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Good morning,

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has some big decisions to make over the weekend as he prepares to unveil a new cabinet on Monday. The team of ministers will be the ones that Mr. Trudeau takes into the next election. They’ll get their first chance to work together at a cabinet retreat next week in Sherbrooke, Que.

The shuffle was, partly, precipitated by the decision of Treasury Board President Scott Brison to step down after 22 years in politics. Mr. Brison, who represents a riding in rural Nova Scotia, started out as a Progressive Conservative, but jumped to the Liberals in 2003 when the PCs merged with the Canadian Alliance to form the Conservative Party. Mr. Brison was a cabinet minister in the short-lived Paul Martin government, before spending nearly a decade on the opposition benches. He was elevated to a position as one of Mr. Trudeau’s senior economic ministers when the Liberals won power again in 2015.

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This is the daily Politics Briefing newsletter, written by Chris Hannay in Ottawa. It is available exclusively to our digital subscribers. If you’re reading this on the web, subscribers can sign up for the Politics newsletter and more than 20 others on our newsletter signup page. Have any feedback? Let us know what you think.

TODAY’S HEADLINES

Members of the Wet’suwet’en Nation blocking access to the site of a proposed natural-gas pipeline in northern B.C. say they remain opposed to the project, but will allow the company building it to have some access to the area.

The National Energy Board released new guidelines for the protection of marine areas around a proposed expansion of the Trans Mountain pipeline in B.C. The NEB did not say whether the project should go ahead, instead advising on reducing the environmental impacts.

Scientists say oceans are warming at an alarming rate due to climate change. “Global warming is here, and has major consequences already. There is no doubt, none!” wrote the authors of a report in the journal Science.

Mr. Trudeau got an earful at a town hall in Regina.

Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland blasted Venezuela’s Nicolas Maduro, who won power again through a disputed election. “The suffering of Venezuelans will only worsen should he continue to illegitimately cling to power,” Ms. Freeland said.

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A delegation of Canadian officials was among the targets of a thwarted terror attack in Israel.

Many Canadians who acquired hepatitis C because of tainted blood are still waiting for compensation from the government.

And the Art Gallery of Ontario says it will part with 20 works by the Group of Seven’s A.Y. Jackson to make more space on its walls for underrepresented artists. “This allows us to redress historical gaps and better reflect the people who live here,” chief curator Julian Cox said.

John Ibbitson (The Globe and Mail) on Scott Brison’s exit from politics: “His departure only makes it more likely, as we await Monday’s cabinet shuffle, that grand and unaffordable new spending commitments – a national pharmacare program! a guaranteed basic income! – lie ahead.”

Linda Nazareth (The Globe and Mail) on another recession: “What if you had a recession and workers got hit hard but the unemployment rate hardly changed at all? Strange as it sounds, it is a real possibility. Given the transitions we are seeing in terms of jobs, the next recession could play out very differently than past ones. That is something worth thinking about as we face a year of economic uncertainty.”

Andray Domise (Maclean’s) on the political left’s problem with outrage: “From an outsider’s perspective, the discourse of the online left can look something like a digital struggle session. In any given week, a celebrity’s transgression in language, inoffensive outside of the internet’s panic machine, will be pulled out of context, drummed up on social media and used to administer a flogging in the news cycle. Or a college athlete will be ‘held accountable’ for shockingly offensive social-media posts made before they were even old enough to drive, let alone old enough to fully grasp the hurtfulness of what they’d said. Each new day brings the rising of the sun, the falling of the tide and something new for us to be mad about.”

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Andrew MacDougall (Maclean’s) on the Conservatives' strategy in the next election: “Scheer’s doubling down on ‘tough on crime’ isn’t what you’d call a bold move. There’s playing it safe and then there’s binding yourself in bubble wrap and never leaving your home, as Scheer has done. Then again, A Safer Canada™ might only be electoral foreplay; some action designed to get the blood pumping among his troops. Let’s hope so, because on its own, it certainly isn’t enough to whack Justin Trudeau out of office.”

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