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“The science is clear; for all the ambitious climate action we’ve seen – governments need to move faster and with greater urgency. We’re feeding this fire while the means to extinguish it are within reach.”

That’s from Joyce Msuya, the deputy executive director of the United Nations Environment Programme. The UN group says in its new annual report that most of the world’s biggest greenhouse-gas emitters – including Canada – are not likely to meet the reduction targets they agreed to in the 2015 Paris climate treaty.

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Those targets were agreed to because scientists said they could help keep the overall global climate from warming less than 2 degrees, which would avoid some of the worst effects such as mass species extinction and devastating droughts.

The year 2030 – which is when the Canadian government says it will have 30 per cent lower emissions than it did in 2005 – is not that far away.

This is the daily Politics Briefing newsletter, written by Chris Hannay in Ottawa. It is exclusively available only to our digital subscribers. Have any feedback? Let us know what you think.

TODAY’S HEADLINES

The Alberta government is trying to get oil producers to cut their production, because the market already has too much crude. Not all companies agree that it is a problem – refiners, for instance, like cheap crude – but Alberta oil prices have plunged far below what’s being extracted in the U.S.

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and U.S. President Donald Trump say they agree on one thing: Neither is happy about General Motors closing five plants.

Liberal MP Raj Grewal, who said he would quit his job last week but is still officially in the House of Commons, is being investigated by the RCMP for his multimillion-dollar gambling activities and where that money could have come from. For most of this year, Mr. Grewal was a member of the House finance committee and an active participant in the committee’s study of money laundering. During the hearings, according to a review of the transcripts, he would ask RCMP or other security officials questions involving the Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada (FINTRAC), which collects data on financial transactions of more than $10,000 at financial institutions and casinos, such as: “Would there be a scenario in which a financial institution would provide what they think is a suspicious transaction to FINTRAC, FINTRAC would launch an investigation, but the individual account holder would never know that this was taking place?”

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The Liberal government’s proposed new tax credit for digital news subscriptions will be worth 15 per cent, or about two months out of a year’s subscription. The credit is supposed to encourage Canadians to subscribe to online news sources. (If you’re reading this, you already know the value of a Globe subscription. But, hey, what about giving the gift of news to your friends or family during the holidays?)

A few Canadian MPs were among an international group of lawmakers grilling Facebook executives in Britain about how the social-media giant uses personal data. Notably not in attendance at the hearing: Mark Zuckerberg.

And The Globe’s Roy MacGregor travelled to Gananoque, the small Ontario town that is host to a charity hockey game tonight. The town received the ice rink that sat on Parliament Hill for the Canada 150 celebrations. The rink is set to be named after Gord Brown, the local MP who died of a heart attack earlier this year.

Campbell Clark (The Globe and Mail) on MPs, like Raj Grewal, who earn outside income: “The point is that Canadians should not have to worry about whether an MP is giving his boss special treatment. They should be able to assume the constituents are his only boss.”

Lawrence Martin (The Globe and Mail) on the politics of climate change: “Instead of global warming or climate change, the affliction should be called what it is: climate crisis or climate cancer. Or, instead of the cozy-sounding global warming, planetary destruction would be more apt.”

Barrie McKenna (The Globe and Mail) on the closure of the General Motors plant in Oshawa, Ont.: “Yes, the looming plant closure is undeniably terrible for the city of Oshawa, the affected workers, its vast network of suppliers and the tens of thousands of people who depend on the economic spinoffs. And it’s certainly not a good omen for Canada’s shrunken auto sector. But Oshawa is not the ‘engine’ of Canada’s auto industry. It used to be, but it hasn’t been for at least a decade. Oshawa has become a symbol of its past, rather than its present.”

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Megan McArdle (Washington Post) on the GM closures in the U.S.: “The truth is that Trump didn’t deserve much credit for the jobs added during his first two years in office; he also doesn’t deserve much blame for the jobs GM is now shedding.”

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