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Liberal MP William Amos wear a Canadian flag mask as Prime Minister Justin Trudeau speaks during a news conference in Chelsea, Que., June 19, 2020.

Adrian Wyld/The Canadian Press

The Liberal MP who was recently caught naked on camera has garnered worldwide attention once more for a similar display during a virtual parliamentary session.

In a statement posted on Twitter late Thursday night, William Amos said, “Last night, while attending House of Commons proceedings virtually, in a non-public setting, I urinated without realizing I was on camera.” He didn’t provide further details.

The event was broadcast on closed channels in Parliament that were not visible to the public.

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Mr. Amos’s latest exposure attracted widespread international coverage on Friday, including by the BBC, CNN, the Daily Mail and The New York Times.

The MP for Pontiac Quebec said he is “deeply embarrassed” by Wednesday’s incident, which he said was “completely unacceptable.”

Liberal MP caught on camera during virtual House of Commons, again

Speaker says photo of naked MP an affront to dignity of House of Commons

Mr. Amos also announced he is temporarily stepping down as parliamentary secretary to Industry Minister François-Philippe Champagne, and from the veterans affairs committee.

He said he would take that time to “seek assistance,” but made no mention of what that would entail.

The Globe requested elaboration from Mr. Amos’s office, but received no reply.

Asked about the incident, NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh said, “There’s no way we can say what Mr. Amos did was appropriate. It’s inappropriate.”

Mr. Singh also said the House of Commons should decide how to deal with Mr. Amos’s on-camera exposure.

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Referring to Mr. Amos’s statement that he intends to seek help, Mr. Singh said, “I think the focus should be on him getting the help and I wish him well.”

Karen Vecchio, Conservative deputy house leader, said in a statement that the House of Commons “must be free of this type of unacceptable behavior.”

“The Liberals are claiming that Will Amos accidentally exposed himself to his colleagues and support staff in the House of Commons. However, we are now hearing through media reports that Mr. Amos actually urinated in a coffee cup while on camera, participating in virtual parliament,” she said. “This is a pattern of behavior from Mr. Amos.”

In the first incident, Mr. Amos disrobed and was seen naked on camera on April 14 during virtual question period, which took place on an internal parliamentary feed not visible to the public.

He apologized for the incident, saying he had returned from a run and was changing in his office. Mr. Amos said he was unaware his camera was on and sharing his image with his colleagues.

Bloc Québécois MP Sébastien Lemire took a screenshot, and later apologized in the House of Commons after the media got the photo, which enabled it to spread across the world. Mr. Lemire said he did not know how the leak happened.

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In a statement the next day, Chief Government Whip Mark Holland said the release of the photo was “disturbing” and a “potentially criminal act.” He called for the board of internal economy, which governs the House, to investigate.

The board was to meet on Thursday, and Mr. Lemire was to answer questions related to the photo, but the session was postponed to an undetermined date.

Charles-Eric Lépine, chief of staff for Mr. Holland, provided a statement to The Globe on Friday that did not address whether the investigation will continue or be dropped in light of the new incident.

“It is important to have a safe workplace environment for everyone on Parliament Hill, and we take these matters extremely seriously,” Mr. Lépine said.

Mr. Amos said in his Thursday evening statement that he “will continue to represent my constituents and I’m grateful to be their voice in Parliament.”

Asked if Mr. Amos will run in the next election, Liberal Party spokesperson Braeden Caley said in an e-mail that the party does not comment on specific nominations.

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The Liberals have not yet announced who will be their candidate for the Pontiac riding in the next election.

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