Skip to main content
done deal

Sotheby’s International Realty Canada

304 Wellesley St. E., Toronto

Asking price: $2.495-million (Late September, 2021)

Previous asking price: $2,795,000 (Early September, 2021)

Selling price: $2.39-million (October, 2021)

Previous selling price: $1,850,000 (March, 2018)

Taxes: $8,609 (2021)

Days on the market: 29

Listing agents: Paul Maranger and Christian Vermast, Sotheby’s International Realty Canada

The action

There is an arched entryway into the living room, which has coffered ceilings and a fireplace as well as an exit to the rear patio and driveway.Sotheby’s International Realty Canada

Toronto’s leafy Cabbagetown, where carefully restored Victorians are the norm, made this 16-year-old house seem out of place, and only six people dropped by to take a look in its first week on the market. The price was trimmed by $300,000 to stir more interest and eventually a deal was struck.

“In North Toronto, people will favour new construction, but in Cabbagetown, people go there for the charm and are expecting an 1880 home with quirks,” agent Paul Maranger said.

Proximity to busy Parliament Street was also a slight drawback. “You can walk to everything – like the shops, etcetera along Parliament [Street] – but we heard it was just a bit too close.”

What they got

This three-storey house provides 2,196 square feet of living space, complete with three bedrooms, an office on the second floor and five bathrooms, including one with heated floors.

The dining room was decorated with wainscotting, and the kitchen outfitted with quartz countertops and stainless steel appliances. There is an arched entryway into the living room, which has coffered ceilings and a fireplace as well as an exit to the rear patio and driveway.

The 818-square-foot basement contains guest and recreation rooms.

The agent’s take

The kitchen is outfitted with quartz countertops and stainless steel appliances.Sotheby’s International Realty Canada

“In Cabbagetown, most houses have orange or red brick with yellow quoining and window lintels, but this one is all yellow brick, which is very unusual in the City of Toronto,” Mr. Maranger said.

“[Inside], they tried to replicate some Victorian elements you’d find in Cabbagetown, and this family also did upgrades over time, like they just did the kitchen.”

Even the front and rear yards of the 20-foot-by-100-lot were landscaped. “They also did lighting, so it felt like a resort with a nice feeling at night there,” Mr. Maranger said.

Your house is your most valuable asset. We have a weekly Real Estate newsletter to help you stay on top of news on the housing market, mortgages, the latest closings and more. Sign up today.