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Politics Politics Briefing: Group urges new sanctions against Russians

Good morning,

A group of MPs and human-rights advocates are urging the government to impose new Magnitsky-style sanctions against 16 alleged human-rights abusers in Russia, including President Vladimir Putin. The call follows a dramatic jump in the number of political prisoners being thrown into Russian jails.

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TODAY’S HEADLINES

The federal government is still looking for new fighter jets, particularly ones that are more useful in overseas conflicts than defending the home front, new documents show – leading some in the industry to worry the procurement process is still leaning toward Lockheed Martin’s F-35s.

Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer says he disputes a key finding of the inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous women, namely that the Canadian state has helped perpetuate a genocide against Indigenous people. “It is its own tragedy. It does not fall into the category of genocide,” Mr. Scheer said.

Six premiers have written to Prime Minister Justin Trudeau to say he is “alienating” the provinces with two contentious environmental bills that are nearly at the end of their legislative journey: C-48, concerning a ban on tanker traffic off the B.C. coast, and C-69, which reforms environmental assessments for resource projects.

Alberta Premier Jason Kenney says he is encouraging a consortium of First Nations to buy the Trans Mountain pipeline. Delbert Wapass, executive chairman of the Project Reconciliation group, said that “First Nations in B.C. and elsewhere will realize soon that 51 per cent ownership means that we are in the driver’s seat."

Whales and dolphins will soon no longer be allowed to be kept in captivity for entertainment purposes, under a private member’s bill that will soon receive Royal Assent.

And television star Kiefer Sutherland is asking Ontario Premier Doug Ford to stop comparing himself to Tommy Douglas, a former Saskatchewan premier seen as the figurative father of Canada’s medicare (and Mr. Sutherland’s real-life grandfather).

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Campbell Clark (The Globe and Mail) on Conservative climate change policy: “The oil and gas industry has come up with a hopeful notion that every time Canada exports more natural gas, it could count as a reduction in greenhouse gas emissions – and Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer seemed to approve of the idea on Monday.”

Elisha Corbett (Ottawa Citizen) on how missing and murdered indigenous women are seen: “Historically, Indigenous women and girls have been misrepresented in the media and this representation has resulted in them being viewed as less deserving of our sympathy than other victims of violence.”

Heidi Matthews (Maclean’s) on the inquiry’s finding of genocide: “It is difficult to think of a political and legal strategy that could put truth to the lie of the picture of Canadian liberal tolerance more directly than a finding of genocide. Thinking about Canada’s past and present through the lens of Indigenous genocide questions the foundations of Canadian sovereignty in a way that, until now, the Canadian people and its government have been unwilling to do.”

Diane Bellemare (The Globe and Mail) on the mission of the Bank of Canada: “Following the financial crisis of 2008, monetary policy in Canada has sought to support both job growth and price stability, even though the official mandate of the Bank was solely price stability. If the Bank of Canada is already managing monetary policy to maximize employment and price stability, why not make it official?”

Dan Gardner (The Globe and Mail) on the Liberal government’s ban on single-use plastics: “But in the developed world, most of the waste is properly disposed of, thanks to waste management systems few of us think about or even notice. North America is the source of just 0.9 per cent of the world’s ‘mismanaged’ plastic, meaning plastic that could wind up in the ocean. Almost all our junk ends up in landfills (or incinerators). There are many good reasons to rue this but the state of the oceans isn’t one.”

John Ibbitson (The Globe and Mail) on which party will win the suburbs in this fall’s election: “Electorally, these are the most important ridings in Canada because there are so many of them, because they tend to vote as a block, and because they tend to swing. In every election but one since Pierre Trudeau became prime minister, suburban ridings surrounding Toronto have voted for the party that formed government.”

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