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Politics Nova Scotia Tories to leave seats to campaign federally after criticism from premier

Nova Scotia Premier Stephen McNeil talks with reporters as the Canadian premiers meet in St. Andrews, N.B. on July 19, 2018.

Andrew Vaughan/The Canadian Press

A trio of Nova Scotia Progressive Conservatives who faced criticism for continuing to draw a provincial salary as members of the legislature after winning federal nominations are stepping down at the end of this month.

Chris d’Entremont, a 49-year-old former minister of health, says he’s resigning his seat to focus on the upcoming federal campaign in the riding of West Nova.

Alfie MacLeod, a veteran Cape Breton member of the legislature, is leaving to run in Cape Breton-Canso for the Conservatives, and Eddie Orrell is running in the federal riding of Sydney-Victoria.

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Originally, the politicians had mused about drawing salaries over the summer while continuing to campaign federally in their free time.

Liberal Premier Stephen McNeil had suggested it made “no sense” for the three Progressive Conservatives and an NDP member to continue to build their pensions while campaigning for a federal seat.

The veteran politicians say they hope to reverse Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s sweep of Atlantic Canada in the last federal election.

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