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From the comments: Next they’ll say ‘there’s nothing illegal about crimes’: Readers react to Paul Manafort’s conviction

Today’s comments were selected from a wide range of topics sparking discussion on the site. The conviction of former Trump campaign chair Paul Manafort is a hopeful sign, argues Sarah Kendzior, though some readers aren’s so sure. Nathan Vanderklippe’s feature on facial recognition technology in China is leaving some feeling uncomfortable, and Canada’s immigration policies are discussed on a Globe editorial.

From Manafort’s conviction a hopeful sign that the rule of law can survive in the Trump era by Sarah Kendzior

Next Republicans will shrug and say there's nothing illegal about crimes. The only way to deal with a political party as corrupt as the GOP, since it can't be jailed, is to remove it from power for a very long time. - Mark Shore

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Thank you Ms. Kendzior. Good to read your views again and be reminded that the entire U.S. government is open to corruption if good people sit around and do nothing. - Dipper1945

"The rule of law" has always been the law of the rich. Justice, what there is of it, has always been justice for the rich with the most expensive lawyer. These grim facts of life have become more glaringly plain to see these last 50 or 70 years as giant corporations have taken over governments everywhere and the entire work farce has submitted to the greed and corruption, the pretensions of "equal justice for all".

"Rule of law" is always justice of the rich, by the rich, for the rich. And the letter of the law for those who can't afford lawyers. - The Work Farce

What else readers are talking about:

From rating your looks to shaming jaywalkers, China’s recognition technology is in your face, by Nathan Vanderklippe

Not the future I want, where the government can monitor everything you do and every interaction you have. What does this mean for privacy and freedom? Can there be any when technology reports all? - RonsterG

This is chilling. - BeeEater

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From Globe editorial: From Trudeau and Scheer, a lesson in how not to treat a far-right protester

Polarization and identity politics is what produced Trump and tribalism. The Globe editorial is spot on. Abandoning the basic democratic idea of civil discourse in favour of demonizing and discrediting the people one disagrees with has produced the present situation. - skyofblue

A recent poll suggests that something is definitely happening in Canada with respect to immigration, and it is entirely possible that the border crossings which is a totally different issue has contributed to the change.

In 2000, 33 per cent of those surveyed said immigration levels should be reduced, and 48 per cent said they should remain the same. In 2018, 49 per cent said they should be reduced and 31 per cent said they should remain the same. Something is obviously happening in this country, and whether we like it or not, there are pro and anti immigrant camps in this country.

There are many things that need addressing in this country in the coming election, and although The Globe hopes that immigration won't be an issue, it's hard to see how it won't.

It's easy to tell a far protestor that she doesn't belong or that she is racist for her anti-immigrant stance. It's quite another thing to run for re-election as the Prime Minister of the country and tell a significant portion of the population that they don't belong or that there are racist because they don't support your party's immigration policies. It's hard to see how there will be unity in the debate, or how opinions are going to soften. - JeffSpooner

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