Oct. 25
  • Tony Hillerman, 83, crime novelist, Oct. 26
  • Karl Kassulke, 67, football player, Oct. 26
  • Al Orr, 83, Atlas Steel exec, Oct. 26
  • John J. Veirgin, 87, Doukhobor Honorary Chairman, Oct. 26
  • Ray Ellis, 85, musical arranger Splish Splash, Oct. 27
  • Richard Carr-Gomm, 86, Abbeyfield founder, Oct. 27
  • Charles Dubin, 87, judge, Oct. 27
  • Tom Irvine, 84, navigator and hydrographer in Cdn. Arctic, Oct. 27
  • Es'kia Mphahlele, 88, South African philosopher, Oct. 27
  • Athol Roberts, 86, former president of the Canadian Medical Association, Oct. 27
  • Claire Oderra, 89, Montreal nightclub owner, Oct. 28
  • Blair Maclean, 65, comedian, Oct. 29
  • Bishop Dolegiewicz, 55, Olympic track and field, Oct. 29
  • William Wharton, 82, artist, Oct. 29
  • Frederick Baron, 61, lawyer in John Edwards scandal, Oct. 30
  • John Daly, 71, British producer, Oct. 31
  • Studs Terkel, 96, radio journalist and oral anthologist, Oct. 31

NOVEMBER

Miriam Makeba, 76

The first African woman to win a Grammy award, she had a distinctive style that combined jazz, folk and township rhythms. After starring in an anti-apartheid documentary and calling for an international boycott of South Africa, her passport was revoked and her records, including Pata Pata,The Click Song and Malaika, were banned. More than three decades later, the newly freed Nelson Mandela invited her back to South Africa. Her "haunting melodies gave voice to the pain of exile and dislocation," he said, even as "her music inspired a powerful sense of hope in all of us."

Michael Crichton, 66

The five-times-married, nearly seven-foot-tall polymath "was the greatest at blending science with big theatrical concepts," said director Steven Spielberg, who turned Mr. Crichton's bestseller Jurassic Park into an even more popular film. Mr. Crichton, the author of Congo, Disclosure, Rising Sun, Timeline, State of Fear, Prey, Next and the creator of the long-running TV medical drama ER, trained to become a doctor, but never practised because the novels he wrote to pay his tuition - beginning with The Andromeda Strain - were stellar hits with readers and filmmakers alike.

Clive Barnes, 81

The British-born, Oxford-educated writer was both a dance and a theatre critic in New York - distinction enough in itself - but he was something more: a consummate professional who understood that a critic's role is not merely to damn or praise a performance, but to respond to it openly and thoughtfully.

Here is the annotated list of the people who died in 2008 and whose lives were commemorated in obituaries in The Globe and Mail in November.

