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done deal

The Globe and Mail

31 Albemarle Ave., Toronto

Asking price: $2,850,000 (September, 2021)

Previous asking price: $2,995,000 (June, 2021) *under previous agent

Selling price: $2,850,000 (September, 2021)

Taxes: $10,794 (2020)

Days on the market: five

Listing agent: Paul Johnston, Right at Home Realty Inc.

The action

The house was built by high-rise architect Rudy Wallman to be his own residence.The Globe and Mail

This modern three-storey house, built as his own residence by high-rise architect Rudy Wallman, resembles a white frosted lantern that glows at night. It is aesthetically pleasing, but it lacks parking, which turned off some buyers. The $2.995-million price tag, in a neighbourhood where more conventional properties with parking could be had for about $1.9-million this summer, was another challenge.

After an unsuccessful run this summer, a new agent was signed on in September who ordered a small makeover and trimmed the asking price. Within days of the reveal a buyer at full price was found.

“We adjusted the price slightly from earlier, we staged the main floor of the home, we had it rephotographed, and we remarketed the property very specifically to people looking for a unique and modern home,” said agent Paul Johnston.

“The buyer of a home like this is clearly looking for something that has prestige and uniqueness, and I don’t think there was anything else in the neighbourhood that came close.”

What they got

Massive windows and patio doors allow sunlight into two entertaining areas, including one with double height ceilings and a fireplace.The Globe and Mail

The three-bedroom house on a 25- by 72-foot lot was built a few years ago with high-end design elements, including a pneumatic elevator and a skylight that opens to a rooftop terrace.

Massive windows and patio doors allow sunlight into two entertaining areas, including one with double height ceilings and a fireplace.

The agent’s take

“The front façade of this home was a glass window wall I called the “white veil” because it has a milk glass element to it, which provided some privacy within the house. And the back of the house had another south-facing window wall,” said Mr. Johnston.

“Not surprisingly, it’s an architect’s approach to privilege natural light that you typically don’t get in a single-family home, but in a high-rise setting.”

Glass also encloses the pneumatic elevator. “This was the first time I’d seen this,” said Mr. Johnston.

“It addresses the aging in place concept, so you can access all floors of the house thanks to an elevator, and it doesn’t take up the same footprint as conventional elevator does.”

The three-bedroom house on a 25- by 72-foot lot was built a few years ago with high-end design elements.The Globe and Mail

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