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3 PAISLEY AVE., TORONTO

ASKING PRICE $699,000

SELLING PRICE $810,000

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PREVIOUS SELLING PRICE $225,000 (1989)

TAXES $3,519 (2015)

DAYS ON THE MARKET Eight

LISTING AGENTS Irene Kaushansky and Philip Brown, Keller Williams Neighbourhood Realty

The Action: This renovated, semi-detached house near Jimmie Simpson Park had an exterior appearance unlike any of the other properties nearby, but it still reeled in nearly 100 private showings and more than 85 attendees to three open house events in early March. All that activity drummed up six competing offers, including one for $111,000 over the $699,000 list price.

What They Got: This 1,330-square-foot house was built on a 15-by-86-foot lot in 1875, but was modified decades ago, so it now has a modern façade with geometric windows and a two-storey light well illuminating the foyer and master on the second floor, which was also given sliding glass partitions between two sleeping quarters.

Entertaining areas include a living room with a wood burning fireplace, a raised kitchen updated with pot lights, a pantry, stainless steel appliances and a rear dining area with a walkout to a south-facing backyard and laneway parking, plus a lower level recreation room with the smaller of two bathrooms.

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The Agent's Take: "It's on a quieter Leslieville street without a lot of traffic," agent Irene Kaushansky said. "This is a very unique house; it really was unconventional."

For instance, couples and artists could relate to its physical form the most. "The bedroom layout was more like a loft or a condo in a house shell," Ms. Kaushansky said. "It was not set up for someone to go in and change it, we were looking for a type of person that would like it as it was."

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