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home of the week

Loft living amidst la dolce vita

Home of the Week, 799 College St., unit 502.

Condo in infill building near Little Italy is appealing for a downsizing buyer

THE LISTING 799 College St., Unit 502

ASKING PRICE $1.095-million

TAXES $6,088.56 (2016)

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MONTHLY MAINTENANCE FEES $1,143.30

AGENT Robin Pope, Pope Real Estate Ltd.

The back story

The building is located beside the popular Bar Isabel.

As Little Italy's popular bars and chefs migrated farther west along College Street in recent years, the residential area near Ossington Avenue also became more lively. The area had lots of Victorian-era semi-detached houses, but not many high-rises or modern dwellings.

Cube Lofts, a six-storey building with about 20 units, was an infill project completed in 2013.

"It's a very small building," real estate agent Robin Pope of Pope Real Estate Ltd. says.

The building is a "soft" loft, which means it was newly built with the elements that make lofts so popular – including an open plan, large windows, high ceilings and modern design.

Smooth ceilings make the space feel less industrial than a ‘hard’ loft.

The building itself is spare, with a secluded entrance and no amenities.

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Inside the unit, the ceilings are smooth, Mr. Pope points out, which makes the space seem less industrial than a "hard" loft. The only exposed concrete in Unit 502 is in a few pillars.

The building's location next to Bar Isabel, and close to lots of bistros, fromageries and nightlife – makes the location very convenient for people who like to walk to their entertainment. On the opposite side of College Street and beyond, the streets are lined with red-brick houses, which means it's unlikely tall towers will rise to block the view, Mr. Pope says.

The unit today

The unit is designed to maximize natural light.

Owner Jennifer McNeill purchased one of the larger suites in the building, with two bedrooms and two bathrooms in 1,350 square feet spread out across the width of the building.

The split-bedroom plan places one bedroom at the east end and one at the west end, with a combined living, dining and study area in the centre. While units in some buildings can seem like a tunnel with a window at one end, this one is designed to maximize the light, Mr. Pope points out.

"This is like a bungalow," he says. "The apartment is wide and shallow so you get all of these windows."

The kitchen is part of an open-plan design.

He figures the unit will appeal to people who want room to spread out and have some outdoor space.

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"It's a perfect apartment for a couple downsizing from a larger home," he says.

The master bedroom has a seating area and doors to the exterior. The bathroom has a stand-alone shower and a deep bathtub.

The bathroom has a standalone shower and deep bathtub.

The second bedroom has a walk-in closet and opens to the terrace outside.

Throughout the unit, ceilings are nine-and-a-half feet high and there are floor-to-ceiling windows.

In the main room, the modern white kitchen has a large island with a breakfast bar. There's also a spot for a table or desk. There's plenty of room for dining and lounging in the open space.

The second bedroom opens to the terrace.

The view looks over the rooftops of nearby houses toward a palatial school in the distance.

"You're looking at a really nice Edwardian building," Mr. Pope says of the school on a hill in the distance."There is nice afternoon sun and amazing sunsets."

The best feature

The 531 square-foot outdoor area.

Walkout from both bedrooms and the living area lead to the outdoor space, which measures 531 square feet. There's a larger area for a dining table and a gas barbeque. The city skyline stands in the distance.

"There's a great view of downtown from the terrace," Mr. Pope says.

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