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The finish line is in sight in Alberta’s provincial election campaign – and the latest polls have Jason Kenney and the United Conservative Party leading the pack.

A new poll, conducted Saturday by Nanos Research for The Globe and Mail, found 44 per cent of decided or leaning respondents identified the UCP as their top choice. Meanwhile, 36 per cent said they would vote for Rachel Notley’s incumbent New Democrats, and 16 per cent said they were undecided. The Alberta Party, which is seeking a breakthrough under the leadership of Stephen Mandel, a former Edmonton mayor, had the support of 12 per cent of respondents.

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Pollster Nik Nanos said the poll results put Mr. Kenney on the path for victory.

“I would call it a comfortable lead,” said Mr. Nanos. “The current trajectory suggests a win [for Mr. Kenney].”

On the question of who would make the best premier, Mr. Kenney and Ms. Notley were effectively tied given the poll’s margin of error, with 37-per-cent and 35-per-cent support, respectively.

Ms. Notley launched an attack on the integrity of the United Conservative’s Jason Kenney at a raucous rally in Calgary on Saturday.

“We’ve made sure Albertans know exactly who Jason Kenney is and we’ve made sure they know the risk that he presents to Calgary because those risks are real,” Ms. Notley said.

Campaigns compared: Where the NDP and UCP stand on everything from child care to carbon taxes.

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TODAY’S HEADLINES

Jane Philpott is assessing her political options after being told she is not wanted as a Liberal and says she could run as a candidate for the New Democrats or the Greens, or even as an independent, in the election next fall.

Justin Trudeau’s Liberals say they are still hearing support from Indigenous people and leaders, despite concerns raised publicly about Mr. Trudeau’s expulsion of two ex-ministers who had been central to work on reconciliation.

Mr. Trudeau touted the strength and contributions of Canada’s Sikh community as he celebrated the religion’s holy day of Vaisakhi in Vancouver.

A coalition of federal, provincial and municipal politicians added their voices to those opposing Quebec’s proposed secularism bill.

Dozens of non-governmental organizations are urging the Trudeau government to make renewed, long-term investments in the health and rights of women and children around the world before Canadian foreign-aid funding for the sector runs out next year.

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Brand-name drug companies could put off introducing new medicine in Canada and scale back research here if the country makes a major shift to cheaper generic alternatives under a national pharmacare plan, according to an internal federal analysis.

As Fort William First Nation confronts its usual challenges at election time, it is also grappling with a more fundamental problem: how a system of government that was designed to control and assimilate the community near Thunder Bay can be used to improve its lot and preserve its identity instead.

Ontario Premier Doug Ford is still raising money through his Progressive Conservative leadership campaign – despite having no debt from his successful bid – and has taken in more than half a million dollars that will be transferred to the party.

Campbell Clark (The Globe and Mail) on the Ontario budget: “Mr. Ford’s budget hasn’t shown Ontarians a harsh, austere face. Mr. Trudeau’s team had hoped that’s what Canadian voters would see, and that they’d worry that the same face is behind Mr. Scheer’s smile. Now they’ll have to fight Mr. Scheer without Mr. Ford’s help.”

The Globe and Mail Editorial Board on immigration: “Canada needs immigrants. Canada needs secure borders. These may sound like contradictory claims; they are not. They go hand-in-hand. Over the past couple of weeks, the Trudeau Liberals have abruptly woken up to this reality. ”

Lawrence Martin (The Globe and Mail) on changes to U.S. President Donald Trump’s team: “If Mr. Trump was headstrong and rash before, be prepared for worse to come. There will only be a tightening of the screws from here to election day.”

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David Shribman (The Globe and Mail) on the U.S. presidential race: “Does Washington experience – or other political experience – really matter, in seeking the American presidency or in actually being the American President?”

Andrew Coyne (National Post) on asylum seekers: “What is wrong about the new Liberal policy is not that it is hypocritical, but simply that it is wrong: arbitrary, inhumane, and vastly unnecessary.”

Chris Hall (CBC News) on the Alberta election: “the likely ballot box question on Tuesday: Which leader — Notley or Kenney — is better equipped to resuscitate the oil and gas sector, to get people working again now?”

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