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Hello,

A group of 19 high-profile Canadians who used to hold political or diplomatic office say the Liberal government must intervene in Meng Wanzhou’s extradition hearings. The Chinese government says that if the intervention happens, it may release two Canadians it has held for more than a year.

And Justin Trudeau? He says no way.

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“The bigger question is whether or not we want China or other countries to get the message that all they have to do to get leverage over the Canadian government is randomly arrest a couple of Canadians,” the Prime Minister told reporters at his daily news conference this morning.

The extradition process against Ms. Meng, an executive at Chinese telecom giant Huawei, is scheduled to resume in August, but may drag on for years. Ms. Meng is wanted in the U.S. on charges of fraud related to sanctions against Iran.

This is the daily Politics Briefing newsletter, written by Chris Hannay. It is available exclusively to our digital subscribers. If you’re reading this on the web, subscribers can sign up for the Politics newsletter and more than 20 others on our newsletter signup page. Have any feedback? Let us know what you think.

TODAY’S HEADLINES

Indigenous leaders and MPs from all parties are criticizing RCMP Commissioner Brenda Lucki for her testimony at a parliamentary committee hearing on systemic racism in the police force. “If she can’t identify systemic racism within the RCMP, then she can’t lead it,” Nishnawbe Aski Nation Grand Chief Alvin Fiddler said.

Paul Bunner, a current speechwriter for Alberta Premier Jason Kenney, is under fire for claiming that residential schools were not that bad. Mr. Bunner was a writer for then-prime minister Stephen Harper when he delivered an official apology on behalf of the government for the abuse that Indigenous children faced at those schools.

Ontario has eased its rules for monitoring COVID-19 on farms, which have suffered outbreaks among workers who are mostly temporary foreign workers. Now asymptomatic workers who test positive for the virus can still be on the job, provided they stay in groups of other people who already have it too.

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Infectious-disease experts are pushing back on suggestions by the tourism industry to allow travel to resume.

Canadians may be exempt from the U.S. work-visa ban, lawyers suggest.

And Fitch downgraded Canada’s credit rating, citing concerns about deficits caused by pandemic emergency spending.

Richard Fadden (The Globe and Mail) on why the government should not intervene in Meng Wanzhou’s extradition case: “The detention of our two fellow citizens is nothing less than a large and powerful state attempting to bully a middle power, which is without a great deal of cover from its allies. If we surrender to this pressure, we will be sending a message to Beijing that such tactics work, and we thereby endanger other Canadians or Canadian economic interests whenever a significant dispute arises between our two countries. This cannot be in our long-term interest.”

Lawrence Martin (The Globe and Mail) on what Jean Chrétien would have done: “Mr. Trump has said he could use the Meng case as a bargaining chip if necessary in trade negotiations with China. I got the impression from Mr. Chrétien, who is busy writing another book on his experiences, that he would rather have Canada be the one to use the Meng case as a bargaining chip than Washington or Beijing.”

Sonia Baxendale (The Globe and Mail) on increasing diversity in Corporate Canada: “We do know though that as more women have joined boards and taken on leadership roles the discussion of gender has become more prominent and more women see what is possible to aspire to. This is needed for Indigenous and Black people along with others disadvantaged by systemic racism. Yet as we made progress on gender equality, we were short-sighted by not putting more emphasis on racial diversity in the past. Now we have a lot of catching up to do.”

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Devon Platana (Ottawa Citizen) on Black identity: “Whether their words were intentionally racist or not, it’s time people like that were educated. Just because someone doesn’t look like your stereotypical image of what ‘being Black’ is doesn’t give you permission to devalue them or their experience.”

Got a news tip that you’d like us to look into? E-mail us at tips@globeandmail.com. Need to share documents securely? Reach out via SecureDrop

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