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Politics Politics Briefing: Election campaign to begin Wednesday

Hello,

And they’re off – starting tomorrow.

The federal election campaign is set to begin tomorrow morning when Justin Trudeau, in his role as Prime Minister, visits Governor-General Julie Payette to officially dissolve Parliament and have writs issued for the election.

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As Liberal Leader, Justin Trudeau will kick off his party’s campaign with a speech outside Rideau Hall.

Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer will start Wednesday in Trois-Rivières, Que., and end the day in Woodbridge, Ont., near Toronto.

NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh is in Southwestern Ontario and will be in London, Ont., tomorrow when the writ drops.

Green Party Leader Elizabeth May will be on Vancouver Island.

This is the daily Politics Briefing newsletter, written by Chris Hannay. It is available exclusively to our digital subscribers. If you’re reading this on the web, subscribers can sign up for the Politics newsletter and more than 20 others on our newsletter signup page. Have any feedback? Let us know what you think.

TODAY’S HEADLINES

Voters in Manitoba head to the polls today to decide whether to re-elect Brian Pallister’s Progressive Conservatives or return the NDP to power under new leader Wab Kinew. The provincial campaign has been fought on the usual ideological lines: the PCs say they will cut taxes and balance the province’s budget, whereas the New Democrats say they want to invest in social services, particularly in hospitals.

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A Nanos Research survey conducted for The Globe and Mail asked a number of leadership questions, including: “Which federal party leader, if any, would be best at leading an ethical government?” The answer: A tight race between Ms. May and Mr. Scheer, with Mr. Trudeau just behind. “It doesn’t matter who’s in power, no one has a big advantage on the ethics front and it speaks to the cynicism that people have about any politician being ethical,” founder Nik Nanos said. (You can read all the details of the poll, including methodology, here.)

Ms. May was forced to clarify the Green Party’s policy on abortion access. After initially telling the CBC that she could not “silence” an MP who wanted to reopen the abortion issue in Parliament, she later on Monday told The Globe that she would push to get an MP who did so ousted from the Green Party. The party said it also prescreens its candidates for their position on the issue and that all Green candidates are pro-choice.

The Assembly of First Nations says the federal parties need to make climate change the No. 1 issue in the election this year, as well as addressing other concerns for those living on reserves, such as housing and justice reforms.

The Alberta government has begun its inquiry into environmental groups. Premier Jason Kenney says the inquiry is to root out any foreign funding the groups receive.

A Libertarian group called the Runnymede Society is seeking influence in Canada’s law schools, where it is pushing skepticism to what it says is too much liberalism on Canada’s courts. A favourite among the group is Federal Court of Appeal Justice Marc Nadon, whose appointment to the Supreme Court by Stephen Harper was blocked because he was judged to not have the right credentials for the seat.

Canada is at odds with China in wanting Taiwan included in an international meeting of civil-aviation authorities in Montreal later this month.

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And today in Brexit: the British Parliament has been prorogued until Oct. 14. MPs in the House of Commons shot down another attempt by Prime Minister Boris Johnson to call an election and passed a law that requires him to have a deal with the European Union in place before Britain leaves. “I will go to Brussels … and negotiate our departure on the 31st of October, hopefully with a deal but without one if necessary,” Mr. Johnson said – although not having a deal would see the Prime Minister break the law.

Globe and Mail editorial board on the length of the campaign: “It’s fair to conclude that the Trudeau Liberals want to limit their leader’s exposure to political peril by curtailing the length of the campaign and depriving the other party leaders of too many occasions to share the stage. That’s a decision made by a one-term incumbent government that sits astride a strong economy and sees itself as a front-runner, but whose leader is vulnerable to attacks related to ethical lapses.”

Andrew Coyne (National Post) on the leaders’ debates: “What we are left with is a position that is every bit as cynical and self-serving as the one that preceded it, only with the added pretence of high principle. If the 2015 debates were a dubious advance over the consortium model, the current approach looks to be a significant step backwards. Harper ended up participating in five debates; Trudeau seems determined to limit his exposure to three.”

Rosemarie Fike (The Globe and Mail) on promoting economic freedom in foreign aid: “Moreover, allowing women the same level of economic freedom as men does not just benefit the female portion of any country’s population, it benefits everyone. A 2014 study by Cuberes and Teiniger estimated that a country loses out on 14 per cent to 15.5 per cent of GDP by not granting women the same levels of economic freedom as men.”

Timothy Garton Ash (The Globe and Mail) on Brexit and democracy: “The Conservative party, a centre-right broad church for at least a century, has become the Revolutionary Conservative Party. Last week, it purged 21 MPs, including Winston Churchill’s grandson and two former chancellors of the exchequer, all of them more entitled to call themselves Conservatives than Mr. Johnson – let alone Dominic Cummings, his Mephistophelean adviser who is not even a member of the party.”

Lise Ravary (Montreal Gazette) on protecting the French language: “I would also like to see measures to solidify the quality of our French. Francophones no longer say ‘tires’ or ‘hood,’ but franglais is creeping back. At the moment, a well-known truck dealership runs radio ads in French in which the word camion is never heard, but rather, ‘les trucks,’ ‘nos trucks,’ ‘vot’ truck,’ and so on. My ears bleed.”

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