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Friday’s deadline for a North American free-trade agreement deal came and went without a deal. And now that negotiators have had a Labour Day long weekend to regroup, they are set to get back at it tomorrow. The sticking point appears to still be Chapter 19, a dispute-resolution mechanism that allows countries to challenge each other’s punitive duties. Canadian officials say they are open to weakening the chapter if need be, but the U.S. is, so far, intent on eliminating it entirely. Here’s more on how Chapter 19 works and why Canada thinks it’s important.

This is the daily Politics Briefing newsletter, written by Chris Hannay in Ottawa and James Keller in Vancouver. If you’re reading this on the web or someone forwarded this e-mail newsletter to you, you can sign up for Politics Briefing and all Globe newsletters here. Have any feedback? Let us know what you think.

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TODAY’S HEADLINES

The day the National Gallery’s sale of a Marc Chagall painting become public earlier this year, a federal panel of art experts wrote to the then-heritage minister to express their concerns that the work of art was even allowed to leave Canada’s borders. The work of this panel – the Canadian Cultural Property Export Review Board – has been under scrutiny this summer after a court ruling that upended how Canada’s cultural property rules worked.

Seventeen per cent of Canadians are open and 70 per cent are closed to the possibility of a new Maxime Bernier-led small-c conservative party, a Nanos Research poll for the Globe suggests.

Thinning out the forests. New building codes. Bans on development. Prescribed burns. The Globe’s Tamsin McMahon looks what governments should do to prevent the destructive wildfire seasons in British Columbia and California. There’s a lot of blame to go around.

The court ruling that has put the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion into doubt dimmed the hopes of many in Alberta, where businesses and workers in the oil patch were pinning their homes on a long-awaited economic recovery on the project. Oil prices have strengthened and corporate earnings and consumer spending had improved, but to many Albertans, those gains now seem fleeting. The House of Commons' natural resources committee is holding an emergency meeting today at noon to talk about Trans Mountain.

In Alberta, the political fight in the classrooms is about how kids learn about fossil fuels.

A lawyer for a family in Vancouver that owns a number of notorious low-income hotels say the city’s attempt to expropriate two properties is “draconian" and that local officials haven’t acted in good faith. A lawyer for the Sahota family, whose record of violations was documented in a Globe and Mail investigation, has filed a challenge of the expropriation attempt.

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Gang violence and transit are driving the debate ahead of a municipal election in Surrey, B.C.'s second-largest city. The Globe’s Frances Bula examines how a fractured landscape could remake the local government and leave a city council with a list of new political parties.

And in what some are calling yet another dark day for Myanmar’s democracy, two Reuters journalists have been sentenced to jail for seven years for reporting on the country’s brutal treatment of Rohingya people. " We know what we did. We know we did nothing wrong. I have no fear. I believe in justice, democracy and freedom," reporter Wa Lone said after the sentencing.

John Ibbitson (The Globe and Mail) on Prime Minister Justin Trudeau: “The hammer blows of last week have left the Trudeau government vulnerable on four fronts. A win later this month at the North American free-trade talks would go a long way to repairing the damage. But if those talks fail, the Liberals will be challenged to win the next election, a prospect that seemed unlikely mere months ago.”

Margaret Wente (The Globe and Mail) on wildfires: “The trouble is that proper forest management is extremely expensive. No one has the budget, and no one wants to pay the price to do it right. And everybody wants to pass the buck.”

Prajwala Dixit (CBC) on citizenship: “Elimination of birthright citizenship risks creating stateless children not only legally, but emotionally. We all yearn for a place to call ‘home.’ To belong. A Canadian birth certificate isn’t simply a piece of paper: it is confirmation that you are part of something; you are accepted.”

Chris Selley (National Post) on free speech on campus: “Turning to any government for help with free speech where universities falter is just silly. It further politicizes what ought to be a bedrock concept of Western democracy, for starters.”

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Derek Burney (The Globe and Mail) on NAFTA: “Unfortunately, and despite rhetorical assurances, Mexico deserted Canada at the 11th hour on this key issue even though it is similarly vulnerable. Each country has to ultimately act in its own best interest in trade negotiations without relying on elusive goodwill among partners.”

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