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This contemporary, three-storey house was completed this year on a 14-by-67-foot lot near Trinity Bellwoods Park.

228 Niagara St., Toronto

Asking price: $2.15-million

Selling price: $2.15-million

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Taxes: $3,715 (2017)

Days on the market: 36

Listing agents: Paul Johnston and Matt Manuel, Right at Home Realty Inc.

The action

The heart of the home is an open entertaining, cooking and dining area with 10-foot ceilings and white oak hardwood floors.

Some buyers mistook this detached residence for a semi-detached one, so it took about a month this summer to find about three dozen buyers curious enough to venture inside. A deal was finally struck in July.

“There were a handful of other properties listed in the neighbourhood, but nothing quite like this,” agent Paul Johnston said.

“We did have two offers on the property. One didn’t work out, but the other was from someone who really fell in love with it and saw the value of it. So, they paid full price.”

What they got

A floating glass-lined staircase leads to a den and two bedrooms on the second floor.

At its centre is an open entertaining, cooking and dining area with 10-foot ceilings and white oak hardwood floors, as well as Fisher and Paykel appliances, a gas fireplace, rear window wall and door to the private backyard.

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A floating glass-lined staircase leads to a den and two bedrooms on the second floor. On the third floor, the master has a walk-in closet, private bathroom and deck.

The basement offers an extra bedroom, third bathroom and recreation area with heated concrete floors.

The agent's take

The third-floor master suite has a private deck.

“The architect, Kyra Clarkson, has done a series of these homes, called MODERNnest, and a lot of people have paid attention to them,” Mr. Johnston said.

“They have very similar design language, exterior cladding, windows, details and interiors, so they’ve become somewhat notorious because they’re dotted throughout the city.”

Not only did this home’s strength lie in its striking visual appeal, but its sense of grandeur.

“For a lot of infill townhomes, 14 feet is a fairly common width,” Mr. Johnston said. “But this house actually felt even larger perhaps because of the size of the windows and openness of the plan.”

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