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Hello,

The charges against Chief Allan Adam of the Athabasca Chipewyan First Nation have been dropped. Chief Adam’s violent arrest in April was captured on video and came to public light earlier this month. Chief Adam was stopped for an expired licence plate, but was pushed to the ground by an officer, punched repeatedly and charged with resisting arrest. Assembly of First Nations National Chief Perry Bellegarde, for one, said the charges should never have been filed.

On another note, RCMP Commissioner Brenda Lucki testified at the House public safety committee last night on the subject of systemic racism in the force. She acknowledged that systemic racism does exist in the RCMP, but the example she offered was that physical evaluation tests required participants to jump a length of six feet. “And there are people in all different cultures that may not be six feet, including there’s not a lot of women that are six feet tall, that would not be able to get through that type of test,” she said. Liberal MP Greg Fergus said that wasn’t a great example.

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This is the daily Politics Briefing newsletter, written by Chris Hannay. It is available exclusively to our digital subscribers. If you’re reading this on the web, subscribers can sign up for the Politics newsletter and more than 20 others on our newsletter signup page. Have any feedback? Let us know what you think.

TODAY’S HEADLINES

Foreign Affairs Minister François-Philippe Champagne says he has repaid the two mortgages he had with a state-owned Chinese bank.

Canada is hinting it could retaliate if the U.S. reimposes tariffs on aluminum and steel.

Canadian tech companies are trying to lure engineering talent to Canada after the Trump administration ordered a temporary ban on some employment-related visas.

Former long-time MP Jay Hill is the new interim leader of Alberta’s separatist Wexit party.

Ontario is providing full funding for long-term care homes regardless of occupancy levels as the operators try to contain the spread of the novel coronavirus.

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And Atlantic provinces are easing travel restrictions between each other, as they seem to – for now – have COVID-19 outbreaks under control.

Andrew Coyne (The Globe and Mail) on the case against the government intervening in Meng Wanzhou’s case: “Even if it procured the release of the two Michaels – and there is ample reason to doubt that it would – it would signal to China that their tactic had worked: that the taking of hostages was a legitimate and effective instrument of statecraft. China could be expected to draw the appropriate lesson for future conflicts.”

Jaren Kerr (The Globe and Mail) on how cities can address systemic racism: “There are bold proposals in the zeitgeist to fix things: defund the police, give descendants of African slaves reparations, hire more Black people in leadership roles. Like them or not, these ideas would actually do something to change Black people’s lives. Renaming Dundas Street won’t.”

Judy Grant (Maclean’s) on her experience as a Black woman and a police officer: “The Black and racialized officers who critically question their work roles, complain about the anti-Black racism and speak out against discrimination, endure punishment that shows up in the form of a hostile work environment rife with systemic racism. Reprisal, differential treatment and professional standards investigations are only the first tier of abuses that some officers suffer. This is what happened to me before I went on stress leave in 2016.”

Catherine Ford (Calgary Herald) on taking care of our elderly Canadians: “The elderly often have no advocates. They may not live in the same city as their children; their own parents are long gone; frequently their siblings are, also. The end-of-life stories are heartbreaking and often ignored. The tree in the forest that falls and nobody hears. The ones we do hear are told by others because so many of the frail are afraid to speak out.”

John Doyle (The Globe and Mail) on Ben Mulroney and the privilege of having a famous family: “With a little mischief in mind, I conducted the Most Irritating Canadian (TV-related) poll in this column [in 2004], asking readers to write about the most bothersome Canadian persons on TV. Mulroney, then hosting Canadian Idol, was in the Top Five from the get-go. ... I didn’t hear from Ben Mulroney directly of course. Oh my, no. I did hear from Senator Marjory LeBreton, the former deputy chief of staff in Brian Mulroney’s government. Her letter to the Editor-in-Chief and Publisher and CEO of this newspaper, also cc’d me, to let me know there was umbrage taken at Ben Mulroney being teased in my column.”

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