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Indigenous Services Minister Marc Miller says he is open to meeting the Mohawks of Tyendinaga, but on one condition: they end a protest that has ground rail transportation to a halt in Ontario.

The protests on the rail line in eastern Ontario have stopped passenger and freight cars. The demonstrations are being held in solidarity with members of the Wet’suwet’en Nation, who are protesting the construction of the Coastal GasLink pipeline in Northern B.C. Two hereditary chiefs from that First Nation have now launched a lawsuit against the federal government.

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“As you well know, this is a highly volatile situation and the safety of all involved is of the utmost importance to me," Mr. Miller said in a public letter. "I hope you will agree to this request and that we can meet in the spirit of peace and cooperation that should guide our relationship.”

The Mohawks have not yet said if they will acquiesce to the request.

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TODAY’S HEADLINES

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s international tour continues. Today he was in Senegal where, he said, he pressed the country’s leadership to stop criminalizing people who are LGBTQ. Senegalese President Macky Sall said that’s not happening. “It is our way of living and being. It has nothing to do with homophobia,” Mr. Sall claimed.

Quebec giant Bombardier Inc. is pulling out of its deal with Airbus, ending the company’s big play into commercial aerospace.

Toronto lawyer Leslyn Lewis is officially the third candidate in the race for the Conservative leadership. The long-time volunteer ran unsuccessfully in a Scarborough riding in the 2015 election. Ms. Lewis, who is backed by the Campaign Life Coalition, said in her official statement that she sees “opportunities for future generations falling away and I see our values being undermined – even within our own Party.”

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British Prime Minister Boris Johnson has shuffled his cabinet, just weeks after guiding Brexit and winning an election.

The city council of Markham, Ont., voted down a proposal to ban the flying of foreign flags at city hall. Some had raised concerns about flying the Chinese flag, given the current geopolitical tensions. “I am very proud to say that Huawei Technologies has their Canadian head office here in our community with more than 700 employees, over 500 of them in research and development,” Markham Mayor Frank Scarpitti said.

And the CEO of the Alberta government’s energy war room has apologized for attacks on The New York Times. The Canadian Energy Centre criticized a piece The New York Times wrote about the Alberta oil sands and, in the process, brought up the years-old Jayson Blair plagiarism scandal and suggested the news outlet was antisemitic.

Gary Mason (The Globe and Mail) on B.C. Premier John Horgan and the Wet’suwet’en protests: “Footage of Indigenous elders being carted off to jail never looks good, but it wouldn’t be the first time, nor is it likely to be the last. In this dispute, Mr. Horgan has a pretty formidable asset on his side – the 20 First Nations along the route of the pipeline that support the project. Construction delays hurt them as much as anyone.”

Andrew MacDougall (Ottawa Citizen) on where Trudeau has been: “The prime minister is certainly not in control of the agenda. While #ShutDownCanada activists have been busy paralyzing legislatures, bridges and railways across Canada in protest of British Columbia’s Coastal GasLink pipeline, Trudeau has been overseas shelling out money in search of support for Canada’s United Nations Security Council bid. Trudeau has apparently decided that a temporary seat at the end of an increasingly ineffective table is a better use of his time than taking his country off the boil.”

Eric Reguly (The Globe and Mai) on the collapse of Bombardier: “Bombardier’s survival in some form is possible, perhaps likely, but is far from assured. What is assured is that, at best, it will be small and inglorious compared with its former self, when it was emerging as a global rival to Airbus and Boeing and one of the world’s top rail players. One of Canada’s last great family dynasties messed up – big time.”

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Valérie Pelletier (Montreal Gazette) on sex work: “There is no good prostitution. Nobody should have to have sexual contact with people whom they don’t desire, to earn money. There is no such thing as a special class of women who must be relegated to this function in society.”

David Parkinson (The Globe and Mail) on Muskratt Falls: “Danny Williams staked his political legacy on getting the Muskrat Falls hydroelectric project built. Dwight Ball is staking his own on making sure Newfoundland and Labrador voters don’t have to pay a cent for Danny Williams’s hubris. In doing so, Premier Ball may be mortgaging the province’s future to pay for its past.”

Cathal Kelly (The Globe and Mail) on the passing of veteran columnist Christie Blatchford: “Blatch was old school. She was a broad in the Lauren Bacall sense. She was tough, maudlin, brilliant, ruthless, kind, changeable. She was all the things a human can be. All of us are works in progress, but Blatch was somehow closer to being finished.”

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