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Politics From the comments: ‘You’re a model for all Canadian elected officials.’ Readers react to resignation of Jody Wilson-Raybould

Today, readers are reacting to the resignation of Jody Wilson-Raybould from Justin Trudeau’s cabinet in the midst of allegations that the PMO tried to pressure her while she was justice minister to abandon a corruption and fraud prosecution of SNC-Lavalin.

Jody Wilson-Raybould has submitted her resignation from Justin Trudeau’s cabinet.

Chris Wattie/Reuters

DRYBURGH6:

Thank you Ms. Wilson-Raybould for making me rethink my opinion of politicians. You’re a model for all Canadian elected officials.

Kidster:

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I suspect she is seeking advice to assess what elements of the Cabinet discussions are the subject of solicitor client privilege and which are possibly not, among other things. Moreover, A lawyer who has lost the confidence of her client is ethically bound to resign. I commend her for her principled stand under what must be very stressful circumstances.

dylanrayburn:

Trudeau on Monday: "Her presence in cabinet should actually speak for itself." Jody Wilson-Raybould on Tuesday: "I resign from cabinet." So, does her absence from cabinet speak for itself, too?

waynes2:

A lot of talk about lost jobs if SNC-Lavalin fails. We should remember that if SNC-Lavalin is not getting the jobs, someone else will. Many of their staff would be picked up by competitors who would now be getting more contracts. The demand for these services will still be there and the industry will still need the experienced people. Reminds me a bit of business news stories about layoffs at a trucking firm because they lost a contract. Those stories never mention that another firm won the contract and will be hiring the same number of drivers. The material being transported still needs to be transported and trucks and drivers will still be needed.What we need now is a bunch of SNC-Lavalin staff to form their own company dedicated to work with integrity. In my opinion, SNC-Lavalin does not qualify for remediation because they have had a series of offences with even the former CEO being convicted. This is not a problem with a few rogue employees when the CEO looks the other way. When corruption goes right to the top it is quite likely that more than a couple of employees have cut some corners.

Curious Georgie:

SNC-Lavalin is a huge corporation intrinsically linked to Quebec and Canadian governments. If there is a major infrastructure program to be done, a highway, a power dam, a nuclear plant, a bridge, etc. they will build it. They operate worldwide and have expertise in mining, oil, engineering and are the go-to corporation to carry out major government and private construction ventures. Spending millions taking them to court on a criminal charge doesn’t make sense when a hefty fine will provide the punitive measures required. So, if Mr. Trudeau attempted to promote this course of action then I agree with him, and Ms. Wilson-Raybould should have fallen into line to preserve party unity.

app_66295452:

Her integrity is to be admired and respected. This could not have be an easy decision, but what she has done speaks highly of her as a person.

“I am writing to tender my resignation as the Minister of Veterans Affairs and Associate Minister of National Defence,” Ms. Wilson-Raybould wrote to the Prime Minister.

Adrian Wyld/The Canadian Press

Jack Reacher:

This does not look good for PM Trudeau and his cabinet ministers. You have to wonder why other cabinet ministers are not resigning. Especially Liberal cabinet ministers from Western Canada.

tallcanuck11:

This is what happens when you try to manipulate and influence someone who is an intellectual heavyweight, who has serious experience, and who hasn't abandoned their integrity.

franko14:

I would vote for her.

KidLester:

Smart move for her, distancing herself from the fray as best she can. Ms Wilson-Raybould's reputation is getting stronger and she may end up a serious force in federal politics. Kudos to The Globe and Mail for breaking such an important story.

J.K. Galbraith:

This makes the story far larger and more serious than before.

Berliner4:

I highly commend Ms. Wilson-Raybould for doing the right thing. Having been so nastily "dumped" from a portfolio she held with diligence, she needed to resign. Maybe she can do all Canadians a huge favour and tell the truth and nothing but the truth as to what went on with this outrageous story. What is happening in Canada is akin to the way countries like Cuba, Venezuela and others behave. Shameful.

Geordie19:

Not surprising. Wish her well in future endeavors.

Pylot Project:

"Her presence in cabinet should actually speak for itself," the prime minister had said Monday. I would say her resignation screams the contrary.

Joe Schlesinger in 2003.

Readers are also reflecting on the life and death of Joe Schlesinger, a celebrated former CBC foreign correspondent whose life work resonated with many of our commenters.

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rosedale71:

My goodness, what an icon of Canadian journalism, and probably the biggest influence on a generation of young men (including me) and women who chose television journalism for a career. Courageous, daring, unflappable, accurate, fair, and so articulate in his reporting. CBC News was a great organization in the 60s, 70s, and 80s, and there was no one greater on that team than Joe Schlesinger.

Bernibee3:

What a career! Joe was a unique and special voice as a reporter but more than that you knew he was a unique and special man. We shall dearly miss the reporter, however, we shall miss the man even more.

Mr. Schlesinger, right, chats with Nicholas Winton, the British stockbroker who helped spirit him and other Jewish children out of Europe before the Second World War erupted.

mbadams:

I am truly saddened to read that Joe Schlesinger is no longer with us. What a fine and honourable man. How fascinating it was to grow up listening to his reports. He single handedly broadened my view of the world in an utterly engaging way. Canada was lucky to have him.

Dianne440:

I always made a point of listening intently to any report from Mr. Schlesinger because I knew his point of view would be humane and he would often take a slightly different slant on a situation than other reporters. I was sorry when he retired but pleased when he continued to contribute stories, including the lovely tribute to the businessman who saved so many Czech children.

Omerusl:

If "Schlesinger" was reporting, I paid attention. All I needed to hear was "Schlesinger reporting." When it called for it I would say "Joe is on..." and a whole room would go silent and wait. For those that didn't wait I would shush them. It is with a profound sense of personal loss that I write this. I'm a fact based person and Joe was integral to keeping me sane in the insanity for decades. That makes the loss of him for me, personal. To Joe, You did enough, you tried hard, you inspired me, educated many, and gave us some hope with the sadness. I will miss you.

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If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

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