Skip to main content
The Globe and Mail
Support Quality Journalism.
The Globe and Mail
First Access to Latest
Investment News
Collection of curated
e-books and guides
Inform your decisions via
Globe Investor Tools
Just$1.99
per week
for first 24 weeks

Enjoy unlimited digital access
Enjoy Unlimited Digital Access
Get full access to globeandmail.com
Just $1.99 per week for the first 24 weeks
Just $1.99 per week for the first 24 weeks
var select={root:".js-sub-pencil",control:".js-sub-pencil-control",open:"o-sub-pencil--open",closed:"o-sub-pencil--closed"},dom={},allowExpand=!0;function pencilInit(o){var e=arguments.length>1&&void 0!==arguments[1]&&arguments[1];select.root=o,dom.root=document.querySelector(select.root),dom.root&&(dom.control=document.querySelector(select.control),dom.control.addEventListener("click",onToggleClicked),setPanelState(e),window.addEventListener("scroll",onWindowScroll),dom.root.removeAttribute("hidden"))}function isPanelOpen(){return dom.root.classList.contains(select.open)}function setPanelState(o){dom.root.classList[o?"add":"remove"](select.open),dom.root.classList[o?"remove":"add"](select.closed),dom.control.setAttribute("aria-expanded",o)}function onToggleClicked(){var l=!isPanelOpen();setPanelState(l)}function onWindowScroll(){window.requestAnimationFrame(function() {var l=isPanelOpen(),n=0===(document.body.scrollTop||document.documentElement.scrollTop);n||l||!allowExpand?n&&l&&(allowExpand=!0,setPanelState(!1)):(allowExpand=!1,setPanelState(!0))});}pencilInit(".js-sub-pencil",!1); // via darwin-bg var slideIndex = 0; carousel(); function carousel() { var i; var x = document.getElementsByClassName("subs_valueprop"); for (i = 0; i < x.length; i++) { x[i].style.display = "none"; } slideIndex++; if (slideIndex> x.length) { slideIndex = 1; } x[slideIndex - 1].style.display = "block"; setTimeout(carousel, 2500); } //

Indigenous Services Minister Marc Miller speaks during a news conference on the COVID-19 pandemic in Ottawa, on Wednesday, Jan. 27, 2021.

Justin Tang/The Canadian Press

The federal government will work with Indigenous leaders to co-develop legislation aimed at giving First Nations, Metis and Inuit people control over the delivery of health care in their communities.

Indigenous Services Minister Marc Miller announced the launch of the co-development process Thursday at the conclusion of a two-day virtual meeting on anti-Indigenous racism in Canada’s health care system.

Miller said the aim is to transform health care in Indigenous communities by ensuring Indigenous control over the development and delivery of health services.

Story continues below advertisement

“We know that this is a system that has failed Indigenous Peoples … and treated Indigenous Peoples as second-class citizens,” he told a virtual news conference.

But he warned it will take some time to develop the legislation.

“If people had a solution tomorrow, it would be an entire misunderstanding of the scope of the problem.”

Miller noted that the task is complicated by the fact that delivery of health care is jealously guarded provincial jurisdiction. But he said all provinces and territories were represented during the two-day meeting and all seem committed, to varying degrees, to tackling racism in the health system.

In her recent economic update, Finance Minister Chrystia Freeland committed $15.6 million over two years to support the development of Indigenous health care legislation in partnership with First Nations, Inuit and Metis leaders.

Assembly of First Nations National Chief Perry Bellegarde said the process will start with what he called “pre-engagement consultation” with Indigenous leaders “over the next few months.”

He welcomed the initiative as a “step toward addressing the inequities and discrimination toward First Nations and other Indigenous Peoples in Canada’s health care systems.”

Story continues below advertisement

“Long-standing inequities, underscored by the COVID-19 pandemic, continue to result in poor health outcomes for First Nations across Canada,” Bellegarde said in a statement.

Health Minister Patty Hajdu announced $4 million in support for a national consortium, led by Indigenous physicians, to implement projects to educate doctors on the provision of “culturally safe” health care that is “free from discrimination.”

“One thing that I heard clearly from all participants was this is the time to act,” she said.

“There was a complete acknowledgment I think by all participants that what we’re doing is not working for Indigenous People, that we continue to have incidents like (Joyce Echaquan),” Hajdu said.

“It’s common, it’s regular and it not only creates unequal levels of care, it creates actually barriers to care.”

Echaquan, an Atikamekw mother of seven, died in a Quebec hospital last September after livestreaming video of herself as she pleaded for help. The video showed two female hospital staff insulting Echaquan, including calling her stupid and suggesting she would be better off dead.

Report an error
Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

If you do not see your comment posted immediately, it is being reviewed by the moderation team and may appear shortly, generally within an hour.

We aim to have all comments reviewed in a timely manner.

Comments that violate our community guidelines will not be posted.

Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

To view this site properly, enable cookies in your browser. Read our privacy policy to learn more.
How to enable cookies