Skip to main content

Home of the Week, 51 Roxborough Dr., Toronto. Home of Lawrence and Mary Wolf. Now for sale with an asking price of $6.5-million.

Colin Faulkner

1 of 8

Lawrence and Mary Wolf knew they were challenging convention when they commissioned a house of glass and steel. They didn’t know they would be living in an architectural landmark. The Wolf House, built on stilts facing a Rosedale ravine in 1974, has won many awards and international acclaim for architect Barton Myers.

Colin Faulkner

2 of 8

Mr. Myers’s creation remains substantially the same, but the Wolfs have made some changes to the interior over the years. Because the house was built on stilts, the Wolfs were able to slide a glass box underneath to create a garden-level living room in 1983. A home office on the same level can be enclosed behind panels or opened up to views of the garden.

Colin Faulkner

3 of 8

On the upper level, the kids’ area at the front of the house has been reconfigured to create a guest bedroom and a home office.

Colin Faulkner

4 of 8

Story continues below advertisement

In 2008, New York-based Heather Faulding of Faulding Architecture was brought in to reconfigure the kitchen and redesign the glass living room. The original galley kitchen was inspired by Mr. Myers’s time in the navy, Ms. Wolf says. That vision translated into a very industrial look. Outside, the landscaping surrounding the inground swimming pool was designed by Walter Kehm to take advantage of the ravine and rolling terrain.

Colin Faulkner

5 of 8

At the rear, the master bedroom was transformed by interior design firm Yabu Pushelberg. Warm wood furniture built-ins define the space. A new ensuite bathroom features dramatic gold leaf tiles and an oval freestanding tub with views of the ravine through floor-to-ceiling windows.

Colin Faulkner

6 of 8

‘This is the most glorious dining room in all of Toronto,’ says Mr. Wolf.

Colin Faulkner

7 of 8

The Wolfs feel very fortunate to live on the edge of a ravine. With his design, they say, Mr. Myers was almost able to incorporate the exterior into the interior. ‘We had this incredible lot. We wanted to take advantage of it.’

Colin Faulkner

8 of 8

Report an error Editorial code of conduct
Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Discussion loading ...