  • Jimmy Carl Black, 70, drummer, Mothers of Invention, Nov. 1
  • Oscar Lathlin, 61, Aboriginal cabinet minister in Manitoba, Nov. 1
  • Jacques Piccard, 86, explorer Mariana Trench, Nov. 1
  • Yma Sumac, 86, soprano, Nov. 1
  • William Allister, 89, Japanese POW and visual artist, Nov. 2
  • Jim Koleff, 55, hockey player and coach, Nov. 2
  • Ahmed Al-Mirghani, 67, former president of Sudan, Nov. 2
  • Domenico Leccisi, 88, Italian activist who stole Mussolini's corpse, Nov. 2
  • Terence Tolbert, 44, Obama organizer, Nov. 2
  • Delmar Watson, 82, actor/photographer, Nov. 2
  • Alan Ford, 84, swimmer, Nov. 3
  • Cecil Stoughton, 88, photographer, Nov. 3
  • Lennart Bergelin, 83, Swedish tennis player, Nov. 4
  • Jheryl Busby, 59, CEO Motown Records, Nov. 4
  • Michael Crichton, 66, writer and film maker, Nov. 4
  • B.R. Chopra, 94, Bollywood director, Nov. 5
  • John Leonard, 69, U.S. literary critic, Nov. 5
  • Eleanor Lowe, 107, PEI artist, Nov. 5
  • Norm Marshall, 89, Grey Cup announcer, Nov. 5
  • Ronald Davis, 52, American Medical Association pres., Nov. 6
  • Sir John Hermon, 79, Ulster police chief, Nov. 6
  • Larry James, 61, Olympic relay, Nov. 6
  • Milton Spracklin, 87, Nfld. sail maker, Nov. 6
  • Mieczyslaw Rakowski, 81, Polish prime minister, Nov. 7
  • Jody Reynolds, 75, rockabilly singer, Nov. 7
  • James Strutt, 84, Ottawa modernist architect, Nov. 8
  • Li Ximing, 82, Bejing Party boss during Tiananmen Square, Nov. 8
  • Miriam Makeba, 76, South African singer, Nov. 9
  • Preacher Roe, 92, baseball pitcher, Nov. 9
  • Nikola Kavaja, 76, Yugoslav terrorist, Nov. 10
  • Jack Reader, 82, football referee, Nov. 10
  • Arthur Shawcross, 63, serial killer, Nov. 10
  • Malcolm (Mac) Westcott, 79, academic, Nov. 10
  • Tom Hunt, 85, Hunt Petroleum chair, Nov 11
  • Maria Elena Marques, 83, Mexican actress, Nov. 11
  • Herb Score, 75, pitcher, Nov. 11
  • Laurence Lewin, 64, co-founder of La Senza lingerie chain and cast member of Dragon's Den, Nov. 12
  • Mitch Mitchell, 62, drummer for Jimi Hendrix, Nov. 12
  • George Morrison, 59, hockey player, Nov. 12
  • Irving Gertz, 93, composer for B movies, Nov. 14
  • Adrian Kantrowitz, 90, heart transplant surgeon, Nov. 14
  • Clair Stewart, 98, graphic designer, Nov. 14
  • Syd Thomson, soldier awarded MC, DSO, was hero of Ortona, Nov. 8
  • Roderick Parkhurst, 70, cinematographer, Nov. 12
  • Donald Finkel, 79, U.S. poet, Nov. 15
  • Christel Goltz, 96, Viennese soprano, Nov. 15
  • Grace Hartigan, 86 expressionist painter and teacher, Nov. 15
  • Jan Krugier, 80, art dealer, Nov. 15
  • Louis Ormont, 90, group therapy pioneer, Nov. 15,
  • Wolfgang Schmitz, 85, Austrian banker, Nov. 16
  • Reg Varney, U.K. comedian on sitcom On the Buses, Nov. 16
  • Irving Brecher, 94, comedy writer for Marx Bros., Nov. 17
  • George Morrison, 89, U.S. Admiral and father of Jim Morrison of The Doors, Nov. 17
  • Pete Newell, 93, basketball coach, Nov. 17
  • Robert Walmsley, 80, family court judge, Nov. 17
  • Clive Barnes, 81, dance and theatre critic, Nov. 19
  • Carol Caldwell Graebner, 65, tennis player and former wife of U.S. tennis star, Clark Graebner, Nov. 19
  • Betty James, 90, Slinky toy exec, Nov. 20
  • Jim Mattox, 65 Texas politician, Nov. 20
  • Florence Fancott, 98, Ottawa Little Theatre actress, Nov. 21
  • Eric Breed, 37, aka MC Breed, rap star, Nov. 22
  • Ibrahim Nasir, 82, Maldives prime minister, Nov. 22
  • Richard Hickox, 60, British conductor, Nov. 23,
  • Robert Lucas, 46, singer for Canned Heat, Nov. 23
  • Tom Burgess, 81, baseball player and coach, Nov. 24
  • Amand (Bep) Guidolin, 82, youngest NHL player, Nov. 24
  • Kenny MacLean, 52, guitarist for Platinum Blonde, Nov. 24
  • Ray Perrault, 82, Trudeau-era politician from B.C., Nov. 24
  • Cecil Underwood, 86, governor of West Virginia, Nov. 24
  • William Gibson, 94, playwright, The Miracle Worker and Two for the Seesaw, Nov. 25
  • Edna Parker, 115, teacher and oldest person, Nov. 25
  • Gerald Schoenfeld, Broadway landlord, Nov. 25
  • Edwin Salpeter, 83, astrophysicist, Nov. 26
  • William Landymore, 92, decorated Admiral, opposed to unification, Nov. 27
  • Patricia Marand, 74, actress played Lois Lane in Superman musical, Nov. 27
  • Andrew McKelvey, 74, founded Telephone Marketing Program, Nov. 27
  • Vishwanath Prapp Singh, 77, Indian prime minister, Nov. 27
  • Andy Tomasic, 90, baseball pitcher, Nov. 27
  • German Skurygin, 45, race walker, Nov. 28
  • Arthur Kantrowitz, 95, physicist and engineer, Nov. 29
  • Michael Maniago, 20 hockey player, Nov. 29
  • John Utzon, 90, architect designed Sydney Opera House, Nov. 29
  • Pit Martin, 64, hockey player, Nov. 30
  • Nicholas Montos, 92, criminal, Nov. 30
  • Mirolsav Slama, 91, Czech hockey player, Nov. 30

