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The Daniels Corp. is transforming a whole block across from Sugar Beach to a mixed-used development with condo towers, office space and retail.

Lighthouse Tower at Daniels Waterfront – City of the Arts

Builder/developer The Daniels Corp.

Size 349 to 2,394 square feet

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Price From $246,900 to more than $1-million

Sales centre 162 Queens Quay E., at Richardson Street. Open Monday to Thursday from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m.; weekends and holidays from noon to 6 p.m.

Contact: Phone 416-221-3939 or visit danielswaterfront.com

The Daniels Corp. has launched the first phase of its arts-themed high-rise community on the Toronto Waterfront, surrounding the project with a cornucopia of cultural amenities.

The mixed-use development on the site of the old Guvernment nightclub and music venue will give residents exclusive access to artist talks, gallery tours, workshops and screenings held by local arts organizations, such as TIFF, NXNE and Artscape.

"When you think about what makes life great to live in downtown, it's not just how nice your residence is, but everything that's around you," says Dominic Tompa, broker of record for City Life Realty, which is owned by Daniels.

"When people think of entertainment, it's arts, it's movies and it's restaurants – it's all of that – so we recognize that to have a truly complete community that involves all aspects of enjoying where you live, arts is a big part of it."

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An OCAD (Ontario Collage of Art and Design) University incubator space, Daniels' head office and office space for the Royal Bank of Canada will also take root at the waterfront project, which will consist of two residential towers and two commercial towers bound by Lake Shore Boulevard and Queens Quay to the north and south, and Richardson and Lower Jarvis streets east and west. The property will also include Sugar Beach North, an extension of the Sugar Beach public space located to the immediate south across Queens Quay.

"It's not your typical, one condominium, it's a whole redo of one city block," Mr. Tompa says. "So people love the idea this is a planned community that involves more than just residences. You've got great retail and restaurants at the base of the buildings, an office space component to it and all the cultural aspects to it."

A services director and 24-hour concierge will augment private facilities, including a third-floor community gardening plots and rooms, fitness centre, theatre and music studio. The 11th floor will offer a party room, lounge, catering kitchen and terrace with barbecuing facilities, plus a cocktail pool and bocce ball court.

"There are a lot of cool amenities in Lighthouse Tower that are really unique, like our kitchen library, jam and arts studios," Mr. Tompa says. "These are thing you don't typical find in a condo."

To find other essentials, Loblaws and new George Brown College are across the street and the St. Lawrence Market, Union Station, financial, fashion and entertainment districts are within a 10-minute walk.

"It's a great location," Mr. Tompa says. "We serve as a gateway to this Bayfront development, but at the same time, you've got a really nice connectivity to the city core because we're at the westernmost point of the Bayfront lands."

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The first tower will be 45-storeys encompassing 534 units ranging from studio to two-bedroom suites with New York-inspired, loft interiors with Miele appliances. Cecconi Simone appointments will become increasingly lavish on higher floors, such as 11-foot ceilings and four units per floor on the two penthouse levels.

Monthly fees will be about 57 cents per square feet. Units 605 square feet and larger will be eligible to buy parking.

Occupancy dates will begin summer 2019.

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