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U.S. President Donald Trump as he departs on campaign travel to Minnesota from the South Lawn at the White House in Washington, Sept. 30, 2020.

CARLOS BARRIA/Reuters

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Trumped up

Re Trump Receives Treatment At Hospital (Oct. 3): Whatever feelings one has for Donald Trump the victim, his carelessness toward his staffers, supporters and donors – that is to say, his having acted as a vector for COVID-19 – is something for which he should face consequences. Ditto the failure of the White House to alert the Biden campaign the moment the Trumps’ positive tests rolled in.

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The President may yet be able to huff and puff his way through COVID-19 the way he has through absolutely everything else, but he may yet find that the coronavirus is a worthy match for him, given his advanced age and portliness. This pestilence in the White House should produce a debate on age limits for the presidency, because the 21st century is shaping up to be a doozy.

Ron Charach Toronto`

This development puts a new spin on the old adage, “When America sneezes, the world catches a cold."

Steve Feiner London, Ont.

Brian Gable’s editorial cartoon featuring Edward Gibbon’s The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire (Oct. 1) captures something I have been musing about. Are we witnessing the fall of another empire? If so, what does that make Canada?

Will we be, like the Franks, Venetians and Britons, a nearby people who emerge with a renaissance after a dark age? Or will the chaos engulf us?

I hope someone in Ottawa is thinking about these scenarios. We can’t change the channel even if we have the remote in hand.

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Katherine Peel Toronto

Re Donald Trump Is A Trump Supremacist (Opinion, Oct. 3): How many people are aware that the founder of the Proud Boys is from Canada? I believe this knowledge will shock some Canadians into checking their biases, conscious and unconscious.

For example, the death of Joyce Echaquan in a Quebec hospital is a sign to me that Canada has widespread issues of racism and white supremacy – just waiting for the right leader to bring them up to the surface.

Before we look down on Donald Trump’s reluctance to denounce white supremacy, we should look at ourselves. Ms. Echaquan’s death demands that we do.

Paulina Banda Edmundston, N.B.

Re Tuesday’s Gross Debate Proves Trump Is No Longer A Master Of TV (Oct. 1): At the next debate, I hope to see Joe Biden pull out an envelope from his coat pocket and quietly scatter 15 crisp US$50 bills on the floor in front of Donald Trump, while saying, “Mr. President, these may come in handy when you file your 2020 federal income tax return."

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Ken Mark Toronto

“How many seconds will we – will you leave me before you jump in? … Ten seconds.” This was Yves-François Blanchet responding to Maxime Bernier at the English leaders debate during the last Canadian election campaign. In a tactic practised by bullies everywhere and used to silence debate, Mr. Bernier constantly interrupted his opponents. This particular debate was a disgrace, with just about everyone losing their temper, speaking out of turn and resorting to insults.

No one was surprised by Donald Trump’s antics during the U.S. presidential debate. But it was disappointing that Democrats didn’t come up with smarter strategies to keep Joe Biden from losing his cool. That was all he needed to do.

Linda Leon Whitehorse

Culture change

Re Landmark With Racist Moniker Renamed By Indigenous Elders (Oct. 1): Place names are so much more than geographical indicators. They carry with them all sorts of associations and connotations that reflect history, ideology and politics.

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Over time, place names can become so familiar that people become desensitized to its underlying meaning. They become part of the regular language, and derogatory place names can become the norm. Words can hurt, and in this case, nearby First Nations communities were constantly reminded of the mistreatment of Indigenous women.

For the Stoney Nakoda Nation, restoring a traditional name recognizes and celebrates their history on the land. Their choice of words directly counters the previously misogynistic and racist name. The importance of renaming this landmark is more than just symbolic.

Words matter.

Natasha Godard St. Eustache, Man.

Foreign affairs

Re Jason Kenney Shouts Into The Wind (Oct. 2): Delhi’s government may have declared that 25 per cent of newly registered vehicles in its jurisdiction will be electrically powered by 2024. However, India is the world’s third-largest producer and consumer of electricity – and approximately 75 per cent of it is generated using fossil fuels, mostly coal.

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Hardly the description of a green revolution.

Mitch Lavoie Edmonton

Re A Delicate Balance (Opinion, Sept. 26): While acknowledging the powerful message in contributor Wade Davis’s examination of Colombia, I cannot let it pass without noting the cavalier way in which he discusses the demand side of the market for cocaine.

Most consumers of cocaine are not practicing “casual consumption” in bars and boardrooms. The scourge of addiction plays a large role in such consumption. The millions of people around the world who become addicted to the drug deserve as much help as Colombians do. While legalization (hardly “cleansing”) may be one possible way in which governments can help stop the illicit market, that would only be a beginning if there is not an accompanying commitment to education, prevention and treatment.

Let’s commit to helping people on both the demand and supply side of this horrible market.

Nichola Hall Vancouver

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On the road

Re Geared Up (Letters, Sept. 30): Pedestrians should also pay attention!

Years ago, my adult son suffered two broken elbows because a jogger didn’t look before crossing in front of him. When she finally noticed him, as he steered around her, she changed direction again. My son braked to avoid her and ended up going over his handlebars.

My neighbour also had a serious accident when a dog, off leash, ran in front of her.

My friend’s husband shattered his pelvis when a dog owner’s extendable leash caused him to crash.

I have no doubt that these pedestrians had no idea the extent of the injuries and costs caused by their careless actions.

Jan Vanderwal Toronto

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