DECEMBER

Ted Rogers, 75

A sickly child whose father died prematurely of heart disease, Mr. Rogers was a visionary, a scrapper, a micromanager, an aggressive entrepreneur, a patriotic Canadian and a diehard supporter of the Conservative Party. Having cheated death for so long, he embraced business risk, flirted with bankruptcy, and ended up king of the heap in the Canadian communications universe. His company owned a cable television system, radio and TV stations, magazines and a wireless network - and he made convergence work for him by combining media content and transmission in a single corporate entity.

Betty Goodwin, 85

She explored death, loss, mourning and memory in haunting, seemingly evanescent paintings that embedded a narrative punch in your psyche.

Odetta, 77

She sang at the 1963 March on Washington at which Martin Luther King delivered his "I have a dream" speech and was a deep influence on Harry Belafonte, Joan Baez and Bob Dylan.

Sunny Von Bulow, 76

For 28 years the comatose heiress lay oblivious while two attempted-murder trials and estate wrangles swirled about her second husband, Claus von Bulow.

Mark Felt, 95

The FBI official blabbed about Watergate, but Washington Post reporters Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein protected him until Mr. Felt himself finally revealed he was Deep Throat in 2005.

Harold Pinter, 78

A playwright who turned silence into emotional menace, he won the Nobel Prize in 2005 for a definitive and imitated body of work including The Birthday Party, The Caretaker, The Homecoming and Betrayal. An outspoken human-rights advocate, he was savagely critical of the Bush administration.

Eartha Kitt, 81

The sultry cabaret singer and self-described sex kitten was a vocal opponent of the Vietnam War. Her 1953 hit Santa Baby finally went gold this year.

Gordon Fairweather, 85

The New Brunswick lawyer and long-time Progressive Conservative MP left politics in 1977 to become the first chair of the Canadian Human Rights Commission.

Here is the annotated list of the people who died in 2008 and whose lives were commemorated in obituaries in The Globe and Mail in December.

