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The crackdown on the Canada Emergency Response Benefit will begin soon. The Liberal government is preparing to table legislation on Wednesday that would set out fine and prison sentences for those found to be fraudulently claiming the $2,000-per-month federal payments.

The benefit was introduced to help those who have lost their jobs because of the COVID-19 pandemic. The take-up of the program has been big: As of June 4, the government had poured out $43.5-billion in CERB payments.

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TODAY’S HEADLINES

The federal government said it will soon unveil a “limited exemption” to Canada’s closed border, so families can be reunited. Immediate family members of citizens or permanent residents will be allowed to come to Canada.

As protests against police brutality continued, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau suggested he was supportive of body cameras and that he would bring up the topic at a discussion with premiers later this week.

Toronto Police Chief Mark Saunders is stepping down.

Researchers say lockdowns – while painful economically and psychologically – have successfully held back the spread of the novel coronavirus. Two studies on the topic were published in Nature today.

Many regions of Ontario will have their lockdowns loosened as of Friday (sorry Toronto, Windsor and Niagara – you’re not included yet). And all Ontarians will be allowed to gather in groups of 10, up from 5. The province also announced a temporary ban on commercial evictions.

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The federal government tapped the controversial-but-seldom-used Canada Account to extend a $650-million lifeline to General Dynamics Land Systems Canada, the company producing light-armoured vehicles for Saudi Arabia.

Debra Thompson (The Globe and Mail) on racism in Canada and the United States: “The kind of belonging I always wanted in Canada, I found in the U.S. I know some might think that the kind of racism that exists in Canada – in my opinion, more insidious, harder to name and therefore challenge, and always operating under the cloud of plausible deniability – is somehow better than the in-your-face racism of the U.S. But I’ve experienced both, and I’d rather face the enemy that can at least be named than the one Canadians deny even exists. And no one has asked where I’m ‘really’ from in 10 years.”

Doug Cuthand (Regina Leader-Post) on what happened here: “The story of the Indigenous people is one of neglect and genocide. If we didn’t sign treaty and take reserve land, we were starved into submission. The government wanted to settle the West and we were considered an impediment to settlement. We were colonized by the churches and the federal government. Colonialism is also racism.”

Justin Ling (The Globe and Mail) on policing and the lack of data: “Policing in this country, like so many aspects of the state, is needlessly opaque. The U.S.'s levers and tools to ensure at least some level of transparency – if not accountability – are either woefully inadequate in Canada, or do not exist at all.”

Campbell Clark (The Globe and Mail) on what Trudeau can do after the symbolic gestures: “He can demand standards of accountability for incidents that involve the use of force, and that they be reviewed independently. He can fix the broken complaints system for the RCMP – a small reform is already proposed in legislation before Parliament. He can demand that the collection, and publication, of statistics on arrests and charges be disaggregated by ethnic background.”

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