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Politics New immigration pilot program to offer permanent residency to migrant farm workers

A new three-year immigration experiment that would give migrant workers a path to permanent residency in Canada is getting a thumbs-up from industry but a thumbs-down from migrant-rights groups.

Over the past several years, industries such as meat cutting and processing and mushroom farming have relied on seasonal temporary foreign workers because of labour shortages, even though the work is not seasonal.

A new pilot program announced on Friday aims to attract and retain migrant workers by giving them an opportunity to become permanent residents.

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Currently, migrant farm workers who come to Canada through the program for seasonal agricultural workers are given limited-term work permits and do not have a pathway to permanent residency.

Temporary foreign farm workers who are eligible for this new pilot would be able to apply for permanent residency after 12 months and, if they’re approved, would also be allowed to bring their families to Canada.

Industry groups are applauding the new program, which they say is badly needed to address a lack of people available or willing to work on farms and in food-processing plants.

A study by the Canadian Agricultural Human Resource Council released last month found farmers across Canada lost $2.9-billion in sales because of unfilled job vacancies. The study also found the situation has improved, thanks to access to migrant workers and new technologies, but Canadian farms and agri-food plants are still dealing with 16,500 vacancies.

Ryan Koeslag, executive vice-president of the Canadian Mushroom Growers Association, said Friday he is pleased to see the federal government willing to adapt its immigration policies to benefit certain agriculture producers.

“For the last decade or more, mushroom growers and other farmers, have fought for immigration access for our sector’s farm workers employed in year-round jobs,” Mr. Koeslag said.

But Chris Ramsaroop, spokesman for the group Justice for Migrant Workers, said the access to permanent residency will only apply to those who take part in this narrow pilot program and will continue to be unavailable to the thousands of migrant farm-workers who arrive through the seasonal agriculture workers program.

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“We’re dividing agricultural workers based on which industries are more deserving than others,” he said, noting migrant workers who have already been working in Canada in meat production or mushroom plants will have easier access to this program than workers on fruit or vegetable farms.

Mr. Ramsaroop says migrant groups continue to call on the government to offer all temporary foreign workers permanent status upon arrival in Canada.

A maximum of 2,750 principal applicants, plus family members, are to be accepted for processing each year during the three-year pilot. Applications are to be accepted beginning in 2020.

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