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An advocacy group pushing for justice system reforms to help the wrongly convicted will be making an announcement today in Toronto.

Innocence Canada says two of the country’s major federal parties have committed to creating a special tribunal to investigate wrongful convictions.

‘This can happen to you.’ David Milgaard works to help free other innocent people – even though it opens the wounds of his past

The organization did not say which parties have made the pledge, but the Liberals have previously announced they would do so if re-elected.

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Innocence Canada says a tribunal would replace the current system in which a person must convince the federal justice minister that they’ve been wrongfully convicted.

Such a tribunal has been recommended in at least five public inquiries since 1989.

Today’s news conference will take place at noon and will feature David Milgaard and Ronald Dalton, two men who served long prison sentences for murders they didn’t commit.

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