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Letters to the Editor June 12: Booing Kevin Durant? Not nice, Canada. Plus other letters to the editor

Golden State Warriors forward Kevin Durant (35) after an injury during the second quarter in Game 5 against the Toronto Raptors.

Kyle Terada/USA TODAY Sports via Reuters

Letters to the Editor should be exclusive to The Globe and Mail. Include your name, address and daytime phone number. Try to keep letters to fewer than 150 words. Letters may be edited for length and clarity. To submit a letter by e-mail, click here: letters@globeandmail.com

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Booing Kevin Durant? Not nice, Canada

Re History In The Making (June 11): Although I’ve lived in the United States since 1976, I have always been proud of Canada’s reputation for good sportsmanship.

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The appalling behaviour of Toronto Raptors fans Monday night did much to undermine it. In initially cheering the injury to Kevin Durant, one of the most beautiful players the game has ever seen, Toronto fans demonstrated a classlessness usually only seen in the worst of American sports.

They very much damaged Toronto’s and the country’s reputation in the process.

Adam Mitchell, Telluride, Colo.

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With Warriors injuries piling up in this championship series, it became clear that these finals were going to be a grind, and that “Dub Nation” might not be able to outlast a tough and worthy Raptors team with an entire nation pulling for them.

I was actually okay with that.

After all, the Warriors have had an amazing run these past few years, and I can’t think of a nicer city to lose to than Toronto.

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Those thoughts evaporated in an instant, however, as I watched in disbelief as rapturous Raptors fans leapt to their feet, cheering and waving their hands, shouting “bye bye” only feet away from Kevin Durant as he lay on the court, grabbing his ankle in what was clearly a serious injury.

Caroline Sanders, San Francisco

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If the NBA had any sense of decency, it could send a loud message – one that I am sure the sports world would support – by taking Game 7 away from these boorish Raptors fans, and instead playing it in front of classier fans in Oakland. Kids, who learn by watching us grownups, might remember such a lesson.

What makes this worse for me personally is that I come from Canada and have to explain such shocking behaviour to friends and colleagues here in the United States, who thought folks from Canada were so nice. They are talking about this here and are appalled at what they saw.

Great publicity for Canada!

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Steven Winnett, Attleboro, Me.

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I am a huge fan of all things Canadian. I love your beautiful country and am fortunate to have many Canadian friends. The innate kindness and courtesy of your citizenry is legendary.

And that’s why the behaviour of Raptors fans at the game Monday night was surprising and disappointing. I know you are better than this.

Jane Wiley, Columbia, S.C.

Now, that was nice

Re A Hard-Won Victory (June 11): I admire and respect elite athleticism, be it demonstrated in basketball, hockey, golf or any other sport.

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A perusal of the Sports Section usually highlights the achievements of men in sports. Kudos to The Globe and Mail for the placement on the front page of Canada’s women’s team at the FIFA Women’s World Cup on a day when another recent sporting event is likely the first topic of conversation.

Trish Crowe, Kingston

‘Peoples’ rule’

Re TV’s Sutherland Says Ford Is ‘No Tommy Douglas’ (June 11): So Ontario’s Progressive Conservatives are “for the people” – Tommy Douglas style, no less.

Despite cabinet minister Lisa MacLeod’s subsequent sad attempt to distract from Kiefer Sutherland’s tribute to his grandfather, Ontarians – even Ms. MacLeod’s “base” – won’t confuse Doug Ford with T.C. (Tommy) Douglas.

At a big Toronto CCF rally in 1947, which was reported in The Globe and Mail, the then-Saskatchewan Premier acknowledged that his government’s budget was greater than his predecessor’s (Douglas Sees Possible Ontario ‘Peoples’ Rule – May 2, 1947). To laughter and applause, Douglas quipped, “It takes more money to run a boat that is going some place than one that is tied to the dock.”

Or going backward, as it is now in Ontario.

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Shea Hoffmitz, Hamilton

Censored by Facebook

Re Facebook Launches Searchable Database, Identity Verification For Political Ads Ahead Of Federal Election (June 10): Facebook can’t figure out what is political. Peace Magazine holds a weekly discussion with experts about a global issue. We pay to post them on our Facebook page and website, and send them worldwide to an audience that varies between 20,000 and 90,000 people, depending on the topic. These hour-long videos are as informative as my former University of Toronto lectures, but now Facebook rejects many, saying they violate “community standards.”

They rejected these shocking topics: Nuclear Disarmament, How to Plant a Forest, How Gandhians Aid the Poor, Report on COP 24 Meeting in Poland, Improving Peacekeeping, What Building Materials are Most Sustainable? and Can Drones Plant a Billion Trees?

At first, if I’d reapply, omitting the U.S. from the target audience would usually be enough to let it pass, but not lately – even to a Canadian audience.

Metta Spencer, editor, Peace Magazine; Toronto

Plastic responsibility

Re Put Down That Plastic Fork, Canada (editorial, June 11): You write that “Extended producer responsibility involves making large food retailers and consumer packaged-goods companies entirely responsible for the cost of recycling. Doing so takes a load off of taxpayers.”

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Costs are a pass-through item. By all means, make “large food retailers and consumer packaged-goods companies entirely responsible for the cost of recycling” – but they will simply pass on that cost to their customers, who may, or may not, be taxpayers.

Richard Seymour, Brechin, Ont.

Canuck ingenuity

The Canadian landing craft, LCI(L) 252, shown in Monday’s Moment In Time photograph, was transporting members of the Cameron Highlanders of Ottawa to Juno Beach (Canadian Troops Landing On D-Day).

My father, Lieutenant R.E.S. Wakefield, was the commanding officer of the ship. Although reticent about the truly grim events of D-Day, he told of the remarkable co-operation, perseverance and ingenuity of his crew members in the face of adversity.

Not long after the photo you published was taken, the ship would strike a submerged mine while running up on the beach for the landing. Although the troops were able to disembark, a hole had been blown through the double bottom of the ship, and one of its two engines was incapacitated.

Kit bags were stuffed into the hole and, at low tide, teams of sailors dug around and under the ship to free it from the sand.

An especially high spring tide gradually lifted the craft out of the sand, and the crew were able to start the remaining engine. Free of the beach, they limped back across the channel to Portsmouth in reverse.

Jennifer Wakefield, London, Ont.

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