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The House of Commons has a new Speaker: Liberal MP Anthony Rota.

Mr. Rota, from Northern Ontario, beat out former Speaker Geoff Regan and three other candidates for the honour this morning. He will now referee House of Commons debate, cast ballots in the event of a tie vote and get perks that include a farmhouse in the Gatineau Hills.

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Later this afternoon MPs and the public will hear the Liberal government’s Throne Speech. That’s the address at the beginning of each new session of Parliament that lays out the government’s legislative agenda. Governor-General Julie Payette will read the speech in the Senate some time after 3 p.m. ET.

Things will be different for the Liberals now that they only have a minority of seats in the legislature. Liberal House Leader Pablo Rodriguez, though, says he is feeling a spirit of co-operation with the other parties for the upcoming session.

This is the daily Politics Briefing newsletter, written by Chris Hannay. It is available exclusively to our digital subscribers. If you’re reading this on the web, subscribers can sign up for the Politics newsletter and more than 20 others on our newsletter signup page. Have any feedback? Let us know what you think.

TODAY’S HEADLINES

Joe Biden’s campaign to be the Democratic nominee for the presidency released a new ad that features Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and other world leaders appearing to joke about U.S. President Donald Trump behind his back. “The world is laughing at President Trump,” the Biden campaign ad proclaims.

U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said the Democrats will draw up articles of impeachment against Mr. Trump, which will be followed by a vote later in the month.

Back in Canada, the federal government says it will have an action plan to respond to the national inquiry on missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls by next June.

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Environment Minister Jonathan Wilkinson says the Liberal government is working on setting more ambitious greenhouse-gas reduction targets for 2030.

After years of saying Toronto homeowners could not bear higher property taxes, Mayor John Tory says he will levy a major increase in taxes to pay for transit and affordable housing in the city.

The Canada Infrastructure Bank has announced its seventh official project, contributing up to $300-million to an expansion of the Port of Montreal.

And B.C.'s Seniors Advocate says the federal government’s promise that patient care would not be affected by a Chinese company’s purchase of a chain of retirement homes has come to nothing. Three of the homes were recently placed on outside administration because of concerns about how residents were treated. The federal government had approved the chain’s sale to China’s Anbang in 2017. “We do not have a robust and reliable, open and transparent process to reassure the public, the family members and the residents that the care hours that are being funded … are actually being delivered,” Isobel Mackenzie said.

Campbell Clark (The Globe and Mail) on Trudeau’s not-so-private comments about Trump: “All foreign leaders are two-faced with Mr. Trump. He practically demands it. He threatens and bullies, but transparently craves praise no matter how insincere. The obvious tactic for any leader is to pump his ego face to face and roll your eyes when he leaves the room.”

Robyn Urback (The Globe and Mail): “In normal times, with a normal president, Mr. Trudeau’s extremely rookie move of getting caught on camera badmouthing a fellow leader would begin and end with the Prime Minister’s embarrassment. Indeed, this behaviour is unfortunately part and parcel of what we have come to expect from Mr. Trudeau when he travels abroad.”

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Lawrence Martin (The Globe and Mail): “Mr. Trudeau has to be careful with any temptation he may have to lash back. He needs Mr. Trump’s help in the continuing feud with China on the Meng affair, which still sees two Canadians being held in Beijing. The new NAFTA, the USMCA, is still in the process of being ratified by Congress. Even if that goes through, the President could strike Ottawa on the trade front in other ways.”

Marni Soupcoff (National Post): “The ‘us’ who will see the effects of any bad feeling Trudeau has created are Canadians with no say in any of this, such as the 23-year-old public-interest lawyer trying to start her career in Washington, D.C., because she hasn’t been able to find an articling position in Canada after spending thousands of dollars on her Canadian law degree – and who has a legitimate claim for a NAFTA work visa but encounters a U.S. border officer who isn’t inclined to hear her out.

Brigitte Pellerin (Ottawa Citizen) on changes to the plaque marking the Polytechnique shootings: “It took three decades to call the Polytechnique massacre by its name: a crime against feminism. Thirty years to get to the first step. During all this time, the commemorative plaque at the Place du 6-décembre-1989 mentioned ‘un événement tragique,’ a tragic event. The 2019 version, ‘Attentat antiféministe,’ now properly honours the memory of the 14 assassinated women. For decades, people had resisted using the proper words, despite all evidence to the contrary, because, well, honestly I don’t really know why. I have my theory, and it makes me angry, so instead I will focus on the fact that we eventually got it right.”

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