Skip to main content

Kawhi Leonard, who led the Toronto Raptors to an NBA championship, has decided to join the Los Angeles Clippers in his home state.

Vaughn Ridley/Getty Images

Letters to the Editor should be exclusive to The Globe and Mail. Include your name, address and daytime phone number. Try to keep letters to fewer than 150 words. Letters may be edited for length and clarity. To submit a letter by e-mail, click here: letters@globeandmail.com

..................................................................................................................................

After Kawhi

Kawhi Leonard broke my heart (Kawhi’s Golden Silence: How Leonard Got His Deal Without Making Enemies, July 8).

Story continues below advertisement

Sure, victory on the court was sweet. But it’s what happened off the court that was even sweeter. Mr. Leonard brought the whole nation together – people of all ages, religions, political affiliations, cultures, ethnicities, languages and so on. We were all focusing on the same screen. Happy. Peaceful. All rooting for Mr. Leonard and the Toronto Raptors.

Mr. Leonard did what no other political leader has succeeded in doing: He united us. At a time like this when politicians seem intent on making us believe that there is more hate than love in this world, we needed a magic wand like Mr. Leonard.

Nalini Parikh, Victoria

............................................

I am not sure if Mr. Leonard has demonstrated he is a brilliant strategist or he is just quiet and reserved by nature.

But he has helped to demonstrate how professional sports, like no other form of entertainment, is able to captivate and move masses of people to invest significant time, emotion and money toward the pursuit of sports titles. It puzzles me that fans (both long-term and recent converts) place such importance on outcomes that do nothing, except for short-term joy or anguish, to change their lives or the state of their communities. Are we to value our towns, cities, provinces and country based on the number of championships or medals we win?

A recent poll suggested most Canadians wouldn’t invest about $100 annually to help fight climate change. Yet we have witnessed far greater individual investment in the pursuit of professional sports titles. If only we could get people this enthused to invest in far more worthy recipients – matters that really do change lives. Combating climate change is one. Child abuse, racism, sexism, bullying and poverty are others. Fans, take your pick.

Story continues below advertisement

Mark Roberts, Gananoque, Ont.

............................................

There was a time when professional athletes built a relationship with the fan base in the market for which they played. The departure of Mr. Leonard, after playing just one season for the Raptors, sadly demonstrates that the fans don’t really matter.

After a massive victory parade just three weeks ago, largely in Mr. Leonard’s honour, Toronto fans have now had their euphoria – and hopes for the next season – completely deflated. It’s a lesson for us all.

James Phillips, Toronto

............................................

Story continues below advertisement

Now that Mr. Leonard has decided to leave Toronto, joined by Danny Green, let’s turn our attention to Kyle Lowry and the other Raptors who deserve credit for their considerable contributions to the team’s success.

Toronto and the country can be proud of the whole team, not just one or two players.

Barbara Horvath, Caledon, Ont.

Our Arctic authority

The Arctic is warming at a much faster rate than the rest of Canada (Northern Exposure: As The Sea Ice Melts, Paranoia Grows, July 6).

Our sovereignty of the Arctic is being threatened as sea ice is disappearing and the Northwest Passage is becoming open for possibly even year-round shipping. We have to ensure that the Northwest Passage is not declared international waters.

As Canada’s internal waters, the Northwest Passage would still be available for international shipping, but with our control. If we lose control, there will be dire consequences for the Arctic environment, resource extraction, and security. To protect our sovereignty, we need astute diplomacy backed by a stronger military presence and a beefed-up Coast Guard in the Arctic.

Story continues below advertisement

Reiner Jaakson, Oakville, Ont.

Lessons from Norway

Alberta Premier Jason Kenney wants to spend $2.5-million to investigate the funding of environmental groups opposing pipelines (Alberta To Probe Environmental Groups, July 4).

I suggest the return on investment may be higher were he to spend that sum on studying the sovereign wealth fund of Norway. As in Alberta, the fund is based on oil and gas revenue. Norway has invested the windfall wisely, with returns exceeding those earned by the Alberta version. And unlike Alberta, Norway has taken steps to diversify its economy away from resource development and investments.

I fear that Mr. Kenney wants Alberta to cling to a sector whose future is less than stellar.

Steven Diener, Toronto

Misguided entitlements

Re Sports Minister Apologizes To Senators Owner (July 6):

Story continues below advertisement

The most offensive part of Ontario cabinet minister Lisa MacLeod’s words is not the foul language but the statements preceding the foul language – “Do you know who I am?” and “I’m your minister.” The words “your minister” seem to convey that Ms. MacLeod has no understanding of her ministerial role. She was elected by riding members as their representative. That does not make her anybody’s minister. It simply puts her into a position to serve citizens by helping to form and implement public policy. The ministerial title only gives her power within the legislature. Outside there, her role is to help citizens and groups who seek her help.

Her statements also imply that being a minister gives her special entitlements, especially when attached to, “Do you know who I am?” The problem here is not the foul language used but the perceived special entitlements.

Ants Evard, Toronto

Free-market football

The U.S. victory at the FIFA Women’s World Cup has stirred up the debate regarding compensation of men versus women in the same sport (Cup Win Raises Issues Of Pay Equity, Again, July 8).

You don’t have to look far to see similar discrepancies in other professional sports, including golf and basketball. There is a valid reason; these are revenue-generating businesses. The bigger the audience, the larger the revenue, the more prize money to spread around. Build a larger base and the revenue will follow.

Mark Spurr, Toronto

Story continues below advertisement

............................................

Will female footballers ever make as much as their male counterparts? Probably not. Not until enough fans can be persuaded to pony up enough money to make it happen.

You’d think that people living in the world’s largest free-market economy would know that.

Richard Seymour, Brechin, Ont.

Ivanka for Veep?

Re The Royal White House: King Donald Grooms Ivanka As His Successor (July 3):

U.S. President Donald Trump is not grooming Ivanka for a royal succession, but rather to be his running mate in 2020. Does anyone in the Republican Party have the backbone to say otherwise?

Terry Downey, Calgary

Keep your Opinions sharp and informed. Get the Opinion newsletter. Sign up today.

Report an error
Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

Comments that violate our community guidelines will be removed.

Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

Cannabis pro newsletter