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Canadians will be asked this fall to choose between moving forward with the Liberals or getting ahead with the Conservatives.

Jeff McIntosh/The Canadian Press

Both the Liberal Party and the Conservative Party have unveiled their campaign slogans ahead of the federal election, which will be featured in TV ads beginning Monday.

The Liberals have selected “Choose forward” as their new slogan. In a video advertisement, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is shown riding a bus and interacting with constituents in his Montreal riding of Papineau as he warns against conservative politicians who claim to be for the people, but cut services.

The new Conservative branding showcases leader Andrew Scheer against a forest background saying the slogan: "It’s time for you to get ahead.” In the ad, Mr. Scheer says Canadians can get ahead through a party that will lower the cost of living and leave more money in their pockets.

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Liberal spokesman Braeden Caley said the party’s new slogan will be featured in TV ads and a digital campaign, both of which will be promoted nationally throughout the weeks ahead. Mr. Caley said the advertising includes a large-scale online campaign, a new website and featured stories from Canadians who “have a personal connection to Canada’s progress since 2015.”

“This theme of this campaign speaks to Justin Trudeau’s commitment to move forward with progress that helps people every day, and it highlights the important choice that Canadians will make in this fall’s election,” Mr. Caley said in an e-mail.

The Liberal branding also showcases a sustained effort to associate the federal Conservatives with the provincial conservatives in Ontario, as the ad makes direct reference to Ontario Premier Doug Ford’s slogan “For the people.” Mr. Ford’s popularity has plummeted since his election just over a year ago.

Mr. Scheer makes no direct reference to the Liberal Party or to Mr. Trudeau in the Conservatives’ video. Rather, he said that he thinks Canadians are frustrated because they’re working hard and “following all the rules,” but still feel that they’re falling further behind or can barely get by.

Conservative spokesman Cory Hann said the party will be highlighting its positive plan to help Canadian families get ahead, while reminding them that Mr. Trudeau is not as advertised.

“Justin Trudeau will desperately try to make this campaign about anything except for his record of making life harder and more unaffordable for Canadians through scandal, waste, endless deficits, and neverending tax hikes,” Mr. Hann said in an e-mail.

The trend of moving “forward” or “ahead” continues with the Green Party, which earlier this summer launched its 2019 campaign slogan, “Not left. Not right. Forward together.”

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Mélanie Richer, a spokeswoman for the New Democrats, said the party has been campaigning with the slogans “On your side” and “A new deal for people.”

Ms. Richer said the party’s campaign slogan will be unveiled next week with some new ads.

Voters are scheduled to head to the polls on Oct. 21, and the campaign is expected to be formally launched in early September.

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