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A plane lands on the southern runway at London's Heathrow Airport on July 29, 2021.

Steve Parsons/The Associated Press

Grounded

Re Canadian Travellers Excluded As England, Scotland Introduce Exceptions To Quarantine Measures (July 29): If the ArriveCan app is good enough to prove that people are vaccinated on arrival to Canada, why can it not be used as our vaccine passport within Canada and externally?

Mick Casey Collingwood, Ont.

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My wife and I have four grandchildren living in Britain. We have not seen them in almost two years. We are both vaccinated. I am suffering from cancer and want to see them before my condition deteriorates.

What was the reaction of our Deputy Prime Minister to Canada’s exclusion from the easing of some restrictions? She “respects” the decision. Thanks a lot.

Why is she not beating the doors down at the British High Commission to get this changed in the interests of Canadian citizens like us?

Chris Stringer Toronto


Britain doesn’t want Canadians to visit yet, even though we have outstanding vaccination and incidence rates versus the United States and European Union countries.

That’s fine. I will cancel my trip to London next spring and travel in Canada.

All Canadians should avoid Britain.

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David Chalmers Toronto

Money for nothing?

Re Green Party’s Legal Woes Weigh On Finances (July 29): I voted Green at the last election. Fed up with left-versus-right politics, I thought I had found a party with a “pure” cause: a focus on the environment and plans to deal with climate change.

I sent a modest donation. I suspect many fellow Green supporters are disappointed with the bickering within the party, over issues that have absolutely nothing to do with the environment.

Then the final straw: wasting $200,000 of party funds on lawyers’ fees. What a disappointing shambles.

Robert Harrison Burlington, Ont.

Sign of the time

Re We Must Look Past Symbolism When Deciding Which Jobs Should Be Bilingual (July 28): Please add my name to the list of people who believe that, while Mary Simon does not speak French, she will have a staff that does. At this point in our nation’s history, an Indigenous voice and Indigenous languages need to be heard.

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In 2021, Canada is bigger than French and English. We should be bigger than those strict lines of acceptability.

I say let’s hear Ms. Simon’s voice, language and perspective. Maybe we will learn something – and maybe she will learn some French.

Susan McKane London, Ont.


I find the criticism aimed toward Mary Simon to be quite petty. She has many attributes and much experience to fulfill her duties.

There are millions of Canadians who are not bilingual in any second language, let alone French. They seem to get along just fine, even when visiting Quebec or another country. With a promise to continue French studies, I believe Ms. Simon is proving herself far more worthy than her critics.

Ouvre tes yeux et vois le bien.

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Ernie Ilson Mississauga

Reconciliation and revitalization

Re A Small Act Of Reconciliation (Opinion, July 24): The reintroduction of 21 bison to Poundmaker Cree Nation in Saskatchewan is good news. Before we started farming the western plains with synthetic fertilizers and pesticides, the Prairies had eight feet of topsoil. By the Dirty Thirties, it had been turned to sand.

This “small act of reconciliation” is a big idea. Hopefully it is the beginning of efforts to restore health to the soil all across Canada in ways that suit each part. We can never have reconciliation unless we do.

Margaret Tyson Ottawa

Speed check

Re Is It Fair For Cyclists To Receive Speeding Tickets If They Don’t Have Speedometers (Online, July 26): It appears that bicycle riders consider themselves exempt from laws and regulations. Those interested in this phenomenon should take some time to observe riders on one-way streets and at intersections with stop signs.

With or without instruments, moving bicycles are a potential danger to pedestrians. If a rider is on a public roadway, they should be responsible for knowing such things as their speed.

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Riders should buy and install their own bicycle speedometers.

Thomas Kane Vancouver

A quiet place

Re Those Obnoxious Kings Of The Road (July 24): I have been a truck owner for over 50 years as a necessity to my small business. My current F-150 is eight years old and quiet. A major polluting factor of new pickup trucks is noise.

The operative word in truck marketing is “tough.” It means aggressive. And aggressive means loud. Millions are spent by manufacturers on creating just the right growl to up the ante year after year. Diesels are the worst.

The major auto dealers in any city are citizens as well, often leaders in smaller communities such as mine. These are the people who can have a voice in stopping all this. If they have any influence on the nature of the vehicles they sell, and want to help make their communities better, it should be to rein in truck designers and their “I’m tougher than you” attitude.

How about: Ah, the new F150 – it’s quieter.

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Douglas Bentham Saskatoon


When the good people of London noticed too many four-wheel-drive Range Rovers registered in their city, that vehicle became affectionately known as a “Chelsea tractor.”

Image problem solved.

Christopher Cottier West Vancouver

Which way?

Re The Search For Toronto’s Below-average Priced Homes (Real Estate, July 30): The house on Coxwell Avenue, not far from Ashbridges Bay, was described as being located near “the soon-to-be completed Eglinton LRT,” which lies several kilometres north. What happened to the standard selling point of “steps to the beach?”

Louise Philippe Toronto

Got game

Re Are the Tokyo Games Already A Failure? (Sports, July 28): I encourage everyone to still tune in to as many Olympic events possible. What better way to learn about the host country.

Watching cyclists weave through Japanese mountains and countryside gives me a front-row seat from my living room comparable to the best tour guide. Fantastic aerial and streetside views show parts of Japan I didn’t know existed.

I also enjoy watching sports I would never normally sit and watch. Water polo, beach volleyball, every track and field event, swimming, fencing – there’s something for everyone.

After the past year this world has been through, what better way to “get away from it all” and immerse ourselves in something joyful.

Go Canada go!

Colleen Childs Mississauga


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