Skip to main content

The Foxbar Collection at Blue Diamond, Yonge and St. Clair

BUILDER/DEVELOPER

Camrost-Felcorp Inc.

SIZE

Foxbar suites 1,185 to over 2,000 square feet; townhouses 2,600 to 3,040 square feet

PRICE

Foxbar suites $850,000 to $2.695-million; townhouses from $2.35-million

SALES CENTRE

1499 Yonge St., north of St. Clair Avenue. Open Monday to Thursday from noon to 6 p.m.; weekends from noon to 5 p.m.

CONTACT

Phone 416-925-2501 or visit thefoxbar.ca or bluediamondcondos.ca

It’s often true that the bigger the condominium, the bigger the bargain per square foot. But that’s not the case for a coveted new collection of suites at a luxury midtown development by Camrost-Felcorp Inc.

Unveiled at a preview event this week, the Foxbar Collection at Blue Diamond will consist of 36 two- and three-bedroom suites and 18 three-storey townhouses starting from $850,000 and $2.35-million respectively.

“From a sales point of view, it’s the first time in probably 30 years where larger units are currently priced higher than smaller units [per square foot],” says Joseph Feldman, development manager.

“The market is currently really underserved and there are few options, so we’re just introducing product at a very attractive price point that facilitates that overwhelming demand.”

These units will range from 1,185 to over 2,000 square feet on the top three floors of the 26-storey tower, which is part of Imperial Village, a master-planned community on a 2.9-acre site on St. Clair Avenue, east of Avenue Road.

“The Foxbar collection is able to offer larger units that are more functional in design, have larger bedrooms and more grandiose living space,” says Mr. Feldman.

“It really provides downsizers an opportunity to enter the condo market, which is hard to come by nowadays in Toronto.”

For buyers seeking the feel of a low-rise home without the maintenance, there will be townhouses between 1,600- and 3,040-square-feet with street-level entry off Foxbar Road, plus upper decks and backyard terraces.

“Townhouses are very different from condos, but on the theme of spaciousness, the townhomes fit that mandate of [offering] larger suites,” Mr. Feldman states.

Diamond Schmitt Architects designed the tower and repurposed the former Deer Park United Church as an open courtyard fronting the project. It will also oversee tower suite interiors, while designers U31 will dress the townhouses, each with three bedrooms, two bathrooms, an office and open principal rooms with 10-foot ceilings.

Townhouses will also have basements with access to an individual garage within an underground facility connected to recreational amenities in the high-rise and completed sister tower anchored by an LCBO and Market by Longo’s.

“In addition, through that P1 level, the whole building and complex will have access to this amazing facility in the adjacent Imperial Plaza, dubbed the Imperial Club,” Mr. Feldman states.

“It’s over 20,000 square feet of amenity space that includes swimming pools, squash courts, extensive fitness facilities, movie theatre room … and golf simulator.”

The former church courtyard will be lined with retail outlets. “Residents will be able to enjoy this very unique landmark in the city, just steps away from their lobby,” Mr. Feldman adds.

Monthly suite fees will be 59 cents a square foot and towns $375. Lockers will be $5,000 and parking $55,000.

Occupancy is slated for fall 2018.

Report an error Editorial code of conduct
Comments

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • All comments will be reviewed by one or more moderators before being posted to the site. This should only take a few moments.
  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

Comments that violate our community guidelines will be removed. Commenters who repeatedly violate community guidelines may be suspended, causing them to temporarily lose their ability to engage with comments.

Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.