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Greek fallout

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While some say that the victory of the No campaign in Greece is a triumph of democracy, it is really a warning to all potential investors in "safe" government bonds (No, July 6). If a country's people are allowed to vote away their obligations to repay loans, then who in their right minds will want to lend any government money?

The funny thing about borrowing money is that the people who lent it to you eventually want it back. I hope our federal and provincial (debt-ridden) governments are taking note.

Peter Smith, Winnipeg

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Greece gave the world democracy. Maybe it will also be the impetus that gives the world a new global economic order that actually works. An international economic system in which it is projected that, as of this year, 1 per cent of the global population will control 99 per cent of all wealth is not an economic system worth saving.

I applaud the courage of the Greeks for taking a stand and hope that this is the beginning of the end for the unfair global economic system that is geared toward enriching the few by impoverishing the many.

Jillian Skeet, Vancouver

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Why are those very bad people at the European Commission, the European Central Bank and the International Monetary Fund "threatening Greece's democracy and humiliating its people" by asking for their loans to be repaid?

They should simply ignore Greece's habitual debt levels and deficits that were misrepresented by the Greek government to the EU, its widespread tax evasion and corruption, its thriving underground economy and the flight of capital by their richest citizens, and simply write off Greece's debt. While they're at it, they should lend Greece more money to help the country get back on its feet.

Marty Cutler, Toronto

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Law school debate

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John Carpay wants Trinity Western University to have it both ways in demanding that its law graduates be recognized by the Law Society of Upper Canada, despite the school's code of conduct that discriminates against gay students (A Harsh Blow Against Freedom of Association, July 6).

If the LSUC is a public institution that must respect freedom of association, then any accredited law school whose graduates the law society must accept as candidates for membership should also be expected to abide by requirements of non-discrimination (therefore justifying the LSUC's rejection).

Conversely, if the LSUC is a private institution, then freedom of association means it is as free to discriminate as any other private institution (as Mr. Carpay forcefully argues) and it can reject people from any law school on matters of ideology. In either case, the court ruling affirming the LSUC's decision is consistent with freedom of association.

Allan Olley, Oakville, Ont.

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Re Court Rules Against Christian Law School, July 3: This ruling against Trinity Western University is a blow to freedom of religion. There are many law schools in Canada, so how does this particular school's rules prevent anyone from getting a law degree if they so desire? The ruling would make sense only if Trinity Western were the only school in Canada offering such a degree. As for its graduates, they would be required to uphold Canadian law like any other lawyer. This ruling defies common sense.

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Janet Gardner, Cobourg, Ont.

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Hold the applause

Re A Belated Change Of Heart, Editorial, July 4: Yes, the Canadian government has finally acknowledged the dreadful health effects of chrysotile asbestos and stopped voting against its inclusion in the Rotterdam Convention list of dangerous substances. Nevertheless, by not speaking out forcefully against trade in this deadly chemical, Canada has abetted the successful efforts of Russia, India and other uranium producers to block its inclusion in the convention list.

This chemical will continue to be traded worldwide and Canada will be shamefully complicit in perpetuating its ongoing and devastating impacts on the health of millions of workers and their families.

Gracia Janes, Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ont.

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Selfie starter

Re Valuing Girls: A Selfie With Dad Is A Start, July 6: Amrit Dhillon highlights an interesting dichotomy, that of "selfies" with dad and WhatsApp with the ancient, misogynistic practice of dowry (for girls) in rural India. Given the projected deficit of women in India by 2040, perhaps parents of boys will then be obliged to offer dowries to compete for brides, unless the practice of dowries is allowed to quietly disappear in the intervening time. Let's hope this is the case.

Susan Silverman, Toronto

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India and some countries in the Arab world need to take a collective selfie of their cultures and their intertwined religious practices to check for female feticide and hatred of women.

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Poverty is not an excuse, as other poor cultures do not treat women in this way. Slogans such as "daughters are a gift to the world" do nothing if the educational system is not reformed, and if a country's political and religious establishments do not work together to change the hearts and minds of their citizens.

Elie Nasrallah, Ottawa

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Meaning of marriage

Re Navigating Marriage As A High-Functioning Partnership, Life, July 3: Apparently, married people these days are primarily life coaches to help each other on their individual "voyage of self-discovery."

While husbands and wives have always supported one another, it used to be understood that building a stronger whole often included sacrifice. Today, it seems the attitude is, "What's in it for me?" If you ask too much of your marriage, you might just end up with no marriage.

Barbara Silburt, Halifax

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Big score for women

John Doyle raises many good points about media coverage of women's sports (Battle Of The Sexes, Arts, July 6). But he hurries over what is at the heart of the issue: entertainment value. Since all professional sports are products for our amusement, the Australian commentator's point about men's supposed superiority in almost every sport is moot.

We were thoroughly entertained by much of what we watched in the Women's World Cup – superb ball control, deadly accurate passing, a seemingly inexhaustible passion for the game. And a welcome dearth of writhing on the ground in search of a favourable call.

C. Harrison, Dundas, Ont.

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