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231 Lake Shore Dr., Toronto

231 LAKE SHORE DR., TORONTO

ASKING PRICE: $1,988,000

SELLING PRICE: $1,910,000

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TAXES: $9,100 (2017)

DAYS ON THE MARKET: six

LISTING AGENT: Jody Thompson, Re/Max Professionals Inc.

The Action: The seven-storey apartment building next to this squat 2,310-square-foot residence was off-putting to some buyers, but its private setting on a 50-by-151-foot lot with steps leading right to Lake Ontario was a redeeming feature for nature lovers. Three parties registered similar bids, so the sellers accepted one for $1.91-million in September.

"With less than 300 waterfront properties in Toronto, this one attracted a lot of attention for those looking for their own piece of paradise," agent Jody Thompson said.

"It's on the bike trail, right by the entrance to Humber College park, so I had people coming in with their bike gear on. Some people rode in from Oakville."

What They Got: The bones of this Mediterranean villa date back to 1925, but it was later rebuilt as a back-split with four finished levels, including a 984-square-foot basement.

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Off the driveway to a carport is the main foyer with steps up to the main level with an office, two bedrooms and a master retreat with a walk-in closet, wood-burning fireplace and one of three bathrooms.

Across the home's rear – facing the lake – is a lower level with a dining area and kitchen with sliding patio doors. Directly above is a living room with a central freestanding fireplace and walkouts to a deck.

The Agent's Take: "It has 50 feet of waterfront overlooking the park at the back of Humber, so it's just a spectacular and special property," Mr. Thompson said.

"A lot of lakefront lots are 25- or 30-feet [wide] so it's rare to get 50-feet."

The grounds were also groomed to captivate various lifeforms. "It has a very special backyard," Mr. Thompson said.

"One day during the open house, I counted over 19 monarch butterflies in a tree, there was a feeder with beautiful birds, and the local raccoon … was drinking out of the fountain."

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