Skip to main content
The Globe and Mail
Support Quality Journalism
The Globe and Mail
First Access to Latest
Investment News
Collection of curated
e-books and guides
Inform your decisions via
Globe Investor Tools
Just$1.99
per week
for first 24 weeks

Enjoy unlimited digital access
Enjoy Unlimited Digital Access
Get full access to globeandmail.com
Just $1.99 per week for the first 24 weeks
Just $1.99 per week for the first 24 weeks
var select={root:".js-sub-pencil",control:".js-sub-pencil-control",open:"o-sub-pencil--open",closed:"o-sub-pencil--closed"},dom={},allowExpand=!0;function pencilInit(o){var e=arguments.length>1&&void 0!==arguments[1]&&arguments[1];select.root=o,dom.root=document.querySelector(select.root),dom.root&&(dom.control=document.querySelector(select.control),dom.control.addEventListener("click",onToggleClicked),setPanelState(e),window.addEventListener("scroll",onWindowScroll),dom.root.removeAttribute("hidden"))}function isPanelOpen(){return dom.root.classList.contains(select.open)}function setPanelState(o){dom.root.classList[o?"add":"remove"](select.open),dom.root.classList[o?"remove":"add"](select.closed),dom.control.setAttribute("aria-expanded",o)}function onToggleClicked(){var l=!isPanelOpen();setPanelState(l)}function onWindowScroll(){window.requestAnimationFrame(function() {var l=isPanelOpen(),n=0===(document.body.scrollTop||document.documentElement.scrollTop);n||l||!allowExpand?n&&l&&(allowExpand=!0,setPanelState(!1)):(allowExpand=!1,setPanelState(!0))});}pencilInit(".js-sub-pencil",!1); // via darwin-bg var slideIndex = 0; carousel(); function carousel() { var i; var x = document.getElementsByClassName("subs_valueprop"); for (i = 0; i < x.length; i++) { x[i].style.display = "none"; } slideIndex++; if (slideIndex> x.length) { slideIndex = 1; } x[slideIndex - 1].style.display = "block"; setTimeout(carousel, 2500); }

Ontario Associate Minister of Children and Women's Issues Jill Dunlop makes an announcement at the daily briefing on COVID-19 at the legislature in Toronto on June 25, 2020.

Steve Russell/The Canadian Press

The Ontario government released its plan to update the province’s child welfare system on Wednesday, saying its new strategy will focus on prevention and early intervention.

The government, which announced no funding on Wednesday, said its new system will focus on priorities such as ensuring community-based prevention services are designed to keep children safe in family environments and improving the quality of residential care for children and youth.

More than 12,000 children and youth are in the care of children’s aid societies in Ontario.

Story continues below advertisement

In an interview with The Globe And Mail on Wednesday, Jill Dunlop, associate minister of children and women’s issues, said the fundamental change being announced is a shift from protection to prevention.

The best place for a child to be raised is with their family, she added.

“Whether that is Mom, Dad, grandparents, aunts and uncles coming together, but really having that support because children who are raised in a group home, we see terrible results,” she said. “The outcomes are not good.”

Former provincial children’s advocate Irwin Elman told The Globe on Wednesday that he is cynical about the modernization and that actions, not words, are required to save lives of children dying in care.

The Aboriginal Peoples Television Network reported last week that 11 Indigenous children died in the past four months connected to Ontario’s child welfare system.

“She [the associate minister] carries the weight of responsibility for every Indigenous and Black child so over-represented in care who were taken from their family,” Mr. Elman said.

“She carries the responsibility for the oppressive challenges children living in care face and their often dismal life outcomes. She has an opportunity. Those children are her legacy.”

Story continues below advertisement

Ontario said the new child welfare strategy was developed with input from stakeholders, including youth, families, caregivers, First Nations, Inuit and Métis partners, and community organizations.

The executive director of the Native Child and Family Services of Toronto, Jeff Schiffer, said in a statement he was heartened by the approach to co-develop services with First Nations, Inuit, Métis and urban Indigenous partners to try to reduce over-representation of Indigenous children in the system.

Ontario said there were more than 100 engagement sessions over the past year and that there were more than 3,000 responses provided through an online survey.

Our Morning Update and Evening Update newsletters are written by Globe editors, giving you a concise summary of the day’s most important headlines. Sign up today.

Follow related topics

Report an error Editorial code of conduct
Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

Comments that violate our community guidelines will be removed.

Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

To view this site properly, enable cookies in your browser. Read our privacy policy to learn more.
How to enable cookies