Skip to main content

Politics Politics Briefing: Politicians celebrate Raptors’ historic win

Good morning,

The Toronto Raptors have done what no other Canadian team has done in 26 years, though many hockey teams have tried: The Raptors won a major league sports championship.

Political leaders in Ottawa were watching, of course. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau tweeted a picture of him watching the game at home with two of his children, and when the Raptors won he said: “And that’s how we do it in the North."

Story continues below advertisement

Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer tweeted: “A game we’ll always remember. Way to go @Raptors! Fans all across Canada are celebrating this historic win tonight. For the first time in @NBA history, the Larry O’Brien Trophy will go where basketball began: Canada!” (If you don’t don’t know that bit of historical trivia, have I got a Heritage Minute for you.)

NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh knew there was a lot of celebrating left to be done: “#WeTheNorth and now We The Champions!!! 🏆🏆 Congrats to the @Raptors on making history tonight – and thanks for bringing an entire country along for this wild ride. When’s the parade?? 😃”

And, if you stayed up late to watch the game and you can barely get out of bed this morning, don’t worry – when asked if Canadians had the day off today because of the Raptors win, Mr. Trudeau’s chief spokeswoman Kate Purchase tweeted: “Confirmed.”

This is the daily Politics Briefing newsletter, written by Chris Hannay. It is available exclusively to our digital subscribers. If you’re reading this on the web, subscribers can sign up for the Politics newsletter and more than 20 others on our newsletter signup page.

Editor’s note: The 2019 election is coming up this fall, and we’d like to know what you’d like to see in the Politics Briefing during the campaign. Do you want more exclusive content about who’s working on the campaign? More on what’s happening in local ridings across the country? A different time during the day that the newsletter hits your inbox? Let us know what you want to see.

TODAY’S HEADLINES

Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland is dismissing an idea floated by former prime minister Jean Chrétien that the government should cancel the extradition proceedings against Huawei executive Meng Wanzhou. “It would be a very dangerous precedent indeed for Canada to alter its behaviour when it comes to honouring an extradition treaty in response to external pressure,” Ms. Freeland said, referring to the pressure China has put on Canada to release Ms. Meng.

Story continues below advertisement

The Liberal government said its carbon tax will not go higher than $50 a tonne. The Liberals had left the door open before to letting the price on emissions continue to rise past 2022. The carbon-pricing regime is set to cover Alberta on Jan. 1 after Premier Jason Kenney cancelled the province’s own carbon tax.

The House of Commons supported a Liberal MP’s motion to vow to end homelessness among veterans by 2025.

Former interim Conservative leader Rona Ambrose is calling out Tory senators for refusing to pass her bill to mandate sexual-assault education for judges.

A Liberal MP from B.C., Joe Peschisolido, says his government should address the immigration issue of so-called “birth tourism,” when non-Canadian mothers travel to Canada to give birth.

Six Nations of the Grand River, Canada’s largest First Nation, is concerned that recent Liberal legislation will mean an influx of new members – something the community would like to curb.

And a Globe and Mail analysis shows money the Ontario Progressive Conservative government gave to rural communities went disproportionately to ridings represented by their own MPPs.

Story continues below advertisement

Denise Balkissoon (The Globe and Mail) on reading the report of the inquiry into missing and murdered indigenous women: “What I do have an opinion on are the reasons behind the rush to undermine those findings. Those include guilt about the undeniable cruelty and indifference with which this country treats Indigenous people. There’s also fear about how Canadian lives might change if the government honoured the many treaties signed by this Crown and the one before it. Imagine this, though: Some things could get better. If Indigenous women were safer, other women would be, too.”

Campbell Clark (The Globe and Mail) on the proposal to drop the extradition process against a Huawei executive: “More bluntly, it’s a bad precedent to cave in to Chinese bullying, including taking Canadians Michael Kovrig and Michael Spavor hostage, and abandon the important extradition treaty with the United States.”

Roy Fox (The Globe and Mail) on the Liberals’ environmental legislation: “Respecting Indigenous rights, which includes the government’s duty to consult, has been described as an important part of Bill C-69. Consultation is not about persuading First Nations to do your will, but to learn from our perspectives and accommodate our concerns. It is my perspective that, when drafting Bills C-48 and C-69, the Liberals chose to listen only to those Indigenous peoples who shared their ideology.”

Danielle Smith (Edmonton Journal) on Alberta’s solutions to reduce emissions: “Canada could become a leading liquid natural gas exporter displacing the use of coal internationally and further reduce global greenhouse gas emissions. As the world population grows to nine billion people by 2050, zero-emissions natural gas offers the best hope that everyone on the planet could achieve the same standard of living we already enjoy, without increasing emissions. That is the best possible future.”

Don Martin (CTV) on the need for a Conservative climate plan: “If the Conservative green scheme is simply rooted in tax credits for companies exporting clean technology around the world, that will rightly be seen as a weasel way of doing not much, particularly if the receiving country doesn’t agree with the plan.”

Got a news tip that you’d like us to look into? E-mail us at tips@globeandmail.com. Need to share documents securely? Reach out via SecureDrop

Report an error Editorial code of conduct
Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Discussion loading ...

Cannabis pro newsletter