Skip to main content

Politics Politics Briefing: Trudeau wants to solve Canada’s plastic problem

Good morning,

For most of us who live in cities, you pack your garbage into black bags, sort the recycling into the papers and the plastics, put the items at the curb side and never give it a second thought.

That recycling, though, is beginning to become a serious public policy issue (if not a diplomatic one), especially as China moves to refuse much of the recyclable refuse Canadian companies were shipping its way and more and more items make their way into landfills. (Read this Globe investigation for more on the pressures facing Canada’s recycling industry.)

Story continues below advertisement

The federal Liberals, whose first (and possibly only) term in government is winding down, are expected to announce today the first step in tackling this plastic-and-paper-packaging problem. No specific single-use items are expected to be banned today, but future items could include plastic straws or coffee cups – meaning it might be time to stock up on those travel mugs.

This is the daily Politics Briefing newsletter, written by Chris Hannay. It is available exclusively to our digital subscribers. If you’re reading this on the web, subscribers can sign up for the Politics newsletter and more than 20 others on our newsletter signup page. Have any feedback? Let us know what you think.

TODAY’S HEADLINES

The military launched a zero-tolerance policy against sexual assaults in its ranks in 2015, but since then soldiers charged and tried in military courts have been acquitted at much higher rates than those tried in civilian courts. The new research by law professor Elaine Craig found that, often, soldiers alleged to have committed violent sex crimes were able to plead down to minor offences.

Nearly 100 law professors and lawyers say the Liberal government’s bill to reform solitary confinement is unconstitutional. The bill is currently at report stage in the Senate.

Today Facebook is launching a new searchable database of the political advertising bought on its platforms by political parties and other groups. There are also measures, required by a new law, to make it more difficult for foreign groups to buy ads in Canada.

Oil stocks, briefly buoyed by the return of a conservative government in Alberta, appear to be dropping again because of investor anxiety.

Story continues below advertisement

Former prime minister Jean Chretien says he is prepared to travel to China to act as an envoy for the Canadian government, if it would help free two Canadians and ease tensions between the countries.

And if you’re watching Game 5 of the NBA finals tonight, expect lots of TV ads about Andrew Scheer: both positive spots paid for by the Conservative Party and attack ads bought by a third-party group called Engage Canada.

David Moscrop (The Globe and Mail) on the first year of Ontario Premier Doug Ford: “Year one has seen a chaotic, destructive and unpopular run of policy lurch, and a governing style that has been haphazard, unprofessional and nasty – though it’s not really clear what else Ontarians expected from Mr. Ford.”

Adam Radwanski (The Globe and Mail) on the Ontario Liberal leadership: “Coming out of the provincial Liberals’ annual general meeting this weekend, [Steven] Del Duca has to be considered the odds-on favourite to win their leadership next March.”

Shachi Kurl (Ottawa Citizen) on voters’ second choices: “The Conservatives, under Andrew Scheer, can take a little more comfort in this long observed truth about Canadian politics: the CPC has the most committed base. How committed? Consider that their voters are more than twice as likely as Liberal and NDP supporters to say they have no second choice.”

Daphne Bramham (Vancouver Sun) on gender equality: “But it’s not only reproductive rights that are under attack. Unless there is radical change, no countries — not even France and Canada — will meet the commitments made 24 years ago when 189 countries signed on to the UN’s Beijing Declaration supporting women’s empowerment.”

Story continues below advertisement

David Curtis Wright (The Globe and Mail) on Canada caught between China and the U.S.: “Thanks a lot, Cold War 2.0 superpowers, for this binary bombshell you have dropped on Canada. What knots will you untie for us?”

Got a news tip that you’d like us to look into? E-mail us at tips@globeandmail.com. Need to share documents securely? Reach out via SecureDrop

Report an error Editorial code of conduct
Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Discussion loading ...

Cannabis pro newsletter