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Last week, a U.S. drone killed Iranian General Qassem Soleimani, often referred to as the second most powerful man in Iran.

The fallout from that fatality is only beginning.

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The United States Trump administration says the killing was ordered to prevent worse conflict in the future. But it also warns there will be more to come. President Donald Trump said more military strikes – including against cultural sites – would be on the way if Iran retaliated. And he said the U.S. military would not exit Iraq without extracting money to “pay us back” for what the U.S. had spent on its military campaigns in the country. (The Iraqi parliament voted unanimously on the weekend to kick the U.S. military out of the country.)

Democratic leaders in Congress – which has the sole power to declare war on another country – say they were not given enough advance notice that Mr. Trump had ordered the high-profile slaying. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said her chamber would debate a motion to try to tie Mr. Trump’s hands in the conflict.

In Iran, Gen. Soleimani, who led many of his own brutal campaigns in the region, is being commemorated as a national hero. As a first step in retaliation, the Iranian government abandoned its last commitments from the 2015 nuclear deal, so it could enrich uranium without restrictions.

And in Brussels, NATO Secretary-General Jens Stoltenberg said allies were calling for tempers to cool. “A new conflict would be in no one’s interest,” Mr. Stoltenberg told reporters.

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TODAY’S HEADLINES

The Conservatives will pick a leader to replace Andrew Scheer at a convention in Toronto on June 27. No high-profile candidates have yet formally declared their bids.

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Peter Harder, the Liberal government’s outgoing point person in the Senate, says the Red Chamber needs to do something about the glacial pace of its ethics investigations. A probe into alleged harassment by former senator Don Meredith took four years to be completed.

Diane Ford, mother of Ontario Premier Doug Ford and former Toronto mayor Rob Ford, has died at the age of 85.

In 2019, the most popular fundraisers on GoFundMe directed money to families with kids facing serious medical challenges.

And Tareq Hadhad, a Syrian refugee who came to Canada in 2015 and started a successful chocolate factory in Nova Scotia, says he will get his citizenship this month. “I will be now going everywhere around the world proudly saying that I am Canadian and this is something that I’ve been dreaming about,” Mr. Hadhad said.

John Ibbitson (The Globe and Mail) on Trudeau and the tensions in Iran: “Every minute is dangerous right now. How willing is Justin Trudeau to distance himself from this rogue President’s rash acts against Iran? What price might Canada pay as a result? The Prime Minister’s second term could be shaped by how he handles this crisis.”

Niall Ferguson (The Globe and Mail) on what happens next: “Iran is in dire economic straits, largely because of U.S. sanctions, which the Trump administration tightened last year. The country’s beleaguered rulers gambled that they could force the U.S. to relax sanctions by exerting force, in the belief that Mr. Trump would not risk war in an election year. Wrong. The U.S. may now face pandemonium in Iraq, but Iran will not necessarily be the beneficiary.”

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Elizabeth May (The Globe and Mail) on setting climate targets: “In fact, nearly every province in Canada has cut emissions consistent with the Copenhagen goal. It is only due to increased emissions in Alberta and Saskatchewan that Canada is not on course to meet the cuts promised by the Alberta team in Copenhagen. In fact, as other provinces contracted their emissions, growth in emissions from Saskatchewan and Alberta since 2009 now make those provinces responsible for half of all Canadian fossil fuel pollution.”

Lorrie Goldstein (Toronto Sun) on meeting climate targets: “That’s because Trudeau’s policy isn’t designed to succeed, but to make Canadians feel guilty about using fossil fuel energy, without which life would be impossible in a big, cold, northern, sparsely populated, industrialized country like Canada.”

Lisa Raitt (Policy Options) on whither the Conservative Party: “A warmed-up version of the policies the Conservative government relied on between 2006-2015 did not inspire voters. While it may be asserted that a Conservative government is best able to run the economy and deliver the funding for good public services, that is not enough. The Conservative Party needs to meet the challenges that Canadians are facing head on with Conservative alternatives, not just respond in the negative to what the Liberal government proposes.”

Andrew Coyne (The Globe and Mail) on Trudeau governing with a minority: “Rather, the case for minority governments – the reason we ought to prefer them to majorities, even at the cost of the odd early election or grubby bit of parliamentary horse-trading – is that they are more accountable. Take the current Parliament. Although it has sat for only seven days, it has already accomplished something that would have been unthinkable in the previous Parliament, or the one before that: It voted to strike a special committee to look into Canada’s relationship with China, over the government’s objections.”

Robyn Urback (The Globe and Mail) on punishing drunk driving: “To the family members of the deceased, a prison sentence shorter than the term of a driver’s licence must feel similar to a hideous reflection of the extent to which the justice system values a human life. But when the same behaviour is treated so mildly when it doesn’t get someone killed, the punishment suddenly seems proportional. After all, how could a court justify sending someone to prison for 25 years for driving drunk and killing someone when the maximum punishment for driving drunk without killing someone – a function of luck, mostly – is two years less a day by summary conviction?”

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