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Leader of the Opposition Andrew Scheer gestures to MP Leona Alleslev to deliver a statement to the media after announcing she would cross the floor from the Liberal Party to the Conservatives in Ottawa on Monday Sept.17, 2018.Adrian Wyld/The Canadian Press

Letters to the Editor should be exclusive to The Globe and Mail. Include your name, address and daytime phone number. Try to keep letters to fewer than 150 words. Letters may be edited for length and clarity. To submit a letter by e-mail, click here: letters@globeandmail.com

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Feeling disrespected

Re Liberal MP Alleslev Crosses The Floor To Tories As Parliament Returns (Sept. 18): Jumping party fences involves betraying the trust of the people who have elected the politician.

I wish politicians would show some respect to those who trust them, and expect them to live by their commitments. If they want to cross the floor, it is their choice but they should at least wait until their term ends and then choose the banner they want to run under in the next election.

Abubakar N. Kasim, Toronto

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It’s an old-fashioned word, but shame on Leona Alleslev for abandoning her post and crossing the floor. The MP for Aurora-Oak Ridges-Richmond Hill’s move smacks of opportunism and feeds into the boring Janus-faced trope of politicians as inherently deceitful. Has she already forgotten why she ran as a Liberal in the first place? Why the Conservatives were voted out in the last election? The state of politics and slumping humanity across our border? The election of Doug Ford and his family legacy on this side of the border ? And the cankerous misogyny (which Ms. Alleslev knows something about) shaping public discourse?

Does she remember truth, duty, valour? Have her values changed so much in three short years? In peacetime, the world cannot be changed in four years. I’m sorry she didn’t stick around and fight. For shame, for shame.

Andrea Cordonier, Burritt’s Rapids, Ont.

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If MPs want to trade in their principles for a new set, let them resign, trigger a by-election and seek the nomination for the party they aspire to join, instead of dragging their constituents with them across the floor. Either that, or finish the term as an independent.

Anna Robinson, Calgary

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Leona Alleslev has an inflated idea of her worth if she thinks her constituents would have voted for her if she had run as a Conservative in 2015. I’ve voted Liberal and I’ve voted Conservative, but I won’t vote Turncoat.

Sarah Rogers, Richmond Hill, Ont.

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I’m sure this has nothing to do with her feeling disrespected after she got dumped from her job as parliamentary secretary to the Public Services Minister.

Sheryl Carsons, Winnipeg

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An MP is elected by their constituents to represent them as a member of a particular party. The decision to switch allegiances should be made by the constituents, not the individual MP. The law should be that if an MP wants to switch parties, they should resign and run in a by-election.

Gordon Foy, Burnaby, B.C.

NAFTA showmanship

Re Freeland To Make Next Push For NAFTA Deal (Report on Business, Sept. 18): As Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland continues her efforts to finalize a renegotiated NAFTA that incorporates the essentials for Canada’s economic prosperity, Ontario Premier Doug Ford and his Economic Development Minister Jim Wilson announce they will parachute into Washington to meet the federal negotiating team to deliver the message that “you bloody well need to get a deal.”

This is 11th-hour political opportunism at its most blatant and cynical. If Ms. Freeland returns with a deal, they can claim their visit successfully nudged her forward and they saved the day! If she backs away for reasons of our national interest, they can express outrage and provide some ammunition to their Conservative federal colleagues. I hope others are holding their nose at this political showmanship.

Rob Wilson, Toronto

Hit pause on PP

Re PP Gets Pooh-Poohed (letters, Sept. 15): In the event that Maxime Bernier’s People’s Party is elected to form the government, can we anticipate renaming the country as the “Democratic People’s Republic of North America”?

David R. Morris, Fredericton

Fading to black

Re As For Sale Signs Litter Media Sector’s Front Yard, Ottawa Needs To Revisit Its Consolidation Policies (Report on Business, Sept. 18): Andrew Willis vastly understates the negative impact of government policy on Canadian media when he says that the sector’s “daunting financial prospects” are only “partly rooted in regulatory issues.”

For decades, Section 19 of the Income Tax Act has penalized Canadian businesses who place ads with foreign media, such as U.S. border stations. But there’s a massive loophole: Section 19 doesn’t apply to digital ads.

By keeping this loophole open, the government allows companies placing ads with the likes of Google and Facebook to dodge the tax penalties laid out in Section 19, reducing public revenue by $1.3-billion per year, and diverting hundreds of millions away from Canadian media – in print, on air and online. The Liberal government must close this internet advertising tax loophole before Canadian media fades to black.

Daniel Bernhard, Executive Director Friends of Canadian Broadcasting

The Koreas, And the U.S.

Re South Korea Seeks Peace At Summit As North Korea Speeds Its Transformation From Pariah (Sept. 18): The possibility that the Trump administration might bring an end to the deadly nuclear confrontation on the Korean peninsula is fast fading. The administration’s vision of a peaceful resolution of the more than 60-year confrontation begins and ends with the unilateral nuclear disarmament of North Korea.

The North Korean view is that peace in the region requires the demilitarization of the entire Korean Peninsula, and that the credibility of U.S. security guarantees must be based on a peace treaty that includes withdrawal of U.S. military forces, including the American nuclear umbrella for the region. The Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT), to which Canada is a signatory, puts a heavy onus on the nuclear powers, including the U.S., to actively pursue nuclear disarmament, in order to deter the spread of nuclear weapons.

It is surely time to start looking at the Korean crisis from the perspective of the treaty, and ask whether the U.S., as well as North Korea, is living up to the spirit and the letter of the treaty.

Scott Burbidge, Port Williams, N.S.

Reconcilable differences

Re The Peculiar History of Four-Letter Personalities (Life & Arts, Sept. 18): The Oxford professor and author Merve Emre says that the Myers Briggs test has been a “liberating force in many people’s lives” and that it has enabled some couples to “articulate what their irreconcilable differences were” so that they “no longer felt bad about leaving their marriage.”

Decades ago, for fun, my husband and I took the Myers Briggs test. Our scores reflected the exact opposite personality traits. This week, we celebrated our 40th wedding anniversary.

Jo Meingarten, Toronto

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