Skip to main content
Complete Olympic Games coverage at your fingertips
Your inside track on the Olympic Games
Enjoy unlimited digital access
$1.99
per week for 24 weeks
Complete Olympic Games coverage at your fingertips
Your inside track onthe Olympics Games
$1.99
per week
for 24 weeks
// //

A U.S. Customs and Protection vehicle stands beside a sign reading that the border is closed to non-essential traffic at the Canada-U.S. border crossing at the Thousand Islands Bridge in Lansdowne, Ont., Sept. 28, 2020.

LARS HAGBERG/Reuters

Keep your Opinions sharp and informed. Get the Opinion newsletter. Sign up today.

Checking in

Re The Goalies Take The Spotlight As Habs, Golden Knights Head To Montreal (Sports, June 18): As a Canadian citizen living in Washington State who, due to border restrictions and impractical compassionate-entry requirements, was unable to visit with my mother prior to her death in Montreal on May 22, I am disgusted by the decision to approve travel exemptions for hockey players competing in the Stanley Cup playoffs.

If ever there was a good reason for a travel exemption, surely the impending, lonely death of a family member should be near the top of the list – dare I say, at least a rung or two above the all-important need for hockey players to chase a puck around. Apparently not.

Story continues below advertisement

Christine Mullie Winthrop, Wash.


Re Sunny Day, COVID Cloud Going Away (Editorial, June 16): This “happy turn” after a period of darkness is in part due to the accumulated efforts of thousands of largely unnoted and unsung workers. To correct this ignorance, I would like to offer public congratulations to the organizers and workers at Durham Region Public Health.

I’ve experienced their efforts at two clinics. Both were well-organized and the process flowed without hitches or delays. Especially notable was that, without exception, all the workers were polite and well-prepared. They were also clearly comforting to people who might have been worried about vaccine side effects. Their attitude and efficiency created a positive and hopeful experience.

When the next pandemic stories are written, I hope we can remember people like the workers in Durham.

Martin Birt Uxbridge, Ont.

Olympic efforts

Re Japan To Ease Restrictions In Nine Prefectures (Sports, June 18): Japan has barely vaccinated any of its population, but still intends to go ahead with the Olympics. It seems like a recipe for disaster.

Any country that decides to take part should do what it can to help. Athletes, coaches and other team members should be vaccinated. Members of the public travelling to Japan should be vaccinated. If vaccine supplies are a problem, participating countries should consider sending vaccines to Japan.

Story continues below advertisement

I’ve always enjoyed the Olympics. It would be terrible if the event was seen to have a major responsibility in the creation of a national disaster in Japan.

Keith Conover Mississauga

Why?

Re Trial Begins For Officer Who Held Black Man By Neck (June 18): Why were police called rather than a TTC supervisor? Perhaps if they had been called, it could’ve been verified if the passenger had paid his fare, and this terrible altercation would never have occurred.

Shirley Arnold Toronto


Why did the bus driver react the way he did? I am quite certain that having “smelled of cigarettes” does not in itself constitute a clear and present danger. This seems to be a scenario that was entirely avoidable, unless there is an underlying, unspoken issue as to why people of colour should be concerned about using public transit in the city.

Mark Spurr Toronto

Story continues below advertisement

Slow down

Re Speed Kills: Slowing Cars Is Great For Cities (Editorial, June 12): Yes, slowing cars in cities is required, but only through better enforcement would lower speed limits be effective.

Our stretched and expensive police forces cannot readily increase enforcement. We should implement more automated speed cameras. These can pay for themselves and generate funds for other pedestrian and cyclist safety measures.

Many politicians, like Ottawa Mayor Jim Watson, are afraid such cameras will be seen by motorists as a “cash grab.” This perspective seems to value speeding motorists more than vulnerable pedestrians and cyclists. While there is some willingness to install permanent speed cameras in a few selected school zones, this is a modest initiative.

Drivers should be respecting speed limits everywhere and be fined if they do not.

John Dance Ottawa

Economic position

Re Inflation Jitters Will Turn Into Deflation Fear By End Of Year: Rosenberg (Report on Business, June 14): A noted U.S. investor recently explained several of the dangers in the current stance of the U.S. Federal Reserve. The scary aspect is that the people making these decisions are mostly protected from the negative results if they are bad for the general population.

Story continues below advertisement

Many consumers are experiencing noticeable price increases. The Canadian government seems to be pouring oil on the fire by playing Santa Claus with our tax dollars for certain sections of the population that they deem warrant this expenditure. The extra dollars likely won’t be enough to compensate for the inflationary aspects they are creating.

The Liberals have proven to me in the past that they are poor economists.

Anne Robinson Toronto

Travel woes

Re Ottawa Favours Air Canada Over Consumers: Critic (Report on Business, June 18): I booked a flight on Air Canada to Peru in February, 2020. It was cancelled. I am now told it will take at least six months to get a refund.

How is it possible that it takes six months to get a refund, but Air Canada was able to approve executive bonuses in a few hours?

Richard Howard Toronto

Story continues below advertisement


Re Where Are The Canadians? (Opinion, June 12): A similar question could surely be asked regarding cross-border Americans in Canada.

Americans have been here for centuries. Political dissidents from the new republic flowed northward into what is now Quebec’s Eastern Townships in the 1820s and 1830s. They divided this area into “townships,” based on the New England model. Beginning in the late 19th century, U.S. tourists along the Eastern Seaboard and further south began making the region a holiday destination.

Fresh air and scenery were of course attractions. But as noted to me by my brother, a public-health specialist at Johns Hopkins University, as recently as the early 20th century, malaria was still a threat in the summertime heat of Baltimore and other regions of the near-South. Fresh air was more than just a leisure pursuit.

During this pandemic, many cottages and residences here have remained empty, but now will progressively fill up again, it seems. Welcome back!

David Winch North Hatley, Que.

Fun of it

Re Somebody Paid US$28-million To Spend Time In Space With Amazon’s Bezos (Online, June 13): Meanwhile, a U.S. lobster diver rode briefly – he estimates for 30 seconds – in the mouth of a humpback whale (A Whale Of A Tale: U.S. Lobster Diver Caught In Humpback’s Mouth, Spit Out – June 13). The ride cost him nothing, and he got to keep all the plastic waste in the whale’s mouth.

Story continues below advertisement

T.M. Dickey Toronto


Letters to the Editor should be exclusive to The Globe and Mail. Include your name, address and daytime phone number. Try to keep letters to fewer than 150 words. Letters may be edited for length and clarity. To submit a letter by e-mail, click here: letters@globeandmail.com

Report an error
Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

If you do not see your comment posted immediately, it is being reviewed by the moderation team and may appear shortly, generally within an hour.

We aim to have all comments reviewed in a timely manner.

Comments that violate our community guidelines will not be posted.

UPDATED: Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

To view this site properly, enable cookies in your browser. Read our privacy policy to learn more.
How to enable cookies