  • Paul Benedict, 70, actor played in The Jeffersons, Dec. 1
  • Betty Goodwin, 85, visual artist, Dec. 1
  • Raymond Lederer, 70, U.S. congressman and felon, Dec. 1
  • Henry Molaison, 82, amnesiac and mechanic, Dec. 2
  • Ted Rogers, 75, communications czar, Dec. 2
  • Forrest Ackerman, 92, founded Famous Monsters of Filmland magazine, Dec. 4
  • Richard Van Allan, 73, U.K. bass-baritone in The Mikado, Dec. 4
  • Alexy II, 79, Russian orthodox patriarch, Dec. 5
  • John (Ben) Boyle, 92, president of TD bank, Dec. 5
  • Nina Foch, 84, actress in An American in Paris, Dec. 5
  • Beverly Garland, 82, played stepmom on My Three Sons, Dec. 5
  • Anjca Parghel, 51, Romanian jazz singer, Dec. 5
  • Dorothea Crittenden, 93, first Cdn. female deputy minister, Dec. 6
  • Larry Devlin, 86, CIA chief, refused to assassinate Congo's Patrice Lumumba, Dec. 6
  • Sunny von Bulow, 76, heiress and suspected murder victim, Dec. 6
  • Kerryn McCann, 41, Commonwealth Games marathoner, Dec. 8
  • Robert Prosky, 77, economist and actor in Mrs. Doubtfire and Dead Man Walking, Dec. 8
  • Hillary Waugh, 88, police procedural novelist, Dec. 8
  • Brent Jensen, 60, Olympic rowing coach, Dec. 9
  • Drazan Jerkovic, 72, Croatian soccer player, Dec. 9
  • Ron Carey, 72, truck drive and pres. of Teamsters Union, Dec. 11
  • Robert Chandler, 80, CBS news exec, 60 Minutes, Dec. 11
  • Bettie Page, 85, pinup queen, Dec. 11
  • Avery Dulles, 90, Presbyterian convert became U.S. Cardinal, Dec. 12
  • Max Elbin, 88, golf pro, Dec. 12
  • Carleton Gajdusek, 85, Nobel Prize for discovering slow viruses in the brain, Dec. 12
  • Van Johnson, 92, actor, The Caine Mutiny, Dec. 12
  • Stephen Roth, 67, cofounder of Alliance Atlantis, Dec. 12
  • Tassos Papadopoulos, 74, Cypriot president, Dec. 12
  • Mike (Mad Dog) Bell, 37, wrestler, Dec. 14
  • Janice Hamblin, 58, sweepstakes winner, Dec. 14
  • William Kaufman, 90, White House adviser, argued against total nuclear war, Dec. 14
  • Carl Kotchian, 94, head of Lockheed Aircraft Corp during bribery scandal, Dec. 14
  • Nick Willhite, 67, baseball pitcher and recovering alcoholic, Dec. 14
  • Rashit Yangirov, 54, Russian cinema historian, Dec. 14
  • Leon Febres Cordero, 77, president of Ecuador, Dec. 15
  • Bill Powell, 89, journalist accused U.S. of using germ warfare in Korea, Dec. 15
  • Sam Bottoms, 53, actor in Apocalypse Now, Dec. 16
  • Joe (King) Krol, 89, Argonaut football player and Grey Cup winner, Dec. 16
  • Sammy Baugh, 94, NFL quarterback and forward passer, Dec. 17
  • Majel Barrett-Roddenberry, 76, actress and widow of Star Trek producer, Dec. 18
  • Mike Blum, 65, football player, announced Dec. 18
  • Mark Felt, 95, Deep Throat, Dec. 18
  • Amanda Roberts Jones, 110, daughter of slave, voted for Obama, Dec. 18
  • Conor Cruise O'Brien, 91, Irish politician and writer, Dec. 18
  • Paul Weyrich, 66, Conservative activist, coined the term "moral majority," Dec. 18
  • James Bevel, 72, Civil Rights leader, convicted of incest, Dec. 19
  • Carol Chomsky, 78, Harvard linguist and wife of Noam Chomsky, Dec. 19
  • Dock Ellis, 63, baseball pitcher and recovering drug and alcohol addict, Dec. 19
  • Olga Lepeshinskaya, 92, Bolshoi ballerina, Dec. 20
  • Robert Mulligan, 83, directed To Kill a Mockingbird, Dec. 20
  • Jim Fulton, 58, NDP MP and head of Suzuki Foundation, Dec. 21
  • Coy Bacon, 66, NFL football player, Dec. 22
  • Eric Wilson, 96, oldest living holder of Victoria Cross, Dec. 23
  • Harold Pinter, 78, Nobel Prize winning playwright, Dec. 24
  • Gordon Fairweather, 85, first head of the Canadian Human Rights Commission, Dec. 25
  • Eartha Kitt, 81, singer and actress, Dec. 25
  • Lark Previn, 35, adopted daughter of Mia Farrow, Dec. 25
  • Ann Savage, B-movie star, Dec. 25
  • Ellie Nesler, 56, vigilante, Dec. 26
  • Delaney Bramlett, 69, singer and songwriter, Let it Rain and Superstar, Dec. 27
  • Freddie Hubbard, 70, jazz trumpeter, Dec. 29
  • Glen How, 89, Jehovah's Witness lawyer won civil rights cases at Supreme Court, Dec. 3
  • Paul Hofmann, 96, German soldier, spy and journalist, Dec. 30
  • Donald Westlake, 75, crime fiction novelist, Dec. 31
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